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Canton, Missouri
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January 5, 1978     Press-News Journal
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January 5, 1978
 

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Barn crossing hearing00set xesidents ann ousmess- are mounting a drive to the closing of the road on U.S. 61 at the red barn located south and will present case at a hearing in City Jan. 11. of about 20 local businessmen and C-1 school officials held Dec. 28 at a business near the crossing. Beilstein, owner of Camper Sales, and a of the group, said the was held to organize effort to stop the State sway Department from the intersection. Bell- indicated the group was a petition in the to protest the closing the entire section of U.S. made limited access. the closing was in E CANTON the original plans, 98 percent of the veovle didn't realize it (the red burr: crossing; would be closed untl recently," said Beilstein. A hearing )efore the State Highway C.mmissioa has been schediled for next Wednesday, ,n. 11, in Jeffer- son City. :eilstein hoped several peole could attend the hearing nd present their case before he Commission. However, hefelt the timing was bad bemuse several of the people cldn't get away to attend thehearing on that date. Another hvinessman, Leon Jones of Rsey-Jones Mo- bile Homes id he has been writing lettes to "everyone he could thig of" to prevent the closing o the intersection. Jones said tP- only reasons he has been givn for the closing is the danger of the intersec- tion and the road was designed as a limited access highway. "Safety is not a factor, there is good visibility both ways. The present crossing has been there over a year and there have been no accidents that I know of. It's not nearly as dangerous as the intersection at Taylor," said Jones. Both Beilstein and Jones felt the "red barn" intersection was being singled out. "We wouldn't protest the closing if the highway was made limited access all the way up and down," said Jones. "There are some 11 crossings in 15 miles on 61 south of Taylor, yet this is the only one they are planning to close," he added. Beilstein said the closing would affect his business along with that of Ramsey- Jones and May's CB Sales. He listed others affected by the crossing being closed would be the Highland School Dis- trict bus routes, mailmen, residents of the Ramsey-Jones Trailer Park and ""about 30 farmers." Opponents to the closing said the closing in itself would cause more of a hazard than the intersection is now. "If they close it, then many farmers will have to use the highway to move farm ma- chinery to different fields instead of using the back roads like they do now with the crossing at the red barn," Beilstein said. The crossing is scheduled to be closed upon the completion of the new Wakonda State Park exit. SS- AND THI LEWIS COUNTY ' THURSDAY. fAN. 5, 1978 i, Historic house razed Wall of the olCt.musle building aLlver-Stoekton College comes crashingdown, as fire-ravaged building was razed last week by Jin Pierce Excavating Co. Building was second oldest on the campus, and had originally been a home for the college president. In later years it was used for sorority hoUS-tball durra, and classrooms, before being moved toew foundation to make room for construction of tht';dys Crown Student Center building. distribut00l New topographic maps of and clothing Christmas Kahoka & St. Patrick available to the generous giving Lewis Countians, the NE- office was able to make more joyous in 22 throughout the county. were 45 children re- toys, .dolls and cloth- which had been painted, cleaned and dressed friends who volunteered. Grandparents repaired dressed several dolls. in making decorations homes was another assist- given some children in NECAC office. clothing and are accepted the year- for those in need at the office, 505 Clark St., 288-3969 and someone be glad to pick them up. SECTIONS- 16 PAGES reports of the Basketball Tourna- fill three pages, begin- with page 3b. pre-inventory, end of the year sales can big savings for yon! the display advertising hunt this first-of-the- 5a 6a,7a lb 3b,4b,5b 6b Sb 7b $ue. News Ads News News Notices News Two photorevised 7rmin- ute topographic maps of the Kahoka and St. Patrick Quadrangels in northeast Mis- souri are now available from the Division of Geology and Land Survey, Missouri De- partment of Natural Re- sources in Rolla, State Geolo- gist Wallace B. Howe an- nounced. Aerial photographs were used as a basis for printing changes in light purple ink over regular topo- graphic maps made more than 28 years ago. The photorevised maps, drawn on a scale of one inch,, to 2,000 feet on the ground and covering about 60 square miles each, are sought after by builders, engineers, plan- ners and architects in urban areas who find them indis- pendable in their work. The newly released maps show physical characteristics in portions of Clark and Lewis Counties, Dr. Howe said. The shape of the land surface, or Completing plans for Jamboree Plans are nearly complete for the Canton Festival Theat- re Players Western Jamboree to be held Saturday, Jan. 14, beginning at 9 p.m. at Gladys Crown Student Center. Tickets are on sale at several downtown businesses. x. ) \\; t CLARK " / CO, ..., i 4, ,, L_ LEWIS CO. ../..-.- topography, is defined by thin brown lines that follow tht contours of hills and valleys. Each line is drawn at a specific elevation so that map users can find the elevation above sea level at any given point. The spacing of these lines tells the map reader how steep the slopes are (the closer the lines, the steeper the slope). Water features, including parts of Wyaconda River, Fox River, Honey Creek and Ramsey Branch are shown in blue. Black is used for buildings, cemeteries, place names and other works of man. By studying the maps, you can locate houses (yours perhaps), the towns of St. Patrick, Kahoka and Revere; Stone School; and Cedar Grove Church. Surfaced roads or highways, township boun- daries and sections lines are red. Green indicates timber, orchards or other vegetation. Housing developments, of- fice buildings, roads or high- ways built since 1949 are shown in light purple on the photorevised maps. These include the urban develop- ment around Kahoka; High- ways 81 and 136; as well as numerous ponds and quarries. Maps such as these are particularly helpful jn plan- ning construction that might be affected by physcial fea- tures. Factories and homes are easier and more economi- cal to build if the terrain is satisfactory. Highways, rail- (Continled on page 4a) Ffming Frontiers to be shown in cmton on Jan. 10 ge Nichols of Nichols Imp'ent Co., John Deere deato in Canton, will present the lhrming Frontiers Seven- ty-Eiht Tuesday, Jan. 10 at 7 p.m. the Methodist Church edna nal building. 'itfast moving, once-a- year, [arm oriented film pro|ra|, with new ideas in faro nnagement techniques anda l'k at new John Deore equ/pm t, such as the new MaEI 'ge planter in action Two local residents using the intersection at U.S. 61 a Landmark red barn located south of LaGrange. The State High Department proposes to close the intersection upon O/ crossin00 completion of new exit two miles north of" the red crossing. Local government cost lower than xl-: ,,.I-:l(;l-:s NO. 1 Closed noon hour at R.V begins Jan. 23 The R-V Board of Education voted last fall to institute a closed noon hour for elemen- tary students second semes- ter. A closed noon hour means that all students grades 1-6 will be expected to remain at school under school supervi- sion during the lunch period. The school lunch program provides a hot lunch at a daily cost of 50 cents per student or the student may bring his or her own lunch from home to oe catn in the iunchroom. Mrs. Sunderland, Elemen- tary Principal, indicates that the closed noon hour will begin the first full week of the second semester on Monday, Jan. 23. Any questions con- cerning the closed noon hour for grades I-6 may be directed to the elementary office. average for Lewis Co. residents For residents of Lewis County, is the cost of local government higher or lower than it is for people in other areas? What is their tax load, per capita, for the operation of their state and local govern- ments? As in every other section of the country, with the outlays for public services increasing year by year, the tax burden has been growing heavier. The demand is for more police protection, better schools, improved health facil- ities, additional roads and highways, more welfare and a host of other needs and wants. All of which cost money. The result has been, accord- ing to a national study by the Cummtrce Cieaciig Hote, an authority on taxes, that the cost of running state and local governments in the United States rose by an average of $67 per capita in the past fiscal year, reaching a new high of $731. As recently as 1970 it was only $427. In Lewis County, on the basis of its figures and data Jack Whit00cks purchase Tritsch Liquor Store Mr. and Mrs. Jack Whitiock of Canton have purchased the .Tritsch Liquor Store located at the corner of Clark and the Avenue of Missourians in downtown Canton. The Whitlocks purchased the business from Wayne Tritsch and took over owner- ship of the store on January 1. Whitlock indicated the store would remain much the same as it bad under the previous owner, with he and his wife the principal operators of the store. Hours will be from 8 a.m. to 10 P.m., however, he hoped to be able to expand the hours in the near future. The business has been renamed Jack's Package Liquor. Whiflock said he was "look- ing forward to serving the customers, both old and new." from local sources, such taxes came to approximately $550 in the year. Elsewhere in the State of Missouri, the average was $570, which was $47 more than in the year before. The tax load in the West North Central States as a whole was $668. Unusually large welfare costs, special housing pro- blems and other local condi- tions are the reasons for the high rates prevailing in some communities. In some others, inefficient management is the answer. In many localities, despite higher taxes, the amounts collected were not sufficient to cover necessary operating expenditures, with the results that they were forced to find new sources of revenue or go deeper into debt. All in all, taxes in the amount of $156.8 billion were collected by state and local governments in the past year. This was 10.8 per cent more than in the prior year. In Lewis County, the tax load came to an estimated $5,885,000. Grant $16 million loan to Continental Telephone Co. Congressman Harold Volk- mer announced the approval Of a $16,050,300 Rural Tele- phone Bank Loan to the Continental Telephone Com- pany of Missouri by the Rural Electrification Administra- tion. The funds will enable the company to finance facilities to connect 4,077 additional customers, to construct 153 miles of new line, to upgrade service in 34 exchanges to one- and four-party lines and to make system improve- merits. Continental Telephone, which is located in Wentzville, serves the Ninth District counties of St. Charles, Aud- rain, Clark, Knox, Lewis, Lincoln, Macon, Monroe, Montgomery, Ralis, Scotland and Warren. Eugene Fix is the president and manager of Continental Telephone Company of Mis- souri. Jan. 16 deadline for disaster loan applications Farmers m t'/ northeast Missouri counties have until Jan. 16 to apply for long-term, low-interest disaster loans, according to Congressman Harold L. Volkmer (9th DistrictL The counties are Audrain, Clark, Knox, Lewis, Macon, Marion, Monroe, Pike, Put- ham, Rails, Scotland, Schuy- ler, Shelby, Callaway, Lin- coln, Montgomery and Ran- dolph. Drought application forms can be obtained through the SBA and through Volkmer's office in the Federal Building at Hannibal. R.V Board to meet Canton R-V's Board of Education will meet in regu- lar session on Monday, Jan. 9, at 7:30 p.m. at the high school. All regular meetings of the board are open to the public. New Canton Police car City Administrator Jim Smith, left, and Alderman Boy Thirtyacre present keys to a 'new' ol|e car to Chief Randal Hill. The 1975 Plymouth Grand FUry, a former state patrol car, was secured from Missouri State Surplus in Jefferson City for $1395 by sealed bids, and brout to Canton this week. The other police car, recently dama in an accident, will be used as a backup car when repaired. Barn crossing hearing00set xesidents ann ousmess- are mounting a drive to the closing of the road on U.S. 61 at the red barn located south and will present case at a hearing in City Jan. 11. of about 20 local businessmen and C-1 school officials held Dec. 28 at a business near the crossing. Beilstein, owner of Camper Sales, and a of the group, said the was held to organize effort to stop the State sway Department from the intersection. Bell- indicated the group was a petition in the to protest the closing the entire section of U.S. made limited access. the closing was in E CANTON the original plans, 98 percent of the veovle didn't realize it (the red burr: crossing; would be closed untl recently," said Beilstein. A hearing )efore the State Highway C.mmissioa has been schediled for next Wednesday, ,n. 11, in Jeffer- son City. :eilstein hoped several peole could attend the hearing nd present their case before he Commission. However, hefelt the timing was bad bemuse several of the people cldn't get away to attend thehearing on that date. Another hvinessman, Leon Jones of Rsey-Jones Mo- bile Homes id he has been writing lettes to "everyone he could thig of" to prevent the closing o the intersection. Jones said tP- only reasons he has been givn for the closing is the danger of the intersec- tion and the road was designed as a limited access highway. "Safety is not a factor, there is good visibility both ways. The present crossing has been there over a year and there have been no accidents that I know of. It's not nearly as dangerous as the intersection at Taylor," said Jones. Both Beilstein and Jones felt the "red barn" intersection was being singled out. "We wouldn't protest the closing if the highway was made limited access all the way up and down," said Jones. "There are some 11 crossings in 15 miles on 61 south of Taylor, yet this is the only one they are planning to close," he added. Beilstein said the closing would affect his business along with that of Ramsey- Jones and May's CB Sales. He listed others affected by the crossing being closed would be the Highland School Dis- trict bus routes, mailmen, residents of the Ramsey-Jones Trailer Park and ""about 30 farmers." Opponents to the closing said the closing in itself would cause more of a hazard than the intersection is now. "If they close it, then many farmers will have to use the highway to move farm ma- chinery to different fields instead of using the back roads like they do now with the crossing at the red barn," Beilstein said. The crossing is scheduled to be closed upon the completion of the new Wakonda State Park exit. SS- AND THI LEWIS COUNTY ' THURSDAY. fAN. 5, 1978 i, Historic house razed Wall of the olCt.musle building aLlver-Stoekton College comes crashingdown, as fire-ravaged building was razed last week by Jin Pierce Excavating Co. Building was second oldest on the campus, and had originally been a home for the college president. In later years it was used for sorority hoUS-tball durra, and classrooms, before being moved toew foundation to make room for construction of tht';dys Crown Student Center building. distribut00l New topographic maps of and clothing Christmas Kahoka & St. Patrick available to the generous giving Lewis Countians, the NE- office was able to make more joyous in 22 throughout the county. were 45 children re- toys, .dolls and cloth- which had been painted, cleaned and dressed friends who volunteered. Grandparents repaired dressed several dolls. in making decorations homes was another assist- given some children in NECAC office. clothing and are accepted the year- for those in need at the office, 505 Clark St., 288-3969 and someone be glad to pick them up. SECTIONS- 16 PAGES reports of the Basketball Tourna- fill three pages, begin- with page 3b. pre-inventory, end of the year sales can big savings for yon! the display advertising hunt this first-of-the- 5a 6a,7a lb 3b,4b,5b 6b Sb 7b $ue. News Ads News News Notices News Two photorevised 7rmin- ute topographic maps of the Kahoka and St. Patrick Quadrangels in northeast Mis- souri are now available from the Division of Geology and Land Survey, Missouri De- partment of Natural Re- sources in Rolla, State Geolo- gist Wallace B. Howe an- nounced. Aerial photographs were used as a basis for printing changes in light purple ink over regular topo- graphic maps made more than 28 years ago. The photorevised maps, drawn on a scale of one inch,, to 2,000 feet on the ground and covering about 60 square miles each, are sought after by builders, engineers, plan- ners and architects in urban areas who find them indis- pendable in their work. The newly released maps show physical characteristics in portions of Clark and Lewis Counties, Dr. Howe said. The shape of the land surface, or Completing plans for Jamboree Plans are nearly complete for the Canton Festival Theat- re Players Western Jamboree to be held Saturday, Jan. 14, beginning at 9 p.m. at Gladys Crown Student Center. Tickets are on sale at several downtown businesses. x. ) \\; t CLARK " / CO, ..., i 4, ,, L_ LEWIS CO. ../..-.- topography, is defined by thin brown lines that follow tht contours of hills and valleys. Each line is drawn at a specific elevation so that map users can find the elevation above sea level at any given point. The spacing of these lines tells the map reader how steep the slopes are (the closer the lines, the steeper the slope). Water features, including parts of Wyaconda River, Fox River, Honey Creek and Ramsey Branch are shown in blue. Black is used for buildings, cemeteries, place names and other works of man. By studying the maps, you can locate houses (yours perhaps), the towns of St. Patrick, Kahoka and Revere; Stone School; and Cedar Grove Church. Surfaced roads or highways, township boun- daries and sections lines are red. Green indicates timber, orchards or other vegetation. Housing developments, of- fice buildings, roads or high- ways built since 1949 are shown in light purple on the photorevised maps. These include the urban develop- ment around Kahoka; High- ways 81 and 136; as well as numerous ponds and quarries. Maps such as these are particularly helpful jn plan- ning construction that might be affected by physcial fea- tures. Factories and homes are easier and more economi- cal to build if the terrain is satisfactory. Highways, rail- (Continled on page 4a) Ffming Frontiers to be shown in cmton on Jan. 10 ge Nichols of Nichols Imp'ent Co., John Deere deato in Canton, will present the lhrming Frontiers Seven- ty-Eiht Tuesday, Jan. 10 at 7 p.m. the Methodist Church edna nal building. 'itfast moving, once-a- year, [arm oriented film pro|ra|, with new ideas in faro nnagement techniques anda l'k at new John Deore equ/pm t, such as the new MaEI 'ge planter in action Two local residents using the intersection at U.S. 61 a Landmark red barn located south of LaGrange. The State High Department proposes to close the intersection upon O/ crossin00 completion of new exit two miles north of" the red crossing. Local government cost lower than xl-: ,,.I-:l(;l-:s NO. 1 Closed noon hour at R.V begins Jan. 23 The R-V Board of Education voted last fall to institute a closed noon hour for elemen- tary students second semes- ter. A closed noon hour means that all students grades 1-6 will be expected to remain at school under school supervi- sion during the lunch period. The school lunch program provides a hot lunch at a daily cost of 50 cents per student or the student may bring his or her own lunch from home to oe catn in the iunchroom. Mrs. Sunderland, Elemen- tary Principal, indicates that the closed noon hour will begin the first full week of the second semester on Monday, Jan. 23. Any questions con- cerning the closed noon hour for grades I-6 may be directed to the elementary office. average for Lewis Co. residents For residents of Lewis County, is the cost of local government higher or lower than it is for people in other areas? What is their tax load, per capita, for the operation of their state and local govern- ments? As in every other section of the country, with the outlays for public services increasing year by year, the tax burden has been growing heavier. The demand is for more police protection, better schools, improved health facil- ities, additional roads and highways, more welfare and a host of other needs and wants. All of which cost money. The result has been, accord- ing to a national study by the Cummtrce Cieaciig Hote, an authority on taxes, that the cost of running state and local governments in the United States rose by an average of $67 per capita in the past fiscal year, reaching a new high of $731. As recently as 1970 it was only $427. In Lewis County, on the basis of its figures and data Jack Whit00cks purchase Tritsch Liquor Store Mr. and Mrs. Jack Whitiock of Canton have purchased the .Tritsch Liquor Store located at the corner of Clark and the Avenue of Missourians in downtown Canton. The Whitlocks purchased the business from Wayne Tritsch and took over owner- ship of the store on January 1. Whitlock indicated the store would remain much the same as it bad under the previous owner, with he and his wife the principal operators of the store. Hours will be from 8 a.m. to 10 P.m., however, he hoped to be able to expand the hours in the near future. The business has been renamed Jack's Package Liquor. Whiflock said he was "look- ing forward to serving the customers, both old and new." from local sources, such taxes came to approximately $550 in the year. Elsewhere in the State of Missouri, the average was $570, which was $47 more than in the year before. The tax load in the West North Central States as a whole was $668. Unusually large welfare costs, special housing pro- blems and other local condi- tions are the reasons for the high rates prevailing in some communities. In some others, inefficient management is the answer. In many localities, despite higher taxes, the amounts collected were not sufficient to cover necessary operating expenditures, with the results that they were forced to find new sources of revenue or go deeper into debt. All in all, taxes in the amount of $156.8 billion were collected by state and local governments in the past year. This was 10.8 per cent more than in the prior year. In Lewis County, the tax load came to an estimated $5,885,000. Grant $16 million loan to Continental Telephone Co. Congressman Harold Volk- mer announced the approval Of a $16,050,300 Rural Tele- phone Bank Loan to the Continental Telephone Com- pany of Missouri by the Rural Electrification Administra- tion. The funds will enable the company to finance facilities to connect 4,077 additional customers, to construct 153 miles of new line, to upgrade service in 34 exchanges to one- and four-party lines and to make system improve- merits. Continental Telephone, which is located in Wentzville, serves the Ninth District counties of St. Charles, Aud- rain, Clark, Knox, Lewis, Lincoln, Macon, Monroe, Montgomery, Ralis, Scotland and Warren. Eugene Fix is the president and manager of Continental Telephone Company of Mis- souri. Jan. 16 deadline for disaster loan applications Farmers m t'/ northeast Missouri counties have until Jan. 16 to apply for long-term, low-interest disaster loans, according to Congressman Harold L. Volkmer (9th DistrictL The counties are Audrain, Clark, Knox, Lewis, Macon, Marion, Monroe, Pike, Put- ham, Rails, Scotland, Schuy- ler, Shelby, Callaway, Lin- coln, Montgomery and Ran- dolph. Drought application forms can be obtained through the SBA and through Volkmer's office in the Federal Building at Hannibal. R.V Board to meet Canton R-V's Board of Education will meet in regu- lar session on Monday, Jan. 9, at 7:30 p.m. at the high school. All regular meetings of the board are open to the public. New Canton Police car City Administrator Jim Smith, left, and Alderman Boy Thirtyacre present keys to a 'new' ol|e car to Chief Randal Hill. The 1975 Plymouth Grand FUry, a former state patrol car, was secured from Missouri State Surplus in Jefferson City for $1395 by sealed bids, and brout to Canton this week. The other police car, recently dama in an accident, will be used as a backup car when repaired.