Newspaper Archive of
Press-News Journal
Canton, Missouri
Lyft
February 21, 1985     Press-News Journal
PAGE 3     (3 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 3     (3 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
February 21, 1985
 

Newspaper Archive of Press-News Journal produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




ENERAL NEWS I from Page 1 accompanied them on the board members are now events and shows and pertinent information that into the 1985 Lewis lir Book. treasurer, has issued the 1964 financial statement. is a summary of the which covers the period 1, 1983. to Nov. 30. 1984: as of Dec 1 was income for the year was the subtotal amounted to expenses totaled $45.888.95: of Nov, 30 amounted to Included in the expenses are improvements costing Some of the improvements electrical equipment. and duct work, tables outdoor stage, paint, and repairs. At the time, the oustanding fair- debt totals $I0.000 plus of 18 members were present as well as six guests, meeting of the fair will be held Tuesday 5, at the fairgrounds." NEW SALESMAN -- Robert W'elch, 56, Hannibal, has joined the sales staff of Lewis County Motor Company. Welch has a background of selling used cars in Hannibal. He started his 0ew position several weeks ago. native Jim Boeger for Scout work Canton native, son of AntoneUi of Canton. an American Boy Scout "God and Se'ice the Christ United Metho- in Rockford. IlL early in in the Rockford news- some of his experi- his 18 years in Scouting. of them as a Scoutmaster. last eight of them in noted Boeger. at 6 feet 9. himself as "just a from Missouri who it "didn't hurt me a bit to the work ethic." also stated Boeger share with his students students are as new to is his enthusiasm for Boy Scot movement. from the article: him ending up with astronomical. he wasn't trained for it. spent a boyhoed day as a first association with Scouts young adult when he was a memorable field experi- scrambled pa'ncakes scrambled pancakes? In one winter, one of Jim's pals to a brush with nature via the woods. The cabin, it It, came equipped with a Scouts. cots no longer 1, and food from a recipe that night i"one of ') on a table that would his frame -- and woke it) in 1965. tie is married to the former Phyllis Snyder of Spring Lake, Mich, Now 42. he exercised his father's option of a career change, from design engineer to classroom lecturer, a few months ago on the campus of Rock Valley College. He found the transition "not scary at all" -- indeed, "more relaxed" than the business world "'which was very good to me." Without children of his own, he counts Boy Scout Troop 425 at church as surrogate progeny. Boy Scout skills change all the time. Computers are a very big word in merit projects today. But Jim says three cardinal strengths remain the same in the Scouting movement -- "Belief in G( and country, citizenship training and str(ng moral character" What's /he secre h sparking Bov Scout intenI'? "Yc)u've g)t to want i'D do it," says Jim. I-It ":,ant:- o lead Scouts enough so that this summer he'Ll take the troop rafting down the Snake River in the Grand Teton Mountains. And the rewards from such strentt- .us adventures? Says Jim. "You watch a young, mischievous, half- afraid ll-year-old. He grows up. And you see a mature, contributing member of society. And you say to Yourself. roaN'be, just maybe, you contributed too. That beats all the newspaper articles and awards you could ever get." Fire destroys sows, pigs and Abused Victims Network plans refuge center Plans are in the making for help for women and children and even to a lesser extent men, due to domestic abuse. AVENUEL an acronym which stands for Abused Victims Education Network Unified to Ensure Safety, is a regional organization, currently with eight Northeast Missouri Counties, including Lewis County, represented. Among the plans are a refuge center : for the future, which will allow .... . temporary housing for victims of domestic abuse. One source notes FBI statistics saying a woman is beaten in the United States every 18 seconds, and 96 percent of all domestic violence is against women and affects families, regardless of financial or educational level. AVENUES hopes to get abused people out of the situation and into a shelter to give them time to think of options. The program also encourages family counseling. Currently the closest available shelter is Woodland Quanada in Quincy. which one representative of AVENUES said has worked really well, and will take Missouri domestic victims when it isn't full. AVENUES hopes to continue to raise community awareness to the problem of domestic abuse and options available. The group began out of a November workshop in Hannibal, sponsored by a branch of the AAUW. Those currently involved are working on bylaws for possible incorporation as a non-profit organization, in conjunction with the Missouri Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The next meeting of AVENUES will be 2 p.m. Friday at the Hannibal Federal Building, Room 260. People wanting more information may contact 314 248-1111. Dale Stephenson buys veterinary  practice in Neb. Dr, Dale Stephenson, presently al Ralston, has purchased the veterinary practice of Dr. Robert Hartley in Norfolk, Neb. He will specialize in treatment of dogs, cats, and other small animals, also equine treatment, and will operate the city pound. Dr. Stephenson, who graduated from Canton High School in 1969, and attended Culver-Stockton College one year, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Stephenson of Canton. He graduated from Northeast Mis- souri State University, Kirksville. with a bachelor of music degree. He taught school one year at Canton, I11., then returned to Missouri and Northeast Ms. State to take pre-veteri- narv subjects. After that he attended the'University of Missouri School of Veterinary Medicine where he was graduated [n 1980. of aspiring young He has since been at the Ralston Scouts Veterinary Clinic in a small animal were about to farrowing k.,Ouse iry work at Boys Town, Neb., and having already and equine practice. He has also done said milk. But they'd the milk. So they mixed :'chocolate. Now they needed the butter had been used before for popcorn." Jim in went the eggs. What he he decided later, was failure" something the learn from and adjust to. he began his discovery wasn't "just camping or helping that little old lady street." It was a much 1, intending "to young man's character." then, Jim Boeger hadn't plunge. "For a couple be recalled, an obviously luke warm. that day he was car in the country, rounded confronted a crisis: a convertible with persons "I wasn't trained :lidn't know what to do," a nearby Scoutmaster 'authority, stop- recruiting motorists, to lift the convertible says Jim, "and I said 'H ey, Ire got to get with this'." And he did. farming community of the only child of S. Georgina Boeger, Jim chores from doing them need his rural per- 4-H projects. His taught him about career one choice turns sour. career as a graduate senior Boeger took up the engineering ethic a bachelor of arts mechanical engineering niversity of Missouri in master's in industrial from Purdue Univers- " A metal farrowing house and a taken care of other diary and beef number of swine were destroyed in a herds. fire Sunday night. His wife, Linda, is currently The farrowing house, 10 sows, and teaching home economics at Papillion 1( pigs. on the Howard Ellison farm and will be arriving in Norfolk at the on Route P were consumed in the fire. end of the school year. she is Canton volunteer firemen were originally from Bettendorf, la. The called to the scene shortly after 8 p.m. Stephensons have one daughter, Kris- and were on the scene for about three tin. 3. hours, One fireman said the loss was SUBSCRIBE TO THE estimated at $15.000 and said the probable cause was electrical. PRESS-NEWS JOURNAL Tax D eductlble Individual Retirement Account The law allows you to set up your own tax- sheltered retirement plan even though you may already be covered by a pension where you work. You can save up to $2,000 or 100% of your income, whichever is less, on a tax deductible basis. These savings are possible with the Individual Retire- ment Account (IRA). PAYING !1.75% CONTACT... JOE QUINN Canton Ins. Agency 339 LEWIS ST. CANTON, MS. 63435 314-288-5251 "YOUR FAMILY INSURANCE CENTER" Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, February 21, 1985, Page 3a ,nnual Science Fair Sat. at C-SC Area junior and senior high school students are completing their pro- jects for the 27th annual Culver- Stockton College Science Fair. which will take place Saturday, Feb. 23, in the C-S Field House. With 180 entries already registered, this will be a very large fair, According to Dr. John Brodmann, C-S professor of chemistry and director of the event. David Dodd, science ihstructor at Macomb High School, serves as registrar. Proiects for the science fair will be the work of students from 10 northeast Missouri and western Illinois school districts. The fair is organized and run 'New look' for gas bills is enveloped Customers of Great River Gas Company in both Iowa and Missouri will see a "new look" to their monthly bills beginning in February. The company is changing the format of the bill in an effort to provide more information relative to consumption, charges, etc. Some of the obvious charges customers will notice is that their bills will be mailed in an envelope rather than the postcard type bill presently used. Instructions are also printed on the back of the onvelope which show how to use the same envelope for returning pay- meats. Ran Westby, manager of public affairs, said recently that Great River is making the changes in response to customers who have indicated that they would like to see additional items on their monthly bill. One example will be showing the cost per Therm of gas on the "usage" portion of the bill. Another addition to the new bill format will allow customers to see when their next scheduled meter reading date is for the following month. Westby stated he hoped customers would take advantage of the return envelope provided for their payment, and hoped the additional information on the new bill would be beneficial to all customers. He also said that customers can find a complete explanation o: the various components of the bill on the reverse side of the bill; however, if any customers have any questions about the new form they are encouraged to call the company's business office and ask for a customer representative. Great River Gas Company serves about 17,000 customers in Iowa and Missouri. bv area junior and senior high school d:lence nstructors and is sponsored by local science clubs in cooperation with C-S. Participants are divided into junior and senior divisions and will compete in several categories, including be- havioral sciences, botany, engineering, earth science, mathematics, physical science, zoology, chemistry, environ- mental science and medicine and health. The science fair will be open to the public from 1:30 thru 3:30 p.m. for viewing in the Field House. Awards ceremonies will begin at 3:30. Medals will be awarded to the first, CLUB NEWS Garnett Grange Garnett Grange held a Feb. 8 meeting in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Lay and Darla. Master Danny Lay was in charge of the meeting. All officers were present except one. Melba Jeffers, home ec chairman, announced the various contests, new rules and sponsors. Sewing contest entries need to be in by April 15. Each Grange has been asked to send 13 entries to State contest. She also read an article on wise shopping and how to get the most for your money. Virginia Lay was presented award money for a whll hanging sent to State Grange in 1984. A valentine was signed by all present for Flossie Stephenson, who is at the Lewis County Nursing Home. Albert Lay, agricultural chairman, and Glen Jeffers, legislature represen- tative, gave talks on the hazardous chemicals that will eventually be banned from use. A discussion followed on current farm problems. Doris Lay, secretary, informed Grangers state dues had been raised to $8 per member. A discussion was made to raise dues on the subordinate level to $12.50 per member to help defray the cost. Master Lay told Grangers National Grange would like all members to help promote the seat belt law. Lecturer Mary Dean Farr presented a literary program by reading a poem "A Smile is Contagious." She also led the members in playing games. Refreshments were served at the close of the meeting. The next meeting will be March 8. second and third place winners in each category of both divisions, and each entrant will receive an individual judge's rating compiled by two or three judges selected from a pool of 40 educators from area high schools, colleges, universities and representa- tives from the U.S. Department of Conservation. Students participating from Illinois representatives from Barry, Southeast- ern of Augusta, Hamilton and Macomb. Missouri schools represented are Bevier, Clarence, Highland, Pal- myra, Shelbina and Sheibyville. Movie to be program of Emergency Corps The Lewis County Emergency Corps will show a movie Thursday at 7 p.m. at their regular meeting. The film "Handling L.P. Gas Emergencies," will be shown with a new film projector and screen purchased by the Lewis County Ambulance Auxiliary and the Emer- gency Corps. It is open for corps members and interested parties of the general ' public. There is no admission charge. The film is just one of many additional films planned for the Corps meetings. The Great Seed Corn Jacket Tradition Order 5 uoits or more of GR8 Seed Corn, and you will receive a FREE green GR8 Jacket dur- ing GREAT Grower Days. Order today and get an even Greater 1985 Corn Crop. Shiasler Seed Co ..... Farmers dealing with Farmers and Growing from a Great Tradition. Contact your local GR8 dealer: Kent Munzlinger nton Ayerco Specials 1985 PRICESEFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 20 - 26, SERVICE ON EVERY AD muue.no ;  j Beverases 6rocerfes00000000 Busch $2 29 Butternut Home Style ,, oz. ,OAF ...... " Br.d ........ 3/$I.00 tite . ., 2. .oz. ,,., $8 99 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Budweiser Light... .Q.k Y.... 99' AMERICAN, SHARP CHEDDAR, CHEDDAR, Nabisco Easy CHEESE & BACON REG. $1.89 Cheese Spread ./, 07. CA. $1 49 • • • • • • • • • S Nabisco REG. $u9 :., ?x Triscuit Crackers .$1.19 Rubinoff VodkaS.°. .oaf.  .*".?$3.95 80 PROOF, 7S0 ML. 00mmS z Crown ....... $5.95 Frito Lay O'Gradys no. su, Potato Chips .... : .:..?... 99’ Strawberry or Cherry Flavor REG. u' Jetlo ........... ,. ?z. 2169' 80 PROOF, 750 ML. Jack Daniels Black $8.95 Liver or Beef REG. w|rv • • • • • • Q • • • • • • • • • 7up, Diet 7up, ram. SLn Like & Diet Like ..... 99' De, Express Butcher Boy . ,r Burrit0....5, .°L Rp....R.w..OT..49  Open 7 days a week, 6:00 a.m. - 12:00 midnight Phone 288-3062 We Iwv. The Right to Undt, Quan’iti. wJnjlnulJlUJJllmxu Deft ,,, REG. $1.49 Ham Sandwich ............ 99 q (fries, salad, roll & butter) s7.9o vAtUE 2- 4pc. ChickenDinr$; .55.95 ..nu.. Three Fresh 75. vAU Hoi'N One Donuts 3/49 € ENERAL NEWS I from Page 1 accompanied them on the board members are now events and shows and pertinent information that into the 1985 Lewis lir Book. treasurer, has issued the 1964 financial statement. is a summary of the which covers the period 1, 1983. to Nov. 30. 1984: as of Dec 1 was income for the year was the subtotal amounted to expenses totaled $45.888.95: of Nov, 30 amounted to Included in the expenses are improvements costing Some of the improvements electrical equipment. and duct work, tables outdoor stage, paint, and repairs. At the time, the oustanding fair- debt totals $I0.000 plus of 18 members were present as well as six guests, meeting of the fair will be held Tuesday 5, at the fairgrounds." NEW SALESMAN -- Robert W'elch, 56, Hannibal, has joined the sales staff of Lewis County Motor Company. Welch has a background of selling used cars in Hannibal. He started his 0ew position several weeks ago. native Jim Boeger for Scout work Canton native, son of AntoneUi of Canton. an American Boy Scout "God and Se'ice the Christ United Metho- in Rockford. IlL early in in the Rockford news- some of his experi- his 18 years in Scouting. of them as a Scoutmaster. last eight of them in noted Boeger. at 6 feet 9. himself as "just a from Missouri who it "didn't hurt me a bit to the work ethic." also stated Boeger share with his students students are as new to is his enthusiasm for Boy Scot movement. from the article: him ending up with astronomical. he wasn't trained for it. spent a boyhoed day as a first association with Scouts young adult when he was a memorable field experi- scrambled pa'ncakes scrambled pancakes? In one winter, one of Jim's pals to a brush with nature via the woods. The cabin, it It, came equipped with a Scouts. cots no longer 1, and food from a recipe that night i"one of ') on a table that would his frame -- and woke it) in 1965. tie is married to the former Phyllis Snyder of Spring Lake, Mich, Now 42. he exercised his father's option of a career change, from design engineer to classroom lecturer, a few months ago on the campus of Rock Valley College. He found the transition "not scary at all" -- indeed, "more relaxed" than the business world "'which was very good to me." Without children of his own, he counts Boy Scout Troop 425 at church as surrogate progeny. Boy Scout skills change all the time. Computers are a very big word in merit projects today. But Jim says three cardinal strengths remain the same in the Scouting movement -- "Belief in G( and country, citizenship training and str(ng moral character" What's /he secre h sparking Bov Scout intenI'? "Yc)u've g)t to want i'D do it," says Jim. I-It ":,ant:- o lead Scouts enough so that this summer he'Ll take the troop rafting down the Snake River in the Grand Teton Mountains. And the rewards from such strentt- .us adventures? Says Jim. "You watch a young, mischievous, half- afraid ll-year-old. He grows up. And you see a mature, contributing member of society. And you say to Yourself. roaN'be, just maybe, you contributed too. That beats all the newspaper articles and awards you could ever get." Fire destroys sows, pigs and Abused Victims Network plans refuge center Plans are in the making for help for women and children and even to a lesser extent men, due to domestic abuse. AVENUEL an acronym which stands for Abused Victims Education Network Unified to Ensure Safety, is a regional organization, currently with eight Northeast Missouri Counties, including Lewis County, represented. Among the plans are a refuge center : for the future, which will allow .... . temporary housing for victims of domestic abuse. One source notes FBI statistics saying a woman is beaten in the United States every 18 seconds, and 96 percent of all domestic violence is against women and affects families, regardless of financial or educational level. AVENUES hopes to get abused people out of the situation and into a shelter to give them time to think of options. The program also encourages family counseling. Currently the closest available shelter is Woodland Quanada in Quincy. which one representative of AVENUES said has worked really well, and will take Missouri domestic victims when it isn't full. AVENUES hopes to continue to raise community awareness to the problem of domestic abuse and options available. The group began out of a November workshop in Hannibal, sponsored by a branch of the AAUW. Those currently involved are working on bylaws for possible incorporation as a non-profit organization, in conjunction with the Missouri Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The next meeting of AVENUES will be 2 p.m. Friday at the Hannibal Federal Building, Room 260. People wanting more information may contact 314 248-1111. Dale Stephenson buys veterinary  practice in Neb. Dr, Dale Stephenson, presently al Ralston, has purchased the veterinary practice of Dr. Robert Hartley in Norfolk, Neb. He will specialize in treatment of dogs, cats, and other small animals, also equine treatment, and will operate the city pound. Dr. Stephenson, who graduated from Canton High School in 1969, and attended Culver-Stockton College one year, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Stephenson of Canton. He graduated from Northeast Mis- souri State University, Kirksville. with a bachelor of music degree. He taught school one year at Canton, I11., then returned to Missouri and Northeast Ms. State to take pre-veteri- narv subjects. After that he attended the'University of Missouri School of Veterinary Medicine where he was graduated [n 1980. of aspiring young He has since been at the Ralston Scouts Veterinary Clinic in a small animal were about to farrowing k.,Ouse iry work at Boys Town, Neb., and having already and equine practice. He has also done said milk. But they'd the milk. So they mixed :'chocolate. Now they needed the butter had been used before for popcorn." Jim in went the eggs. What he he decided later, was failure" something the learn from and adjust to. he began his discovery wasn't "just camping or helping that little old lady street." It was a much 1, intending "to young man's character." then, Jim Boeger hadn't plunge. "For a couple be recalled, an obviously luke warm. that day he was car in the country, rounded confronted a crisis: a convertible with persons "I wasn't trained :lidn't know what to do," a nearby Scoutmaster 'authority, stop- recruiting motorists, to lift the convertible says Jim, "and I said 'H ey, Ire got to get with this'." And he did. farming community of the only child of S. Georgina Boeger, Jim chores from doing them need his rural per- 4-H projects. His taught him about career one choice turns sour. career as a graduate senior Boeger took up the engineering ethic a bachelor of arts mechanical engineering niversity of Missouri in master's in industrial from Purdue Univers- " A metal farrowing house and a taken care of other diary and beef number of swine were destroyed in a herds. fire Sunday night. His wife, Linda, is currently The farrowing house, 10 sows, and teaching home economics at Papillion 1( pigs. on the Howard Ellison farm and will be arriving in Norfolk at the on Route P were consumed in the fire. end of the school year. she is Canton volunteer firemen were originally from Bettendorf, la. The called to the scene shortly after 8 p.m. Stephensons have one daughter, Kris- and were on the scene for about three tin. 3. hours, One fireman said the loss was SUBSCRIBE TO THE estimated at $15.000 and said the probable cause was electrical. PRESS-NEWS JOURNAL Tax D eductlble Individual Retirement Account The law allows you to set up your own tax- sheltered retirement plan even though you may already be covered by a pension where you work. You can save up to $2,000 or 100% of your income, whichever is less, on a tax deductible basis. These savings are possible with the Individual Retire- ment Account (IRA). PAYING !1.75% CONTACT... JOE QUINN Canton Ins. Agency 339 LEWIS ST. CANTON, MS. 63435 314-288-5251 "YOUR FAMILY INSURANCE CENTER" Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, February 21, 1985, Page 3a ,nnual Science Fair Sat. at C-SC Area junior and senior high school students are completing their pro- jects for the 27th annual Culver- Stockton College Science Fair. which will take place Saturday, Feb. 23, in the C-S Field House. With 180 entries already registered, this will be a very large fair, According to Dr. John Brodmann, C-S professor of chemistry and director of the event. David Dodd, science ihstructor at Macomb High School, serves as registrar. Proiects for the science fair will be the work of students from 10 northeast Missouri and western Illinois school districts. The fair is organized and run 'New look' for gas bills is enveloped Customers of Great River Gas Company in both Iowa and Missouri will see a "new look" to their monthly bills beginning in February. The company is changing the format of the bill in an effort to provide more information relative to consumption, charges, etc. Some of the obvious charges customers will notice is that their bills will be mailed in an envelope rather than the postcard type bill presently used. Instructions are also printed on the back of the onvelope which show how to use the same envelope for returning pay- meats. Ran Westby, manager of public affairs, said recently that Great River is making the changes in response to customers who have indicated that they would like to see additional items on their monthly bill. One example will be showing the cost per Therm of gas on the "usage" portion of the bill. Another addition to the new bill format will allow customers to see when their next scheduled meter reading date is for the following month. Westby stated he hoped customers would take advantage of the return envelope provided for their payment, and hoped the additional information on the new bill would be beneficial to all customers. He also said that customers can find a complete explanation o: the various components of the bill on the reverse side of the bill; however, if any customers have any questions about the new form they are encouraged to call the company's business office and ask for a customer representative. Great River Gas Company serves about 17,000 customers in Iowa and Missouri. bv area junior and senior high school d:lence nstructors and is sponsored by local science clubs in cooperation with C-S. Participants are divided into junior and senior divisions and will compete in several categories, including be- havioral sciences, botany, engineering, earth science, mathematics, physical science, zoology, chemistry, environ- mental science and medicine and health. The science fair will be open to the public from 1:30 thru 3:30 p.m. for viewing in the Field House. Awards ceremonies will begin at 3:30. Medals will be awarded to the first, CLUB NEWS Garnett Grange Garnett Grange held a Feb. 8 meeting in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Lay and Darla. Master Danny Lay was in charge of the meeting. All officers were present except one. Melba Jeffers, home ec chairman, announced the various contests, new rules and sponsors. Sewing contest entries need to be in by April 15. Each Grange has been asked to send 13 entries to State contest. She also read an article on wise shopping and how to get the most for your money. Virginia Lay was presented award money for a whll hanging sent to State Grange in 1984. A valentine was signed by all present for Flossie Stephenson, who is at the Lewis County Nursing Home. Albert Lay, agricultural chairman, and Glen Jeffers, legislature represen- tative, gave talks on the hazardous chemicals that will eventually be banned from use. A discussion followed on current farm problems. Doris Lay, secretary, informed Grangers state dues had been raised to $8 per member. A discussion was made to raise dues on the subordinate level to $12.50 per member to help defray the cost. Master Lay told Grangers National Grange would like all members to help promote the seat belt law. Lecturer Mary Dean Farr presented a literary program by reading a poem "A Smile is Contagious." She also led the members in playing games. Refreshments were served at the close of the meeting. The next meeting will be March 8. second and third place winners in each category of both divisions, and each entrant will receive an individual judge's rating compiled by two or three judges selected from a pool of 40 educators from area high schools, colleges, universities and representa- tives from the U.S. Department of Conservation. Students participating from Illinois representatives from Barry, Southeast- ern of Augusta, Hamilton and Macomb. Missouri schools represented are Bevier, Clarence, Highland, Pal- myra, Shelbina and Sheibyville. Movie to be program of Emergency Corps The Lewis County Emergency Corps will show a movie Thursday at 7 p.m. at their regular meeting. The film "Handling L.P. Gas Emergencies," will be shown with a new film projector and screen purchased by the Lewis County Ambulance Auxiliary and the Emer- gency Corps. It is open for corps members and interested parties of the general ' public. There is no admission charge. The film is just one of many additional films planned for the Corps meetings. The Great Seed Corn Jacket Tradition Order 5 uoits or more of GR8 Seed Corn, and you will receive a FREE green GR8 Jacket dur- ing GREAT Grower Days. Order today and get an even Greater 1985 Corn Crop. Shiasler Seed Co ..... Farmers dealing with Farmers and Growing from a Great Tradition. Contact your local GR8 dealer: Kent Munzlinger nton Ayerco Specials 1985 PRICESEFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 20 - 26, SERVICE ON EVERY AD muue.no ;  j Beverases 6rocerfes00000000 Busch $2 29 Butternut Home Style ,, oz. ,OAF ...... " Br.d ........ 3/$I.00 tite . ., 2. .oz. ,,., $8 99 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Budweiser Light... .Q.k Y.... 99' AMERICAN, SHARP CHEDDAR, CHEDDAR, Nabisco Easy CHEESE & BACON REG. $1.89 Cheese Spread ./, 07. CA. $1 49 • • • • • • • • • S Nabisco REG. $u9 :., ?x Triscuit Crackers .$1.19 Rubinoff VodkaS.°. .oaf.  .*".?$3.95 80 PROOF, 7S0 ML. 00mmS z Crown ....... $5.95 Frito Lay O'Gradys no. su, Potato Chips .... : .:..?... 99’ Strawberry or Cherry Flavor REG. u' Jetlo ........... ,. ?z. 2169' 80 PROOF, 750 ML. Jack Daniels Black $8.95 Liver or Beef REG. w|rv • • • • • • Q • • • • • • • • • 7up, Diet 7up, ram. SLn Like & Diet Like ..... 99' De, Express Butcher Boy . ,r Burrit0....5, .°L Rp....R.w..OT..49  Open 7 days a week, 6:00 a.m. - 12:00 midnight Phone 288-3062 We Iwv. The Right to Undt, Quan’iti. wJnjlnulJlUJJllmxu Deft ,,, REG. $1.49 Ham Sandwich ............ 99 q (fries, salad, roll & butter) s7.9o vAtUE 2- 4pc. ChickenDinr$; .55.95 ..nu.. Three Fresh 75. vAU Hoi'N One Donuts 3/49 €