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July 25, 1985     Press-News Journal
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ITORIAL & OPINION Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo.. Thursday, July 25, 1985, Page Ib Lg our heritage... 'fhlt annual,, River ii ,sadsehedule4 for this Up and Down the Countryside two of Canton's most are celebrating this weekend, e festivities with open ',sad Lewis Coanty SO years of am'routing mew Ims,,,esses tad many older from the scene, these Imsinesses threqh four wars, disasters, Bring part of the officers and State Bank, and of Lewis on their and join with their individual the stabfllsers and Cantm still College, d secupled the bill David Steinbeck overlooklng the town since I; The Press-News Jeurnal, which traces its beginnings back to 18U; Standard Machine Company, Cspps Store, Grand Leader Pharmacy, Ayers OH Co., and several others who have enviable records of durability. Many have changed and adapted to the times, as a business must to survive. The blacksmith shop becomes the machine shop, technology catches up with the newspaper, the bank, and other bineues which fred themselves in the midst of the computer age. But the keynote of service to the people is the secret of success. Celebrate Canton River Heritage Day There are many thlnp to do for kids of all ages. Take s moment to celebrate in the aeblevements of these businesses and peeple who serve the community. at. Panels think that seuion is over the is finished The council replaces the old Missouri Commission on the Status of Women, which has had very little statutory authority and has been generally unsuccessful in addressing the needs of women in the work force. The new program is better equipped to help women find success in the working world. I also will be working as a member of the Transportation Development Commission to oversee the operations of the new state Transportation Division - an agency set up to help enhance the economic development of Missouri through improved transporta- tion services. The commission will keep a close eye on the development of transporta- tion regulations and will consider the reconvenes need for new or changed laws relating from true. to the development and regulation of that keep sessions. And on special or services. Legislature work the regular that laws are ways that will to which I appointed will be a more favorable the state and growth. new Missouri Economic De- I will help to help women and to to nontradition- COuncil also will programs and provide promotes job and transportation activities. A third panel with which I will be working will be studying problems to medical malpractice and product liability in the state. The number of lawsuits against doctors and surgeons for medical malpractice has skyrocketed in recent years along with those filed under our product liability laws. It has resulted in two major problems. First, medical professionals and businesses are forced to pay unbelievably high liability insurance premiums - if they can obtain coverage at all. Secondly, these costs are passed directly to patients and consumers in the form of steadily increasing prices for health care service and retail goods. I know many of you are concerned about the rising costs and will agree that it's a very serious problem. The special study committee will explore both issues and make recommendations to the general Assembly next session for any legislative action that might ease the ,- situation. a in O Danfor(h afford _ to reduce simply does s most serious of $200 billion see. by the of Represen- the goal of from next We would settle m prngress on for as m spending in- At each politically be made if progress 00tween Senate for military chose the the Senate. between the on whether delay in retire- and the no question of taxes, the agreement would rule out any increase in revenues. This is not deficit reduction. Instead, this is a decision that deficit reduction is less important than military spending. It is a decision that deficit reduction is less important than full and immediate cost-of-living increases for domestic entitlement programs. Finally, it is a decision that deficit reduction is less important than avoiding a tax increase. After selling out the chance for a decent start toward a balanced budget, the House leaders had the gall to suggest that we would come up with "other spending reductions" sufficient to reach the original target. Baloney. Smoke and mirrors. To the House, I say: Show me the $20 billion in new spending reduction that the House witl support. The "compromise" departs from the judgment of every reputable economist who has testified before Congress. To a person, the nation's most eminent economists -- Republicans, Democrats and independents  tell us that the deficits are ruining the economy. They agree that a deficit reduction of between $50 billion and $60 billion will cut interest rates by at least two percentage points, increase our exports, reduce imports, stimulate housing and take some of the heat off farmers. Consider the question of America's, position ill world trade. At a time of record deficits in our trade balances, we would turn our back on the single most effective remedy for anemic exports and heavy imports: a meaningful reduction in the federal deficit. In the long term, $200 billion deficits will ruin the American economy. We cannot live beyond our means forever, making it from one year to the next by piling a new mortgage of $200 billion on our children and grandchildren. ,w / -% 1 YESTERYEAR'S PICTURES I II Backward Glances Pearl Plank 2O YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News July 29, lf Raymond B. Greene, of Balboa, Canal Zone, has been named instructor in English-Speech and Drama at Culver-stockton College. Mr. Gresv will replace Lawrence Fischer, who has resigned. The annual Lewis County 4-H Show attracted a large crowd this past weekend on the Canton School grounds. Representatives from nine states attended the second biennial meeting of the American Pencil Collectors Society held on the campus of Culver- Stockton College July 20-22. Those traveling the most miles to attend the convention were from San Jose, Calif., and Van Nuys, Calif., while the state with the most representatives was Illinois. The other states represented were Missouri, Indiana, South Dakota, Kansas, Iowa, Pennsylvania and Ohio. All national officers were re-elected for the next two years. They were Lester C. Taylor, Sterling, Kans., president; Aubrey N. Allen, Canton, vice-president; and Mrs. Paul R. Young, Hutchinson, Kans., secretary. Mr. Taylor, professor of religion and philosophy at Sterling College, proba- bly has the largest single collation of writing instruments in existence, over 53,000. Turley & Jones of Canton is this week advertising a sale in celebration of its 50th anniversary in Canton. In 1916 Mr. Turley bega the operation of a dry goods store with Miss Ella Jones as a partner under the trade name of Turley and Jones. In 1937 Mrs. Rosenthal became associated with the business. Mr. Turley died April 29, 1941. Miss Ella Jones is now inactive in the business, making her home at the Good Samaritan Home in Quincy. Mrs. Resenthal now operates the store with the aid of Mrs. Russell Burk who has been with her for eight years. Mrs. Harry Cottrell, 94, died July 27 in st. Mary t00q)i00 in quincy. Mrs. Cottrell had lived in Canton for the last 10 years. The Lewis CAmaty Journal Jnly 2O, I Basil Fountain, president of the LaBelle Rodeo Association, has announced that plans have been completed for the lh annual LaBelle Rodeo to be held at the LaBelle Rodeo arena Friday and Saturday evenings, August 6 and 7. The Diamond Horseshoe Rodeo company of Godfrey, III., is producing the rodeo and will furnishy stock for the_ events. F. B. (Fritz) Conrath, 64, died in Blessing Hospital, Quincy, July 21, where he had been a patient only a few hours. Mr. Conrath, a widely known and respected Lewis Countlan, served the county as Representative in the Missouri Legislature for two terms. He had been employed by the state revenue department for 27 years. He was a member of the Ewing Baptist Church. Caril Dee Tucker of Williamstown is pictured with her grand champion steer at the 4-H Show. The champion steer brought I1 a hundred at the sale and was purchased by four Canton businessmen, IGA, Dog 'n' Suds, Green's Dairy and J Andy Zenge, Jr. Two lovely Lewis County 4-H girls were selected at the annual 4-H Show to represent this county at the District Dress Revue at Kirksville on August 13. They are Karen Uhlmeyer and Jeanne Howard. National Grange Lecturer William Brake of Michigan and Washington, D.C., will direct the first Mid-west Grange Lecturer Conference and Family Camporee August 5-7. Missouri State Grange is host for the conference and has chosen Garnett Grange Hall in Lewis County as the site. The First Baptist Church of stown has called Rev. Loyle Van Horn as their pastor, coming from the First Baptist Church of Mundelein, m. Rev. Van Horn has pastored churches in Texas and Missouri. SO YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News August 1, 193.5 Mrs. Amanda Vice, 72, died July 27 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Herbert Wolf. Richard Tillmann is an artist in making articles from wood with a knife. He has whittled out several desk lamps that are beautiful, but his latest effort far surpassed these. He has on display in the Canton Hardware Store window a floor lamp cut from a single piece of cedar with a pocket knife. Dr. Walter Williams, 71, founder of the first school of journalism at the University of Missmu and president of the university until last July 1, died at his home in Columbia Monday, Miss Mada McCutchan, who is principal of the Girls' School in Susteln, China, arrived home Monday to spend her fwst vacation in six years. Miss Mada and hrother, Hugh, have represented the Presbyterian Church in the mission field in China the past 24 years Monticello Mrs. Lucy Hemming is trying to make the Benjamin school approved This picture, loaned by Loretta Bringer, Maywood, shows the congre- gation of the South Union Baptist Church in Maywood at about 1893. This picture was one of several on display at the church- the only one in Maywood --this weekend during the by September. Tuesday she and Miss Mary Alderton worked in classifying the library - a requirement in an approved rural school, Bertram the implement man, sold and delivered a new ten-foot power binder to Rice McCutchan early Tuesday. It was a hurry-up trans- action. YEARS AGO The Lewht County Journal July 31, 19'?.5 T. I. Johnson has purchased a controlling interest in the LaGrange Savings Bank. Mr. Johnson purchased a majority of the stock from F. S. Hagood, who has been cashier for some years. Mr. Johnson has been vice president of Monticello Trust Company since its origin and will retain that position. The Keokuk Canning Company is largely increasing its pickle capacity at Canton. There will be 7 new 14 foot tanks of over 1400 bushel capacity. The hotel at LaBelle, one of the oldest, burned down by a fire of unknown origin Monday morning. It was owned by J. R. Bertram of Rutledge. Leslie Hicks was killed Sunday near Edina when the car he was driving ran into a culvert as Mr. Hicks looked back to view another accident. stute Co. of St. Louis, who owns the pickle factory at this place, has Johnie Lemen employed as manager. They have the past week received their first pickles of the season and are paying $1.20 per bushel for small and 30c per bushel for the large ones. Durham N. J. Wagner of Benjamin hauled J. L. McCann's household goods to K/rksville Thursday. Lewistown Robert Boulware of Canton pur- chased at a trustee sale the  acre Vandivef farm located in the limits of Canton for $17,600. Cora Florence Fee Gray, 55, of Gray, Okla., departed this life July 18. The remains were brought to the old home place now owned by her brother, C. E. Fee, of Wil]iamstown where funeral services were conducted by J. V. Carlisle, after which they were laid to rest in the Carlin Cemetery. 70 YEARS AGO The Lewis Couuty Jourual July N, 115 As auistant high school teacher, the board has selected Prof. O. B. Eddins of Knox County. The remains of Mrs. Sidney Faulkner who died at her home in Hannibal Monday, were brought to Monticello and interred in the cemetery at this place Wednesday. Mrs. Faulkner was a sister of Charles E. Taylor of this place. celebration of the 125th year of that church. The Star-of-David stained glass windows pictured here are still present today. Much of the rest of the architecture is still the same, but the bell tower has been shortened. Monticello now has a well organized baseball team. Erie Knight, mger; David L. Breding catcher; M. Spurgeon, pitcher; Alfred WrighL Ist base; Jesse Sebork, captain, 2nd base; Pearl Anderson, 3rd base; Ernest Mitchell, short stop; Joe Story, left field; Prank Glaves, center field; and Charley Sehork, right field. At an estimated cost of $1,500 per mile a rocked road is to be constructed between Williamstown and Canton, a distance of 21 miles. Six miles have already been rocked from Canton. These two towns and the people along the highway gave upwards of $3,000 b build a dirt road between the two places and they have a good road. The day is not far distant when they will have the rock road. lOO YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal July 31, 1885 When in Canton the other day we were struck with the imposing appearance of J. C. Comle's large new warehouse, situated on the corner of Lewis and Ist Streets. We had  thought the old warehouse large and commodious enough for all purpose. but were informed that the increasing trade had given demand for more room and greater facilities for storage. The new warehouse is S6xt feet, most substantially erected with iron roof and ends, and has a capacity for the storage of 750 tons of hay. Prof. Anderson, principal of Western Academy, LaBelle, has secured the services of Prof. A. W. Lyon, an alumnus of the Missouri University and a teacher of ripe experience. Mrs. Annie Ringer has charge of the music department. Miss Bessie Nelson has charge of the school of art and is fully competent to give lessons in oli painting, crayon work, water colers, hammered brass, etc. Prof. Anderson, by his earnest, thorough work, has established an enviable reputation for * Western Academy and the people realize that this school is inferior to none for economy, moral restrat, and the success of its students., Died- at her home near Tolone on July 15, Miss Mary Kirschba, daughter of William and Katie Kirschbaum. / ITORIAL & OPINION Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo.. Thursday, July 25, 1985, Page Ib Lg our heritage... 'fhlt annual,, River ii ,sadsehedule4 for this Up and Down the Countryside two of Canton's most are celebrating this weekend, e festivities with open ',sad Lewis Coanty SO years of am'routing mew Ims,,,esses tad many older from the scene, these Imsinesses threqh four wars, disasters, Bring part of the officers and State Bank, and of Lewis on their and join with their individual the stabfllsers and Cantm still College, d secupled the bill David Steinbeck overlooklng the town since I; The Press-News Jeurnal, which traces its beginnings back to 18U; Standard Machine Company, Cspps Store, Grand Leader Pharmacy, Ayers OH Co., and several others who have enviable records of durability. Many have changed and adapted to the times, as a business must to survive. The blacksmith shop becomes the machine shop, technology catches up with the newspaper, the bank, and other bineues which fred themselves in the midst of the computer age. But the keynote of service to the people is the secret of success. Celebrate Canton River Heritage Day There are many thlnp to do for kids of all ages. Take s moment to celebrate in the aeblevements of these businesses and peeple who serve the community. at. Panels think that seuion is over the is finished The council replaces the old Missouri Commission on the Status of Women, which has had very little statutory authority and has been generally unsuccessful in addressing the needs of women in the work force. The new program is better equipped to help women find success in the working world. I also will be working as a member of the Transportation Development Commission to oversee the operations of the new state Transportation Division - an agency set up to help enhance the economic development of Missouri through improved transporta- tion services. The commission will keep a close eye on the development of transporta- tion regulations and will consider the reconvenes need for new or changed laws relating from true. to the development and regulation of that keep sessions. And on special or services. Legislature work the regular that laws are ways that will to which I appointed will be a more favorable the state and growth. new Missouri Economic De- I will help to help women and to to nontradition- COuncil also will programs and provide promotes job and transportation activities. A third panel with which I will be working will be studying problems to medical malpractice and product liability in the state. The number of lawsuits against doctors and surgeons for medical malpractice has skyrocketed in recent years along with those filed under our product liability laws. It has resulted in two major problems. First, medical professionals and businesses are forced to pay unbelievably high liability insurance premiums - if they can obtain coverage at all. Secondly, these costs are passed directly to patients and consumers in the form of steadily increasing prices for health care service and retail goods. I know many of you are concerned about the rising costs and will agree that it's a very serious problem. The special study committee will explore both issues and make recommendations to the general Assembly next session for any legislative action that might ease the ,- situation. a in O Danfor(h afford _ to reduce simply does s most serious of $200 billion see. by the of Represen- the goal of from next We would settle m prngress on for as m spending in- At each politically be made if progress 00tween Senate for military chose the the Senate. between the on whether delay in retire- and the no question of taxes, the agreement would rule out any increase in revenues. This is not deficit reduction. Instead, this is a decision that deficit reduction is less important than military spending. It is a decision that deficit reduction is less important than full and immediate cost-of-living increases for domestic entitlement programs. Finally, it is a decision that deficit reduction is less important than avoiding a tax increase. After selling out the chance for a decent start toward a balanced budget, the House leaders had the gall to suggest that we would come up with "other spending reductions" sufficient to reach the original target. Baloney. Smoke and mirrors. To the House, I say: Show me the $20 billion in new spending reduction that the House witl support. The "compromise" departs from the judgment of every reputable economist who has testified before Congress. To a person, the nation's most eminent economists -- Republicans, Democrats and independents  tell us that the deficits are ruining the economy. They agree that a deficit reduction of between $50 billion and $60 billion will cut interest rates by at least two percentage points, increase our exports, reduce imports, stimulate housing and take some of the heat off farmers. Consider the question of America's, position ill world trade. At a time of record deficits in our trade balances, we would turn our back on the single most effective remedy for anemic exports and heavy imports: a meaningful reduction in the federal deficit. In the long term, $200 billion deficits will ruin the American economy. We cannot live beyond our means forever, making it from one year to the next by piling a new mortgage of $200 billion on our children and grandchildren. ,w / -% 1 YESTERYEAR'S PICTURES I II Backward Glances Pearl Plank 2O YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News July 29, lf Raymond B. Greene, of Balboa, Canal Zone, has been named instructor in English-Speech and Drama at Culver-stockton College. Mr. Gresv will replace Lawrence Fischer, who has resigned. The annual Lewis County 4-H Show attracted a large crowd this past weekend on the Canton School grounds. Representatives from nine states attended the second biennial meeting of the American Pencil Collectors Society held on the campus of Culver- Stockton College July 20-22. Those traveling the most miles to attend the convention were from San Jose, Calif., and Van Nuys, Calif., while the state with the most representatives was Illinois. The other states represented were Missouri, Indiana, South Dakota, Kansas, Iowa, Pennsylvania and Ohio. All national officers were re-elected for the next two years. They were Lester C. Taylor, Sterling, Kans., president; Aubrey N. Allen, Canton, vice-president; and Mrs. Paul R. Young, Hutchinson, Kans., secretary. Mr. Taylor, professor of religion and philosophy at Sterling College, proba- bly has the largest single collation of writing instruments in existence, over 53,000. Turley & Jones of Canton is this week advertising a sale in celebration of its 50th anniversary in Canton. In 1916 Mr. Turley bega the operation of a dry goods store with Miss Ella Jones as a partner under the trade name of Turley and Jones. In 1937 Mrs. Rosenthal became associated with the business. Mr. Turley died April 29, 1941. Miss Ella Jones is now inactive in the business, making her home at the Good Samaritan Home in Quincy. Mrs. Resenthal now operates the store with the aid of Mrs. Russell Burk who has been with her for eight years. Mrs. Harry Cottrell, 94, died July 27 in st. Mary t00q)i00 in quincy. Mrs. Cottrell had lived in Canton for the last 10 years. The Lewis CAmaty Journal Jnly 2O, I Basil Fountain, president of the LaBelle Rodeo Association, has announced that plans have been completed for the lh annual LaBelle Rodeo to be held at the LaBelle Rodeo arena Friday and Saturday evenings, August 6 and 7. The Diamond Horseshoe Rodeo company of Godfrey, III., is producing the rodeo and will furnishy stock for the_ events. F. B. (Fritz) Conrath, 64, died in Blessing Hospital, Quincy, July 21, where he had been a patient only a few hours. Mr. Conrath, a widely known and respected Lewis Countlan, served the county as Representative in the Missouri Legislature for two terms. He had been employed by the state revenue department for 27 years. He was a member of the Ewing Baptist Church. Caril Dee Tucker of Williamstown is pictured with her grand champion steer at the 4-H Show. The champion steer brought I1 a hundred at the sale and was purchased by four Canton businessmen, IGA, Dog 'n' Suds, Green's Dairy and J Andy Zenge, Jr. Two lovely Lewis County 4-H girls were selected at the annual 4-H Show to represent this county at the District Dress Revue at Kirksville on August 13. They are Karen Uhlmeyer and Jeanne Howard. National Grange Lecturer William Brake of Michigan and Washington, D.C., will direct the first Mid-west Grange Lecturer Conference and Family Camporee August 5-7. Missouri State Grange is host for the conference and has chosen Garnett Grange Hall in Lewis County as the site. The First Baptist Church of stown has called Rev. Loyle Van Horn as their pastor, coming from the First Baptist Church of Mundelein, m. Rev. Van Horn has pastored churches in Texas and Missouri. SO YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News August 1, 193.5 Mrs. Amanda Vice, 72, died July 27 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Herbert Wolf. Richard Tillmann is an artist in making articles from wood with a knife. He has whittled out several desk lamps that are beautiful, but his latest effort far surpassed these. He has on display in the Canton Hardware Store window a floor lamp cut from a single piece of cedar with a pocket knife. Dr. Walter Williams, 71, founder of the first school of journalism at the University of Missmu and president of the university until last July 1, died at his home in Columbia Monday, Miss Mada McCutchan, who is principal of the Girls' School in Susteln, China, arrived home Monday to spend her fwst vacation in six years. Miss Mada and hrother, Hugh, have represented the Presbyterian Church in the mission field in China the past 24 years Monticello Mrs. Lucy Hemming is trying to make the Benjamin school approved This picture, loaned by Loretta Bringer, Maywood, shows the congre- gation of the South Union Baptist Church in Maywood at about 1893. This picture was one of several on display at the church- the only one in Maywood --this weekend during the by September. Tuesday she and Miss Mary Alderton worked in classifying the library - a requirement in an approved rural school, Bertram the implement man, sold and delivered a new ten-foot power binder to Rice McCutchan early Tuesday. It was a hurry-up trans- action. YEARS AGO The Lewht County Journal July 31, 19'?.5 T. I. Johnson has purchased a controlling interest in the LaGrange Savings Bank. Mr. Johnson purchased a majority of the stock from F. S. Hagood, who has been cashier for some years. Mr. Johnson has been vice president of Monticello Trust Company since its origin and will retain that position. The Keokuk Canning Company is largely increasing its pickle capacity at Canton. There will be 7 new 14 foot tanks of over 1400 bushel capacity. The hotel at LaBelle, one of the oldest, burned down by a fire of unknown origin Monday morning. It was owned by J. R. Bertram of Rutledge. Leslie Hicks was killed Sunday near Edina when the car he was driving ran into a culvert as Mr. Hicks looked back to view another accident. stute Co. of St. Louis, who owns the pickle factory at this place, has Johnie Lemen employed as manager. They have the past week received their first pickles of the season and are paying $1.20 per bushel for small and 30c per bushel for the large ones. Durham N. J. Wagner of Benjamin hauled J. L. McCann's household goods to K/rksville Thursday. Lewistown Robert Boulware of Canton pur- chased at a trustee sale the  acre Vandivef farm located in the limits of Canton for $17,600. Cora Florence Fee Gray, 55, of Gray, Okla., departed this life July 18. The remains were brought to the old home place now owned by her brother, C. E. Fee, of Wil]iamstown where funeral services were conducted by J. V. Carlisle, after which they were laid to rest in the Carlin Cemetery. 70 YEARS AGO The Lewis Couuty Jourual July N, 115 As auistant high school teacher, the board has selected Prof. O. B. Eddins of Knox County. The remains of Mrs. Sidney Faulkner who died at her home in Hannibal Monday, were brought to Monticello and interred in the cemetery at this place Wednesday. Mrs. Faulkner was a sister of Charles E. Taylor of this place. celebration of the 125th year of that church. The Star-of-David stained glass windows pictured here are still present today. Much of the rest of the architecture is still the same, but the bell tower has been shortened. Monticello now has a well organized baseball team. Erie Knight, mger; David L. Breding catcher; M. Spurgeon, pitcher; Alfred WrighL Ist base; Jesse Sebork, captain, 2nd base; Pearl Anderson, 3rd base; Ernest Mitchell, short stop; Joe Story, left field; Prank Glaves, center field; and Charley Sehork, right field. At an estimated cost of $1,500 per mile a rocked road is to be constructed between Williamstown and Canton, a distance of 21 miles. Six miles have already been rocked from Canton. These two towns and the people along the highway gave upwards of $3,000 b build a dirt road between the two places and they have a good road. The day is not far distant when they will have the rock road. lOO YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal July 31, 1885 When in Canton the other day we were struck with the imposing appearance of J. C. Comle's large new warehouse, situated on the corner of Lewis and Ist Streets. We had  thought the old warehouse large and commodious enough for all purpose. but were informed that the increasing trade had given demand for more room and greater facilities for storage. The new warehouse is S6xt feet, most substantially erected with iron roof and ends, and has a capacity for the storage of 750 tons of hay. Prof. Anderson, principal of Western Academy, LaBelle, has secured the services of Prof. A. W. Lyon, an alumnus of the Missouri University and a teacher of ripe experience. Mrs. Annie Ringer has charge of the music department. Miss Bessie Nelson has charge of the school of art and is fully competent to give lessons in oli painting, crayon work, water colers, hammered brass, etc. Prof. Anderson, by his earnest, thorough work, has established an enviable reputation for * Western Academy and the people realize that this school is inferior to none for economy, moral restrat, and the success of its students., Died- at her home near Tolone on July 15, Miss Mary Kirschba, daughter of William and Katie Kirschbaum. /