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Canton, Missouri
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April 6, 1978     Press-News Journal
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April 6, 1978
 

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Mrs. Norman (Julia) Tucker of receives large stuffed rabbit from James Variety Store. Mrs. Tucker won the bunny of jelly beans contest at the store. jelly beans, and the actual number was :e companies Unusual troubles think You've got "Why Don't You Do Some- guy who won stuffed and then (not to ;) go up own so rich Console a JUst been who these Paid ate? Is poured around 1977 Were Were, Well, the folks extra. who Were Will, the who :lay of up by after three on a up of or of the boat's the Without like r Whole thing to Help Me?" award for 1977. An Alabama driver happened upon a two-car accident being investigated by the police. Advised to back up by the officer on duty, the driver shifted into reverse and proceeded around the block. No problem here, except that he made the trip backwards, at 50 mph, smashing into two parked cars in the process. His defense: "I just did what  policeman id.y And they. t th6re's-norespect for law and order anymore. The "Always Make Sure You Know What You're Squeezing" trophy goes to an Aetna policyholder who was tortured by mosquitoes. In the middle of the night he leaped out of bed, and, unable to stand the torment any longer, sprayed the little winged devils into oblivion. You can imagine his surprise when, upon opening his baby blue eyes the next morning, he discovered he had sprayed the entire bedroom with red enamel paint -- not insecti- cide. Oh well, history is full of Pyrrhic victories. And here's an example we can all identify with --, love and devotion gone awry. One member of an appar- ently very happy couple loaned her car to the other loverbird in the early fall, with the understanding that he'd drive it cross-country and meet her soon for the nuptials. It took ti pogu/ lady several monthsqo [each the conclu- sion that her fiance had gone west with the car, apparently forgetting about the wedding. She filed a stolen car claim. Getting back to our first three cases of abandoned normalcy, the gambling en- thusiast headed for a race- track in the East and was YOUR ORDERS IN FOIl THE FAMOUS SEED CORN numbers are ava,lable, discount if picked up at Roach Canton . Ph. 288. 4419 Pothole patrol repairs winter.damaged roads The severe winter just ended has caused a heavier amount of weather damage than usual to the roads and bridge decks of the Missouri state highway system. Now that good weather appears to have arrived, all State Highway Department main- tenance personnel available except those on emergency assignments are busy filling the potholes which have been left in winter's wake. Included in this State Highway Depart- ment effort are over time work and week end work in those critical situations call- ing for such activity. Robert N. Hunter, chief engineer of the State Highway Depart- ment, has commented on the department's all-out efforts as follows: "as everybody knows, the winter through which we've just come was one of the most severe in Missouri history. And the extreme amounts of snow, moisture, and extreme cold and the chemicals we had to use as we attempted to keep the roads clear, really were hard on road surfaces and bridge decks. We always experience some winter dam- age to our highways and bridge decks. But the extent and severity of that damage in the winter just added were significantly greater than that with which we usually have to deal. Of course there was no way we could get repairs made until the snow, sleet and extreme cold ended. Now that they have, we're giving the repair of winter-caused pot- holes top priority." Hunter added that the repairs being made statewide are aimed at elimination of the most critical potholes in the shortest possible time. He said that more permanent and extensive repairs will be made to the winter-damaged roads and bridge decks during the summer, when weather conditions are more favorable for the making of such repairs Hunter pointed out that the priority status being given to the filling of potholes by State Highway Department main- tenance personnel will neces- sarily result in the delay of some other routine mainten- ance activities. Who is the spiller at your house? Are all the beverage glasses klutzy, waiting to be tipped over? A table cloth can catch a major part of the spill before it hits the floor. Table linens are easy to wash and use and economical- ly made from durable press sheets. Dyes are especially formulated to withstand many launderings. Polyester fiber content makes the fabric stronger. A double size flat sheet with wide hem ripped out can be torn in two, hemmed along raw edges for two table cloths. Sheets that size contain seven yards of fabric, 36 inch equivalent, and all seamless, suitable for round and oval table cloths or large decorator jrojects. Coordinated bed and "bath liriefis make attractive closet accessories, wall hang- ing, canopies, dust ruffles, etc. Color coordinates and prints offer the greatest opportun- ities since prints hide soil and stains to some extent. Finding a suitable pattern may re- quire shopping. A closely woven percale sheet offers longer wear and more body than a more loosely woven muslin. Food stains that are greasy cling to polyester fibers. Pretreatment with detergent or spray spotters usually solve the problem. Aresols force quite successful. He had the presence of mind to quickly conceal the winnings in his trousers. He than apparently got nervous, lit up a cigarette and proceeded to set his pants on fire, destroying the cash, the breeches, and, no doubt, his entire afternoon. We've heard of money burnin' a bole in some folks' pockets, but this is going a little too far! The Aetna claims represen- tatives were presented with the chef's piece de resistance in the form of a request for workers compensation reim- bursement. Seems like he tasted his own rich cheese sauces so often that he finally developed gout and found it hard to work. The imagination runs wild with the possibilities of excesses in other profes- sions. Then there's the case of the poor lady from New Jersey who had to explain how she was hit in the head by a toilet seat after walking under it. She entered a variety store only to be beaned by the seat which fell from an ov6rhead display. And they claim there's no more adventure in the world! Just to quell the rumors that backaches are a dead issue these days. we offer one final tale of woe. A mortician filed a claim seeking payment for a strain- ed back. Seems like business was so good he had loaded too man.,," caskets into his hearse. With all the troubles chron- icled here, it might be well to remember what an anony- mous author once wrote: "Trouble knocked at the door, but hearing a laugh within, hurried away." We'll keep that in mind during 1978! solvent between texturized polyester yarns and may be more effective. Enzyme pro- ducts break down protein stains found in meat, milk, eggs, blood and other stains of animal origin. These enzyeme products are packaged with detergent that helps soak away stains not affected by the enzymes themselves. Consumer chief says people know little about credit "Most consumers do not know enough about how credit charges are computed," ac- cording to State Consumer Affairs Director' James L. Sullivan. "Because of this confusion, too many consum- ers are paying more than they need to when they borrow or buy on credit," Sullivan said. To help consumers under- stand how credit works and avoid paying more than they need the Department of Consumer Affairs has prepar- ed "Before You Borrow, A Guide For Credit Shopping". The guide points out that the amount of outstanding credit and loan obligations for con- sumer purchases is at an all-time high with two out of every three households having some installment debt. "Unfortunately, many per- sons are paying more than necessary when they buy on credit," Sullivan said. "For a major purchase such as an automobile, differences in where and how one arranges for credit can result in savings as much as several hundred dollars," Sullivan said. The guide contains informa- tion about where credit and consumer loans are available, simple ways to compare interest rates among lenders and hog' to avoid charges for "extras" consumers may be abl6 to do without. The guide is available free by writing to: James L. Sullivan, Director, Missouri Dept. of Consumer Affairs, P.O. Box 1157, Jeffer- son City, MO 65101. AND ,.. it's a "mortgage" you can never pay off. So don't take chances on a ruinous t0ss if hail strikes YOUR crops this summer. Be prepared And be sure of ADEQUATE pro. tection with a Square Deal crop hail p0ficy. Fire and lightning coverage added at no extra cost $11 YOUR LOCAL AGINCY Now where is that egg? Canton youth enjoy Jaycee egg hunt Approximately 100 area youngsters undeterred by a week's postponement, invaded Canton's Bicentennial Park for the Canton Jaycee's first annual Easter egg hunt. Concealed among shrub- bery, trees, rocks, a fire engine and thousands of jelly beans were three specially marked "silver" eggs which could be redeemed for prizes. First prize, won by Lori Hudnutc was a $25.00 savings bond donated by the Canton State Bank. Tracie Staler won two free tickets to the Canton Theatre and Mary Wooley won one free ticket to the Canton Theatre. Also among the winners was a squirrel who risked being trampled by the horde in order to snatch a jelly bean from several startled Jaycees. According to a Jaycee spokesman, "The afternoon was such a success and the park picked so clean, that we're thinking very seriously of hiding some . specially marked redeemable beer cans at the Riverfront Park to see if Canton's older citizens are as litter-conscious as the kids." Late spring makes area gardens late by Kermit Hildahi bage, broccoli, cauliflower The long sustained period of and brussel sprouts. cold weather will make spring After the soil warms a bit, planting late. Many gardeners beets, carrots, potatoes and would ordinarily have made swiss chard can be planted. first plantings of early spring Crops like snap beans and vegetables, sweet corn can usually be COOl season crops can be. planted, jo:|t April " planted in the vegetable Warm weather crops should garden as soon as soil and weather conditions permit. Soils should not be worked when wet. Soil will dry to a cloddy, hard to manage condition if worked when wet. Before tilling, spading or plowing the garden for plant- ing, spread some well rotted manure, rotted sawdust, com- post or other organic matter. A two inch layer of organic matter, worked into the soil will do much to loosen the soil and make it more workable. Chemical fertilizer can be applied at the same time. The best way to determine how much is needed is to have a soil test done. University of Missouri Extenston Centers have instructions on taking soil samples and can test the soil, once the sample is taken. If no soil test is available, about 10.15 lbs. of a 5-10-5 or similar fertilizer can be applied to each I000 square feet of garden area. Early planted garden crops, include radishes, lettuce, spin- ach, peas, onions, turnips, kohlrabi and plants of cab- wait until the soil is thorough- ly warm and danger of frost is past. May 10-20 is usually an appropriate time for warm weather crops. Warm weather crops such as tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, melons, cucumbers, etc., can still be started from seed indoors. Since vine crops do. not transplant well if their roots are disturbed, they are best seeded in some structure such as compressed peat pellets or peat pots, which can be planted. ii i school's open drive carefully  "If we make an error Henry Vi, Block on your taxes, we pay the l00nalty. And the interest"' H&R Block doesn't make maaw mistakes. Our people are trained not to. But if we should make an error that costs you addi- tional tax, you pay only the tax. Block pays any penalty mad interest. We stand behind our work. That's Reason No. 14 why H&R Block should do your taxes. SHIRLEY SPURGEON S. Highway 61 Ph. 288-3508 Weekdays 10- 5 Saturdoys 9 - 5 Ill ] I I I H&R BLOCK THE INCOME TAX PEOPLE Canton youngsters enjoyed hunting for "'hidden eggs" even if it was a week after Easter. The Canton Jaycees held the eggs for the event Saturday at the Bicentennial Gardens, across from the post office. EGG ltUNTER -- Eighteen month old Unity Christian Smith of Canton spys a candy egg "over there" during the Easter Egg Hunt, sponsored by the Jaycees. The hunt was postponed one week due to the latest snow, Easter weekend. Once spring has sprung, the 7 '/ weather may turn warm and telescpe he spring chre tD@ into another. Therefore, early garden chores should be done as quickly as soil and weather CANTON, MO will permit. THURSDAY, APRIl, 6. 1978 II ]1 ]1 II For Sale BRUCE "88" TRUCK STOP LOCATION Eleven full city lots. Filling Station and Restaurant Building and Equipment. Located on south 4th St. Across the street (South) from City Park. Area is equivalent to 1.8a acres. All city utilities to site. Priced for easy sale. Call or write for information. FOR SALE Completely remodeled modern home. 6 rooms with bath. Gas furnace heat. Fully carpeted. New kitchen flooring. House in excellent condition. Immediate possession. 608 South 4th Street. $17,500.00. Easy commuting distance to Quincy, II!. or Keokuk, Iowa. Good Buy. FOR SALE ]97] Peerless 12 wide y 651et long mobile home. In elllent collitL ,2 bedrooms. Large livij[g_PoollajLbeJ . Gas heat. Home alreaet JrfiolJjjlOlme court pad. For sale atj[l i111. Owner deceased. Unit for sale byTfate. FOR SALE Four room frame home in good structural condition. Located on two full lots. Total area 112 feet front by 150 feet deep. Corner location on South 4th Street. Good highway business location. FOR SALE Five room frame house with attached garage. Fully modern. Full utilities. 1V2 lots. Immediate possession. Located 605 Jamison Street. $15,000.nn /fartmann Real Estate J. H. HARTMANN, BROKER PHONE 314.288. 5251 339 Lewis Street Canton, Mo. 63435 Mrs. Norman (Julia) Tucker of receives large stuffed rabbit from James Variety Store. Mrs. Tucker won the bunny of jelly beans contest at the store. jelly beans, and the actual number was :e companies Unusual troubles think You've got "Why Don't You Do Some- guy who won stuffed and then (not to ;) go up own so rich Console a JUst been who these Paid ate? Is poured around 1977 Were Were, Well, the folks extra. who Were Will, the who :lay of up by after three on a up of or of the boat's the Without like r Whole thing to Help Me?" award for 1977. An Alabama driver happened upon a two-car accident being investigated by the police. Advised to back up by the officer on duty, the driver shifted into reverse and proceeded around the block. No problem here, except that he made the trip backwards, at 50 mph, smashing into two parked cars in the process. His defense: "I just did what  policeman id.y And they. t th6re's-norespect for law and order anymore. The "Always Make Sure You Know What You're Squeezing" trophy goes to an Aetna policyholder who was tortured by mosquitoes. In the middle of the night he leaped out of bed, and, unable to stand the torment any longer, sprayed the little winged devils into oblivion. You can imagine his surprise when, upon opening his baby blue eyes the next morning, he discovered he had sprayed the entire bedroom with red enamel paint -- not insecti- cide. Oh well, history is full of Pyrrhic victories. And here's an example we can all identify with --, love and devotion gone awry. One member of an appar- ently very happy couple loaned her car to the other loverbird in the early fall, with the understanding that he'd drive it cross-country and meet her soon for the nuptials. It took ti pogu/ lady several monthsqo [each the conclu- sion that her fiance had gone west with the car, apparently forgetting about the wedding. She filed a stolen car claim. Getting back to our first three cases of abandoned normalcy, the gambling en- thusiast headed for a race- track in the East and was YOUR ORDERS IN FOIl THE FAMOUS SEED CORN numbers are ava,lable, discount if picked up at Roach Canton . Ph. 288. 4419 Pothole patrol repairs winter.damaged roads The severe winter just ended has caused a heavier amount of weather damage than usual to the roads and bridge decks of the Missouri state highway system. Now that good weather appears to have arrived, all State Highway Department main- tenance personnel available except those on emergency assignments are busy filling the potholes which have been left in winter's wake. Included in this State Highway Depart- ment effort are over time work and week end work in those critical situations call- ing for such activity. Robert N. Hunter, chief engineer of the State Highway Depart- ment, has commented on the department's all-out efforts as follows: "as everybody knows, the winter through which we've just come was one of the most severe in Missouri history. And the extreme amounts of snow, moisture, and extreme cold and the chemicals we had to use as we attempted to keep the roads clear, really were hard on road surfaces and bridge decks. We always experience some winter dam- age to our highways and bridge decks. But the extent and severity of that damage in the winter just added were significantly greater than that with which we usually have to deal. Of course there was no way we could get repairs made until the snow, sleet and extreme cold ended. Now that they have, we're giving the repair of winter-caused pot- holes top priority." Hunter added that the repairs being made statewide are aimed at elimination of the most critical potholes in the shortest possible time. He said that more permanent and extensive repairs will be made to the winter-damaged roads and bridge decks during the summer, when weather conditions are more favorable for the making of such repairs Hunter pointed out that the priority status being given to the filling of potholes by State Highway Department main- tenance personnel will neces- sarily result in the delay of some other routine mainten- ance activities. Who is the spiller at your house? Are all the beverage glasses klutzy, waiting to be tipped over? A table cloth can catch a major part of the spill before it hits the floor. Table linens are easy to wash and use and economical- ly made from durable press sheets. Dyes are especially formulated to withstand many launderings. Polyester fiber content makes the fabric stronger. A double size flat sheet with wide hem ripped out can be torn in two, hemmed along raw edges for two table cloths. Sheets that size contain seven yards of fabric, 36 inch equivalent, and all seamless, suitable for round and oval table cloths or large decorator jrojects. Coordinated bed and "bath liriefis make attractive closet accessories, wall hang- ing, canopies, dust ruffles, etc. Color coordinates and prints offer the greatest opportun- ities since prints hide soil and stains to some extent. Finding a suitable pattern may re- quire shopping. A closely woven percale sheet offers longer wear and more body than a more loosely woven muslin. Food stains that are greasy cling to polyester fibers. Pretreatment with detergent or spray spotters usually solve the problem. Aresols force quite successful. He had the presence of mind to quickly conceal the winnings in his trousers. He than apparently got nervous, lit up a cigarette and proceeded to set his pants on fire, destroying the cash, the breeches, and, no doubt, his entire afternoon. We've heard of money burnin' a bole in some folks' pockets, but this is going a little too far! The Aetna claims represen- tatives were presented with the chef's piece de resistance in the form of a request for workers compensation reim- bursement. Seems like he tasted his own rich cheese sauces so often that he finally developed gout and found it hard to work. The imagination runs wild with the possibilities of excesses in other profes- sions. Then there's the case of the poor lady from New Jersey who had to explain how she was hit in the head by a toilet seat after walking under it. She entered a variety store only to be beaned by the seat which fell from an ov6rhead display. And they claim there's no more adventure in the world! Just to quell the rumors that backaches are a dead issue these days. we offer one final tale of woe. A mortician filed a claim seeking payment for a strain- ed back. Seems like business was so good he had loaded too man.,," caskets into his hearse. With all the troubles chron- icled here, it might be well to remember what an anony- mous author once wrote: "Trouble knocked at the door, but hearing a laugh within, hurried away." We'll keep that in mind during 1978! solvent between texturized polyester yarns and may be more effective. Enzyme pro- ducts break down protein stains found in meat, milk, eggs, blood and other stains of animal origin. These enzyeme products are packaged with detergent that helps soak away stains not affected by the enzymes themselves. Consumer chief says people know little about credit "Most consumers do not know enough about how credit charges are computed," ac- cording to State Consumer Affairs Director' James L. Sullivan. "Because of this confusion, too many consum- ers are paying more than they need to when they borrow or buy on credit," Sullivan said. To help consumers under- stand how credit works and avoid paying more than they need the Department of Consumer Affairs has prepar- ed "Before You Borrow, A Guide For Credit Shopping". The guide points out that the amount of outstanding credit and loan obligations for con- sumer purchases is at an all-time high with two out of every three households having some installment debt. "Unfortunately, many per- sons are paying more than necessary when they buy on credit," Sullivan said. "For a major purchase such as an automobile, differences in where and how one arranges for credit can result in savings as much as several hundred dollars," Sullivan said. The guide contains informa- tion about where credit and consumer loans are available, simple ways to compare interest rates among lenders and hog' to avoid charges for "extras" consumers may be abl6 to do without. The guide is available free by writing to: James L. Sullivan, Director, Missouri Dept. of Consumer Affairs, P.O. Box 1157, Jeffer- son City, MO 65101. AND ,.. it's a "mortgage" you can never pay off. So don't take chances on a ruinous t0ss if hail strikes YOUR crops this summer. Be prepared And be sure of ADEQUATE pro. tection with a Square Deal crop hail p0ficy. Fire and lightning coverage added at no extra cost $11 YOUR LOCAL AGINCY Now where is that egg? Canton youth enjoy Jaycee egg hunt Approximately 100 area youngsters undeterred by a week's postponement, invaded Canton's Bicentennial Park for the Canton Jaycee's first annual Easter egg hunt. Concealed among shrub- bery, trees, rocks, a fire engine and thousands of jelly beans were three specially marked "silver" eggs which could be redeemed for prizes. First prize, won by Lori Hudnutc was a $25.00 savings bond donated by the Canton State Bank. Tracie Staler won two free tickets to the Canton Theatre and Mary Wooley won one free ticket to the Canton Theatre. Also among the winners was a squirrel who risked being trampled by the horde in order to snatch a jelly bean from several startled Jaycees. According to a Jaycee spokesman, "The afternoon was such a success and the park picked so clean, that we're thinking very seriously of hiding some . specially marked redeemable beer cans at the Riverfront Park to see if Canton's older citizens are as litter-conscious as the kids." Late spring makes area gardens late by Kermit Hildahi bage, broccoli, cauliflower The long sustained period of and brussel sprouts. cold weather will make spring After the soil warms a bit, planting late. Many gardeners beets, carrots, potatoes and would ordinarily have made swiss chard can be planted. first plantings of early spring Crops like snap beans and vegetables, sweet corn can usually be COOl season crops can be. planted, jo:|t April " planted in the vegetable Warm weather crops should garden as soon as soil and weather conditions permit. Soils should not be worked when wet. Soil will dry to a cloddy, hard to manage condition if worked when wet. Before tilling, spading or plowing the garden for plant- ing, spread some well rotted manure, rotted sawdust, com- post or other organic matter. A two inch layer of organic matter, worked into the soil will do much to loosen the soil and make it more workable. Chemical fertilizer can be applied at the same time. The best way to determine how much is needed is to have a soil test done. University of Missouri Extenston Centers have instructions on taking soil samples and can test the soil, once the sample is taken. If no soil test is available, about 10.15 lbs. of a 5-10-5 or similar fertilizer can be applied to each I000 square feet of garden area. Early planted garden crops, include radishes, lettuce, spin- ach, peas, onions, turnips, kohlrabi and plants of cab- wait until the soil is thorough- ly warm and danger of frost is past. May 10-20 is usually an appropriate time for warm weather crops. Warm weather crops such as tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, melons, cucumbers, etc., can still be started from seed indoors. Since vine crops do. not transplant well if their roots are disturbed, they are best seeded in some structure such as compressed peat pellets or peat pots, which can be planted. ii i school's open drive carefully  "If we make an error Henry Vi, Block on your taxes, we pay the l00nalty. And the interest"' H&R Block doesn't make maaw mistakes. Our people are trained not to. But if we should make an error that costs you addi- tional tax, you pay only the tax. Block pays any penalty mad interest. We stand behind our work. That's Reason No. 14 why H&R Block should do your taxes. SHIRLEY SPURGEON S. Highway 61 Ph. 288-3508 Weekdays 10- 5 Saturdoys 9 - 5 Ill ] I I I H&R BLOCK THE INCOME TAX PEOPLE Canton youngsters enjoyed hunting for "'hidden eggs" even if it was a week after Easter. The Canton Jaycees held the eggs for the event Saturday at the Bicentennial Gardens, across from the post office. EGG ltUNTER -- Eighteen month old Unity Christian Smith of Canton spys a candy egg "over there" during the Easter Egg Hunt, sponsored by the Jaycees. The hunt was postponed one week due to the latest snow, Easter weekend. Once spring has sprung, the 7 '/ weather may turn warm and telescpe he spring chre tD@ into another. Therefore, early garden chores should be done as quickly as soil and weather CANTON, MO will permit. THURSDAY, APRIl, 6. 1978 II ]1 ]1 II For Sale BRUCE "88" TRUCK STOP LOCATION Eleven full city lots. Filling Station and Restaurant Building and Equipment. Located on south 4th St. Across the street (South) from City Park. Area is equivalent to 1.8a acres. All city utilities to site. Priced for easy sale. Call or write for information. FOR SALE Completely remodeled modern home. 6 rooms with bath. Gas furnace heat. Fully carpeted. New kitchen flooring. House in excellent condition. Immediate possession. 608 South 4th Street. $17,500.00. Easy commuting distance to Quincy, II!. or Keokuk, Iowa. Good Buy. FOR SALE ]97] Peerless 12 wide y 651et long mobile home. In elllent collitL ,2 bedrooms. Large livij[g_PoollajLbeJ . Gas heat. Home alreaet JrfiolJjjlOlme court pad. For sale atj[l i111. Owner deceased. Unit for sale byTfate. FOR SALE Four room frame home in good structural condition. Located on two full lots. Total area 112 feet front by 150 feet deep. Corner location on South 4th Street. Good highway business location. FOR SALE Five room frame house with attached garage. Fully modern. Full utilities. 1V2 lots. Immediate possession. Located 605 Jamison Street. $15,000.nn /fartmann Real Estate J. H. HARTMANN, BROKER PHONE 314.288. 5251 339 Lewis Street Canton, Mo. 63435