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Canton, Missouri
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April 25, 1985     Press-News Journal
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April 25, 1985
 

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RIAL 8, OPINION - America at work for this year's National Small Business tells an exciting and accurate story. 14 million strong by U.S. Small Business employ about half the nation's Small businesses are the chief employers i old and of women. Small firms have been rolls at an unusually fast clip. Last are dominated by small businesses rate of about twice that of industries giants: 11.4 percent vs. 5.3 percent. II firms are creating more than their share innovation and entrepreneurship. An SBA firms move relatively quickly out of and move quickly into new and a record which helps America's and national productivity. Business Week is noted annually to pay the nation's small business community and small firms which have been unusually made outstanding contributions to their year, the Week is to be celebrated Ny 5-11. to salute our small entrepreneurs and in this year's theme: Small Business: i many selfless activities, and the achievements a bunch of ladies can accomplish in the name of a club organization. Wqtmt brhags all thfm to mired is Use fact that we filled ha setting some d Iwho maiued a wm'k to Imcaume Last column in Lewis "hateresttag and tie type this week, and straggled thnmgh the club news items. We were impressed with the projects of the groups, a! the beart-warmhag "tlmnk yam*' added to the  exlresshag alweehattm fw our effwts in rmmlug tlkem ha U palter, it is m"k nkef tbao demands tkgt club items be "put eu the from page whe evtn'yme can e them," w r several memhs We noted with a bit of mulmm the pauing of one of the clubs that has been faithfully reported in this paper for many, many years. The Mary- Martha Sunday School Class of Monticello held its last meeting, at which the members voted to discon- tmue the club, which was organized in Yesteryear's photo brings response Last week's Yesteryear's Picture of Sunnyside School unearthed additional information. Nevelyn Wolf meyer Feld- kamp. who was among those in the photo, recalled many of the names and the occasion, which was in the spring of 1940, she says instead of the 1930s. Mrs Feldkamp recalls the occasion was the last day of school, and a celebration noting the approaching marriage of the teacher, Rebecca Dawson. The two youngsters identified as "king and queen'" were represent- ing a bride and groom. Portraying a bridal couple were Phyllis Wieseman Merrell and Paul Wiseman. Others identified in the photo included Ebert Reiter, Marilyn Wolf- meyer Boyer, Carmeleta Wolfmeyer Liby, Genevieve Wolfmeyer Liby, Janeta Wolf meyer Liby, Robert Bergman, Glenn Maples (with basket- ball), Wayne Maples. Melvin Merrell, Hazel and Bert Wolfmeyer. Doras and Dana Wmseman, mothers of the children dressed as bride and groom, Sue Boudreau, Michael and Anna Wieseman, Wayne Bronestine, and Robert and Ronald Farr. Mrs. Feldkamp recalls that Miss Dawlmn taught for three years, and the event pictured was a happy one at which students, neighbors and friends gathered from around the area to bold a shower for the teacher. At Your Service Estil V. Fretwell oM that "'lave to be printed because go ha 00pbeel,.., NeW bills affect children and homeowners eemlJtlme running, e, In Mmm, pmpJe ram/rag ar, mul wi ImrrlUb m INuls. b from working h tlne prdem, and gram Umt meeds mowing. Tat, ye=r we m,ml te jump mr, cOy from winter to summer, with g ktgk temperatures fro- several days in April. A little too warm, maybe, but it sure beats m, velhag at the 1933. because of declining membership clubs ,.. to  and death. is exlp4an- they are test it of the ladies forim we feel them in this the only them! We for their more bills through the 18th Dist. Newsletter m State Senator Norman merrell prove strewing he/tais to keep track of released patients. Usually the only way the imKitutioo knows when former patients are having problems is if they get into trouble When considering the safety of the public. that's often too late. Under the propmed legislation, When a criminally insane persm is judged approval to iisa remaining bond, bond issue The boats and !buildings and Wojects. ijotB and booU taking care of the boeds lve m the budget. has lcture is has decided Two bills receiving first round approval in the House would have a great impact on children and homeowners in Missourl if they become law. Two years ago, legislation was passed which made joint custody an optkm in divorce eases. Joint custody obligates both parents to share information regarding the healt)t, education, and welfare of the child al to share equally in the responsibility d decisien-making. Xhe bill currently being considered takes this law a step further by requiring judge, to order joint custody unless such a settlement is not in the best interests of the child. Opponents of the bill claim that the o.m'ent law has not been given enough time to work. They claim that joint custody may remdt m a more unstable environment for the child if parents are in disagreement regarding child or if the child is shuttled ba and forth between parents. Supports of the bill claim that mandatory joint custody is the nezt best thing of the family living together. They say the bill would encourage divorced parents to cooperate in making decisions regarding the child and would assure the child frequent centaet with both parents. The other bill receiving initial appeal m, the House would repeal rite mechanic slein law and would eliminate the "double jeopardy" home owners face when contracting servicea for the home. Currently, a homeowner can be required to pay twice for work done once to the contractor, who completes Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, April 25, 1985, Page tl b 1 funds are of many fallen into example that need to address needs. even more a Senate ctosely crtminany no longer such moni_Aor. know they law has no THE haEgry face, in the many books Pubite shelved excerpts tbeOM Jokebeok, A D4m't Jut and Like It, AJke in llmmw ef ef Arcby "well", he or she could be granted "clinical parole" and closely super. ed to insure that release requirements are being met, such as taking medication. If the terms of the release are violated, an individual could be located by paUee and recommiUed for further treatment, this week would: --Allow the state toprovide grants engineering equllmea t at several state umiversity engineering sehnois. --Prohibit emptoyment discrimina- tmn because of age. --Regulate the use and sale of fireworks. --P,ovide more investment capital for new or innovative business ventlwes. and Mebltabel, Will Itge, Imterate Digest, Life ha a Putty Knife Facts-y, &tory i 8Shred it, A Cidtd,s Cmrd ef ttm.  Ptea Cne to OrderS.. I've  Get TWo Hands and i'm Busy Wr Tlmm, Eddie Comers Werki's Smk of Best Jus, Mmlr d the Mst II  Live WJek a Cate,d,eq Cat, and bnoh by melt famous humorists as Bennett Cerf. Don Marquis, H. Allen Smith, Chrtmopher Stodey and Sobers neath. sam aom, wUose upm,me, eaatankermm, quirky words have diueetod hundreds of ehartcters, Mgwip aml issues, does it in A Few Minutes wltlk Aady Rooney. With 2e YEAR8 AGO The Cant Pret-News a s, tm With the Mississippi River reaching an all-time high of 21.20 feet at Canton Wednesday morning, the ereat has not yet been reached. After reaching a 20.77 foot stage at Canton on April 16 and 17, the river dropped to I$. feet on April 23 before rising again. Over 150 people attended the open house held by the Canton Asseeiatka d the Becky Thatcher Area Girl Scout Council Sunday. Each of the four Girl Scout troops exhibited displaying craftwork done at four levels of Girl Scouting. Becky Blickhan's shell collection, Carol Ann Hurt's shell flowers and Vinnie Smith's stuffed animals focused attention on the Junior's table display and needlework done bY the girls under the direction of Mrs. James Ayers. The Seniors display included the "swap hat" made by Ginoy Richards at the 1962 Roundup in Vermont. Also enAiplay were some of the "swaps" Janet Glover and Barbara Richard, pan to ta to the Roundup in Idaho. Oe display table called "Memories" end one by Mrs. Harold Blickhan included scrapbooks showing the beginning of organized Girl Scong in Canton 16 years ago, together with pictures of troop activities in past yosrs when Mrs. Walter Day was the fu.st leler of an organiz troop and :the Canton Business and Preeasimmi Women's Club was the first sponsor. Pictured are the boys who received Webeio badges at a meeting Friday might They are Glenn Dorris, David Spicer, Tun Blackmore, Steve Wagner, Craig Myers, and Mike Dorris. Susie Bader was recently granted her citizenship papers .in special ceremonies at Hannibal. Miss Bader came to Lewis County from Germany ie March d 1. She was adopted by Lets Bader on April S, 1957, and has made her home with her. Canton High School music students reeelved four Is, four lls and two HIs ta state contests at Columbia. Those getting Is were Louise , Wands Bolyz, Grace Carpenter. Barbara Ktehards, Michelle Franks, Judy jjecampben and yn Smith. Mrs. Anna Muehe, e2, died at her home  Canton Apra u.  MiuRoae Smen( . of Palmyra dil Tuesday in the home of her niece, Mrs. David Howard. Lewb Cmlnty Jcmraat a , tm George , 77, died in B Hoepltal in Quincy April 19. A promhnnt farmer, he lived in Lewis County most of his life. He was a member of the LaGrange Presbyterian Church. Gerald White, 52. died at St. Mary Hospital in quincy April , as a result of injuries sustained while at work in LaGrange. He was a maintenance foreman at Gardner-Denver in La- Grange where he had been employed for 0 years. O. H. Mace, 67, died at his home in LaGrange April 15. He was in the plumbing and heating bine. Mr. and Mrs. Fioy S. Stith of Jerseyviile, Ill.,. will observe their golden wedding anniversary on May 9. Mr. and Mrs. Stith. now retired and liv in Jerseyviile since 1958, spent most of their 50 years farming in Missouri. Mrs. Fannie Turner Day, 83, died at her home in Monticello on April 25. Mr. Clarence) Day preceded her in the work, and once to the subamtra - Itr e,  supplies the materials -- Jf F a r m e r's contractor does not pay tbe sbe0atractor for the materials used. Journal the home, even though the homemmer ' has paid his debt in fuU to the cemraetor. If the homeowner refuses to pay the subcontractor, the hoUSe may be put up for public auction. Under the recently approved mes me,  can not be attached if the debt te the emtractor has been paid ia full. If the homeowner has made partial payment, a lien may be attached but would be exacted on a pro rata basis. Futhermore, the bill not only pro- tecta homeowners but deters contrac- tors from dodging their debts by declaring Such action to be "lien fraud," a felony. Proponents claim that not only is such a law more just but it will facilitate the practice of more responsible eredit4endi by building mqy arm,. AS always, I welcome any thoughts you may have on these and other piecm of leamion. Keith Wilkey Grants of farm equipment have new names Incredible changes sometimes take place even though it may be a long time. During World War II  which to some old-timers don't seem all that long ago), I was employed for a while in the Rock Island plant of the J. I. Case Company. The building was antiquated as. it seemed to me, was the entire operation. '*They're still living in the days of the Case steam eline," I thought. I soon quit my job at Case. With so much war work being done and so many young men in the military, changing jobs was as easy as walking out the door. A guy like me, with two children, at that time was not classified IA in the Selective Service System. Most every plant displayed signs, "Help Wanted." rueful, wise, common-sensical and always a joy to read, his essays explo the pleasures and frustrations of everyday life. This funny man articulates all the frustrations with modern life that the rest of us suffer with silence or mumbled oaths. Backward Glance, Pead Plonk I death in 1958. Their entire married life was spent on their farm near Lewlstown. Since Mr. Day's death, Mrs. Day has lived alone, near the home of her daughter, Mrs. Earl Veateh in Monticello. so YEARS AGO The Careen May !, IMS Mrs. Hannah Banner, 79, passed away April . She was a member of the Baptist Chtwch at Lewimown. Miss Maude Boltz closed another suecemful term of school at Augusta Thursday with a weiner and allew roast for her pupi and guests. Miss Boltz was offered the for another year, but refused to accept. Mrs. Henrietta Morrow, 8O, pamud away at her home one mile south of Williammown April U. "Red" Latham, the general engineer from the highway department, at Hannibal, was in Canton Monday on business in connection with the straightening out of Highway 96 near this place. The proposed road takes off quite a let of the land of Andy Zenge and some of the buildings will have to be moved off of the  right of way. As proposed most of the crooks and turns will be taken out of the road between Canton and the Wyaconda River. N. J. Wagner went to Sedalia Sattwday after the bomeld goods of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Patterson and family, who are moving into the Barnett property on South Cth Street, recently vacated by Mr. and Mrs. t.toyd Marks. Teachers have been elected to the following schools near Canton: Angus- ta, Mrs. Joe Grandmaff, Hardin, Miss Roberts Dawson: Melrose, Miss Lotus McClain; Hazel Grove, Miss Ruby Bland; Benjamin, Mrs. Lucy Hem- ming; High Hill, Mrs. Vira Vauglm; and Pink parlrte, Mtas Georgia g. Phillips. g@ YEAR8 AGO Tlue Lewis CamPy Junml May I, I James Burke was buried at LaBelle Saturday. He died at Kansas City, Kun. He spent most of his iifc around LaBelle and the past several years has been in different parts of the United States. George Alison, 64, died at Canton Monday at the home of his cousin, Mrs. M. L. Lewis. Miss Frankie Fee has accepted a posiUoo as teacher in the junior high school at Pekin. near Peoria for th ensuing year. Willlamstown Miss Gladys Fretwell has accepted the position as teacher at Nichols School for the next term. Willianu;town Cecil Hawkins closed a successful term of school at Dare. Deer Ridge Mrs. Trout, who has been makLg her home with George Roberts and family east of town while she was engaged as instructor at Walker School, closed a successful term Friday. Deer Ridge Miss Beryle Henderson closed a successful term of school April 24 with a program and basket dinner at Fair Oak. , Crc Rob Ray Jennings of lGrunge has bought the Canton Star Route of Clyde Underbrink and began carrying it Monday. Floyd Collins, cave exploror who !o his life when trapped in Slmd Cave by a rock fall and whose body was recovered after being prtsomed in the natural tomb for 2 months, wu buried on a small hill overlookhtt Crystal Cave Monday. Crystal Cave is 12 miles northwest from Cave City and wgs discovered by Collins. 7O YEARS AGO The Lew County Jom*mtl AWll X, tats We're now fully equipped to give people of Lewis County the best poible. (Have) New pre and folder and added a large ametmt ef new type , and a number of new case, to our shop. The Journal was started by Robert E. Hicks in 1877. From Hicks it passed into the hands ef Orcutt ned Bumhargar, later it was owned by rite lamented C. S. Orontt, paed from his hands to L. P. Roberts, then W. R. Hollister, Ben Alderton and from him to the present management. N. Ford and son, who opened a garage at Williamstown this season and are agents for automobiles, mid five cars during April. We call the attention of our readers to their new ad in this issue. Representative men in large num- bers from all parts of the country appeared before the County Court Tuesday and Wednesday  that protection in the wa of fire proof vaults, be provided for the county vaults. A road meeting was held at J. W. Lillard's north of Monticello Tuesday evening for the purpose of raising funds to get the road graded from Monticello to the Moody corner.  is a county seat road and is about fma- miles in length. The road has been graded from the Clark Otty line to the Mnody cornor. IN YEAR8 AGO The Lewis Eeanty Jmmud May I, 1885 Canton is building a new fence around its public square. on manet of the  mds ngalnu It. me Oatlng rtak quemon at Monticello seems to have taken a relapse and we hear no more of It. The town board should be petitioned to build a good stone crmming from the north court house gate to the bank. A crossing of good, flat limestone, of about 10 to 12 inches thickness and 0 inches in width, is badly needed, and should by all means be made. It is the main crossing of the town and the present one is practically no eroding at all. The'County Court was beeged ma Monday with petitions, asking for the erection of bridges petitioned were needed and should be erected, but that there was no money to build them with; and, as under the law, they could not increase the levy for this purpose, they were rendered powerless. Another jewel has been gathered to deck the Crown of Him who doeth 811 things well. On Wednesday, April 22, Engenia Nichols, daughter of William and Nannie Nichols. was taken away from this vale of tears and sighs, and pain and death, and gathered to that bright sphere above where reign the blessed in eternal glory. This sweet child had blossomed here by 12 summers to gladden the hearts of her fond parents. I then entered the employ of the International Harvester Company, Quad-Cities Tank Division at Betten- doff, la. I worked in the Department of Stores. I don't recall why I quit the Tank Arsenal, but I changed jobs again. I remained with the Harvester Company but was part of the work force of the Farmall Works in Rock Island. In i days Internatlonal dominat- ed the farm equipment industry. They were the unquestioned giant. John Deers, for more than a century a Moline name. was next, with Massey- Harris, Allis-Chalmers, j. I. Case, Minneapolis-Moline and Ford bunched dectly behind. After the war I was employed for the next 0 years by a solid and well-established John Deers dealer, Though we naturally plugged Ir product, we knew that International Harvester was the pace setter in the industry. Twenty-five years ago this spring I turned my back forever on the industrial and retail business and became a member of the Fourth Estate, as a general assignment reporter and farm editor for the Quincy Herald-Whig newspaper and after retirement, a columnist. Some years after leaving the farm implement business, I was appalled to discover that the once monolithic International Harvester Company was teetering on the brink of bunkruptey." They are still a bit wobbly. Incredible as it seemed to me, International farm tractors are no longer made at the Farmall Works. Still more incredible the plant is no longer owned by International. Today there is no Farmall Works. It now belongs to J I. Case Company. This reminds me of {he story of the turtle outrunning the rabbit. Still more dramatic is the fact that both J. I. Case and part o International's farm implement busi- ness is now owned by a Wall Street eunglomerate. In the meantime, John Deere, the butt of,many jokes in the old days because of their tWo-cylindor "'poppln' johnny," now stands head and shoulders above the rest of the farm equipment manufacturers. It took a long time.. ,most of 40 years. .for these transitions to occur. Even now many of us old timers can only shake our heads in disbelief. They say if you hang On long ettqlh you will live to see everything. I am' beginning to believe it. RIAL 8, OPINION - America at work for this year's National Small Business tells an exciting and accurate story. 14 million strong by U.S. Small Business employ about half the nation's Small businesses are the chief employers i old and of women. Small firms have been rolls at an unusually fast clip. Last are dominated by small businesses rate of about twice that of industries giants: 11.4 percent vs. 5.3 percent. II firms are creating more than their share innovation and entrepreneurship. An SBA firms move relatively quickly out of and move quickly into new and a record which helps America's and national productivity. Business Week is noted annually to pay the nation's small business community and small firms which have been unusually made outstanding contributions to their year, the Week is to be celebrated Ny 5-11. to salute our small entrepreneurs and in this year's theme: Small Business: i many selfless activities, and the achievements a bunch of ladies can accomplish in the name of a club organization. Wqtmt brhags all thfm to mired is Use fact that we filled ha setting some d Iwho maiued a wm'k to Imcaume Last column in Lewis "hateresttag and tie type this week, and straggled thnmgh the club news items. We were impressed with the projects of the groups, a! the beart-warmhag "tlmnk yam*' added to the  exlresshag alweehattm fw our effwts in rmmlug tlkem ha U palter, it is m"k nkef tbao demands tkgt club items be "put eu the from page whe evtn'yme can e them," w r several memhs We noted with a bit of mulmm the pauing of one of the clubs that has been faithfully reported in this paper for many, many years. The Mary- Martha Sunday School Class of Monticello held its last meeting, at which the members voted to discon- tmue the club, which was organized in Yesteryear's photo brings response Last week's Yesteryear's Picture of Sunnyside School unearthed additional information. Nevelyn Wolf meyer Feld- kamp. who was among those in the photo, recalled many of the names and the occasion, which was in the spring of 1940, she says instead of the 1930s. Mrs Feldkamp recalls the occasion was the last day of school, and a celebration noting the approaching marriage of the teacher, Rebecca Dawson. The two youngsters identified as "king and queen'" were represent- ing a bride and groom. Portraying a bridal couple were Phyllis Wieseman Merrell and Paul Wiseman. Others identified in the photo included Ebert Reiter, Marilyn Wolf- meyer Boyer, Carmeleta Wolfmeyer Liby, Genevieve Wolfmeyer Liby, Janeta Wolf meyer Liby, Robert Bergman, Glenn Maples (with basket- ball), Wayne Maples. Melvin Merrell, Hazel and Bert Wolfmeyer. Doras and Dana Wmseman, mothers of the children dressed as bride and groom, Sue Boudreau, Michael and Anna Wieseman, Wayne Bronestine, and Robert and Ronald Farr. Mrs. Feldkamp recalls that Miss Dawlmn taught for three years, and the event pictured was a happy one at which students, neighbors and friends gathered from around the area to bold a shower for the teacher. At Your Service Estil V. Fretwell oM that "'lave to be printed because go ha 00pbeel,.., NeW bills affect children and homeowners eemlJtlme running, e, In Mmm, pmpJe ram/rag ar, mul wi ImrrlUb m INuls. b from working h tlne prdem, and gram Umt meeds mowing. Tat, ye=r we m,ml te jump mr, cOy from winter to summer, with g ktgk temperatures fro- several days in April. A little too warm, maybe, but it sure beats m, velhag at the 1933. because of declining membership clubs ,.. to  and death. is exlp4an- they are test it of the ladies forim we feel them in this the only them! We for their more bills through the 18th Dist. Newsletter m State Senator Norman merrell prove strewing he/tais to keep track of released patients. Usually the only way the imKitutioo knows when former patients are having problems is if they get into trouble When considering the safety of the public. that's often too late. Under the propmed legislation, When a criminally insane persm is judged approval to iisa remaining bond, bond issue The boats and !buildings and Wojects. ijotB and booU taking care of the boeds lve m the budget. has lcture is has decided Two bills receiving first round approval in the House would have a great impact on children and homeowners in Missourl if they become law. Two years ago, legislation was passed which made joint custody an optkm in divorce eases. Joint custody obligates both parents to share information regarding the healt)t, education, and welfare of the child al to share equally in the responsibility d decisien-making. Xhe bill currently being considered takes this law a step further by requiring judge, to order joint custody unless such a settlement is not in the best interests of the child. Opponents of the bill claim that the o.m'ent law has not been given enough time to work. They claim that joint custody may remdt m a more unstable environment for the child if parents are in disagreement regarding child or if the child is shuttled ba and forth between parents. Supports of the bill claim that mandatory joint custody is the nezt best thing of the family living together. They say the bill would encourage divorced parents to cooperate in making decisions regarding the child and would assure the child frequent centaet with both parents. The other bill receiving initial appeal m, the House would repeal rite mechanic s lein law and would eliminate the "double jeopardy" home owners face when contracting servicea for the home. Currently, a homeowner can be required to pay twice for work done once to the contractor, who completes Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, April 25, 1985, Page tl b 1 funds are of many fallen into example that need to address needs. even more a Senate ctosely crtminany no longer such moni_Aor. know they law has no THE haEgry face, in the many books Pubite shelved excerpts tbeOM Jokebeok, A D4m't Jut and Like It, AJke in llmmw ef ef Arcby "well", he or she could be granted "clinical parole" and closely super. ed to insure that release requirements are being met, such as taking medication. If the terms of the release are violated, an individual could be located by paUee and recommiUed for further treatment, this week would: --Allow the state toprovide grants engineering equllmea t at several state umiversity engineering sehnois. --Prohibit emptoyment discrimina- tmn because of age. --Regulate the use and sale of fireworks. --P,ovide more investment capital for new or innovative business ventlwes. and Mebltabel, Will Itge, Imterate Digest, Life ha a Putty Knife Facts-y, &tory i 8Shred it, A Cidtd,s Cmrd ef ttm.  Ptea Cne to OrderS.. I've  Get TWo Hands and i'm Busy Wr Tlmm, Eddie Comers Werki's Smk of Best Jus, Mmlr d the Mst II  Live WJek a Cate,d,eq Cat, and bnoh by melt famous humorists as Bennett Cerf. Don Marquis, H. Allen Smith, Chrtmopher Stodey and Sobers neath. sam aom, wUose upm,me, eaatankermm, quirky words have diueetod hundreds of ehartcters, Mgwip aml issues, does it in A Few Minutes wltlk Aady Rooney. With 2e YEAR8 AGO The Cant Pret-News a s, tm With the Mississippi River reaching an all-time high of 21.20 feet at Canton Wednesday morning, the ereat has not yet been reached. After reaching a 20.77 foot stage at Canton on April 16 and 17, the river dropped to I$. feet on April 23 before rising again. Over 150 people attended the open house held by the Canton Asseeiatka d the Becky Thatcher Area Girl Scout Council Sunday. Each of the four Girl Scout troops exhibited displaying craftwork done at four levels of Girl Scouting. Becky Blickhan's shell collection, Carol Ann Hurt's shell flowers and Vinnie Smith's stuffed animals focused attention on the Junior's table display and needlework done bY the girls under the direction of Mrs. James Ayers. The Seniors display included the "swap hat" made by Ginoy Richards at the 1962 Roundup in Vermont. Also enAiplay were some of the "swaps" Janet Glover and Barbara Richard, pan to ta to the Roundup in Idaho. Oe display table called "Memories" end one by Mrs. Harold Blickhan included scrapbooks showing the beginning of organized Girl Scong in Canton 16 years ago, together with pictures of troop activities in past yosrs when Mrs. Walter Day was the fu.st leler of an organiz troop and :the Canton Business and Preeasimmi Women's Club was the first sponsor. Pictured are the boys who received Webeio badges at a meeting Friday might They are Glenn Dorris, David Spicer, Tun Blackmore, Steve Wagner, Craig Myers, and Mike Dorris. Susie Bader was recently granted her citizenship papers .in special ceremonies at Hannibal. Miss Bader came to Lewis County from Germany ie March d 1. She was adopted by Lets Bader on April S, 1957, and has made her home with her. Canton High School music students reeelved four Is, four lls and two HIs ta state contests at Columbia. Those getting Is were Louise , Wands Bolyz, Grace Carpenter. Barbara Ktehards, Michelle Franks, Judy jjecampben and yn Smith. Mrs. Anna Muehe, e2, died at her home  Canton Apra u.  MiuRoae Smen( . of Palmyra dil Tuesday in the home of her niece, Mrs. David Howard. Lewb Cmlnty Jcmraat a , tm George , 77, died in B Hoepltal in Quincy April 19. A promhnnt farmer, he lived in Lewis County most of his life. He was a member of the LaGrange Presbyterian Church. Gerald White, 52. died at St. Mary Hospital in quincy April , as a result of injuries sustained while at work in LaGrange. He was a maintenance foreman at Gardner-Denver in La- Grange where he had been employed for 0 years. O. H. Mace, 67, died at his home in LaGrange April 15. He was in the plumbing and heating bine. Mr. and Mrs. Fioy S. Stith of Jerseyviile, Ill.,. will observe their golden wedding anniversary on May 9. Mr. and Mrs. Stith. now retired and liv in Jerseyviile since 1958, spent most of their 50 years farming in Missouri. Mrs. Fannie Turner Day, 83, died at her home in Monticello on April 25. Mr. Clarence) Day preceded her in the work, and once to the subamtra - Itr e,  supplies the materials -- Jf F a r m e r's contractor does not pay tbe sbe0atractor for the materials used. Journal the home, even though the homemmer ' has paid his debt in fuU to the cemraetor. If the homeowner refuses to pay the subcontractor, the hoUSe may be put up for public auction. Under the recently approved mes me,  can not be attached if the debt te the emtractor has been paid ia full. If the homeowner has made partial payment, a lien may be attached but would be exacted on a pro rata basis. Futhermore, the bill not only pro- tecta homeowners but deters contrac- tors from dodging their debts by declaring Such action to be "lien fraud," a felony. Proponents claim that not only is such a law more just but it will facilitate the practice of more responsible eredit4endi by building mqy arm,. AS always, I welcome any thoughts you may have on these and other piecm of leamion. Keith Wilkey Grants of farm equipment have new names Incredible changes sometimes take place even though it may be a long time. During World War II  which to some old-timers don't seem all that long ago), I was employed for a while in the Rock Island plant of the J. I. Case Company. The building was antiquated as. it seemed to me, was the entire operation. '*They're still living in the days of the Case steam eline," I thought. I soon quit my job at Case. With so much war work being done and so many young men in the military, changing jobs was as easy as walking out the door. A guy like me, with two children, at that time was not classified IA in the Selective Service System. Most every plant displayed signs, "Help Wanted." rueful, wise, common-sensical and always a joy to read, his essays explo the pleasures and frustrations of everyday life. This funny man articulates all the frustrations with modern life that the rest of us suffer with silence or mumbled oaths. Backward Glance, Pead Plonk I death in 1958. Their entire married life was spent on their farm near Lewlstown. Since Mr. Day's death, Mrs. Day has lived alone, near the home of her daughter, Mrs. Earl Veateh in Monticello. so YEARS AGO The Careen May !, IMS Mrs. Hannah Banner, 79, passed away April . She was a member of the Baptist Chtwch at Lewimown. Miss Maude Boltz closed another suecemful term of school at Augusta Thursday with a weiner and allew roast for her pupi and guests. Miss Boltz was offered the for another year, but refused to accept. Mrs. Henrietta Morrow, 8O, pamud away at her home one mile south of Williammown April U. "Red" Latham, the general engineer from the highway department, at Hannibal, was in Canton Monday on business in connection with the straightening out of Highway 96 near this place. The proposed road takes off quite a let of the land of Andy Zenge and some of the buildings will have to be moved off of the  right of way. As proposed most of the crooks and turns will be taken out of the road between Canton and the Wyaconda River. N. J. Wagner went to Sedalia Sattwday after the bomeld goods of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Patterson and family, who are moving into the Barnett property on South Cth Street, recently vacated by Mr. and Mrs. t.toyd Marks. Teachers have been elected to the following schools near Canton: Angus- ta, Mrs. Joe Grandmaff, Hardin, Miss Roberts Dawson: Melrose, Miss Lotus McClain; Hazel Grove, Miss Ruby Bland; Benjamin, Mrs. Lucy Hem- ming; High Hill, Mrs. Vira Vauglm; and Pink parlrte, Mtas Georgia g. Phillips. g@ YEAR8 AGO Tlue Lewis CamPy Junml May I, I James Burke was buried at LaBelle Saturday. He died at Kansas City, Kun. He spent most of his iifc around LaBelle and the past several years has been in different parts of the United States. George Alison, 64, died at Canton Monday at the home of his cousin, Mrs. M. L. Lewis. Miss Frankie Fee has accepted a posiUoo as teacher in the junior high school at Pekin. near Peoria for th ensuing year. Willlamstown Miss Gladys Fretwell has accepted the position as teacher at Nichols School for the next term. Willianu;town Cecil Hawkins closed a successful term of school at Dare. Deer Ridge Mrs. Trout, who has been makLg her home with George Roberts and family east of town while she was engaged as instructor at Walker School, closed a successful term Friday. Deer Ridge Miss Beryle Henderson closed a successful term of school April 24 with a program and basket dinner at Fair Oak. , Crc Rob Ray Jennings of lGrunge has bought the Canton Star Route of Clyde Underbrink and began carrying it Monday. Floyd Collins, cave exploror who !o his life when trapped in Slmd Cave by a rock fall and whose body was recovered after being prtsomed in the natural tomb for 2 months, wu buried on a small hill overlookhtt Crystal Cave Monday. Crystal Cave is 12 miles northwest from Cave City and wgs discovered by Collins. 7O YEARS AGO The Lew County Jom*mtl AWll X, tats We're now fully equipped to give people of Lewis County the best poible. (Have) New pre and folder and added a large ametmt ef new type , and a number of new case, to our shop. The Journal was started by Robert E. Hicks in 1877. From Hicks it passed into the hands ef Orcutt ned Bumhargar, later it was owned by rite lamented C. S. Orontt, paed from his hands to L. P. Roberts, then W. R. Hollister, Ben Alderton and from him to the present management. N. Ford and son, who opened a garage at Williamstown this season and are agents for automobiles, mid five cars during April. We call the attention of our readers to their new ad in this issue. Representative men in large num- bers from all parts of the country appeared before the County Court Tuesday and Wednesday  that protection in the wa of fire proof vaults, be provided for the county vaults. A road meeting was held at J. W. Lillard's north of Monticello Tuesday evening for the purpose of raising funds to get the road graded from Monticello to the Moody corner.  is a county seat road and is about fma- miles in length. The road has been graded from the Clark Otty line to the Mnody cornor. IN YEAR8 AGO The Lewis Eeanty Jmmud May I, 1885 Canton is building a new fence around its public square. on manet of the  mds ngalnu It. me Oatlng rtak quemon at Monticello seems to have taken a relapse and we hear no more of It. The town board should be petitioned to build a good stone crmming from the north court house gate to the bank. A crossing of good, flat limestone, of about 10 to 12 inches thickness and 0 inches in width, is badly needed, and should by all means be made. It is the main crossing of the town and the present one is practically no eroding at all. The'County Court was beeged ma Monday with petitions, asking for the erection of bridges petitioned were needed and should be erected, but that there was no money to build them with; and, as under the law, they could not increase the levy for this purpose, they were rendered powerless. Another jewel has been gathered to deck the Crown of Him who doeth 811 things well. On Wednesday, April 22, Engenia Nichols, daughter of William and Nannie Nichols. was taken away from this vale of tears and sighs, and pain and death, and gathered to that bright sphere above where reign the blessed in eternal glory. This sweet child had blossomed here by 12 summers to gladden the hearts of her fond parents. I then entered the employ of the International Harvester Company, Quad-Cities Tank Division at Betten- doff, la. I worked in the Department of Stores. I don't recall why I quit the Tank Arsenal, but I changed jobs again. I remained with the Harvester Company but was part of the work force of the Farmall Works in Rock Island. In i days Internatlonal dominat- ed the farm equipment industry. They were the unquestioned giant. John Deers, for more than a century a Moline name. was next, with Massey- Harris, Allis-Chalmers, j. I. Case, Minneapolis-Moline and Ford bunched dectly behind. After the war I was employed for the next 0 years by a solid and well-established John Deers dealer, Though we naturally plugged Ir product, we knew that International Harvester was the pace setter in the industry. Twenty-five years ago this spring I turned my back forever on the industrial and retail business and became a member of the Fourth Estate, as a general assignment reporter and farm editor for the Quincy Herald-Whig newspaper and after retirement, a columnist. Some years after leaving the farm implement business, I was appalled to discover that the once monolithic International Harvester Company was teetering on the brink of bunkruptey." They are still a bit wobbly. Incredible as it seemed to me, International farm tractors are no longer made at the Farmall Works. Still more incredible the plant is no longer owned by International. Today there is no Farmall Works. It now belongs to J I. Case Company. This reminds me of {he story of the turtle outrunning the rabbit. Still more dramatic is the fact that both J. I. Case and part o International's farm implement busi- ness is now owned by a Wall Street eunglomerate. In the meantime, John Deere, the butt of,many jokes in the old days because of their tWo-cylindor "'poppln' johnny," now stands head and shoulders above the rest of the farm equipment manufacturers. It took a long time.. ,most of 40 years. .for these transitions to occur. Even now many of us old timers can only shake our heads in disbelief. They say if you hang On long ettqlh you will live to see everything. I am' beginning to believe it.