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Canton, Missouri
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July 25, 1985     Press-News Journal
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SEN IOR SCEN E Press-News Journal, Canton, Me., Thursday, July 25, 1985,! LEWIS CO. Volunteer guardianship program NURSING gi HOME presented at Area A ng Agency A large crowd was present at the by Joseph 0'Hara, director of the Legislature and programs-projects The residents have been enjoying the lovely summer weather and planning a picnic at the park in the near future. Birthdays to be celebrated in August are Iloris Hamill, 1st; Ula Walter, 4th; Helen Pruett, 20; Lou Ella Smith, 22; Bessie Fish, 26; Nellie Hunolt, 27th; Mort Denniston, 29th; Buzz Harris, g6th; and Freida Hustead, 31st. The scheduled activities are as follows: coffee break, sing-a-long and rhythm band with Elsie Brinkley, and bingo on Monday. Tuesday, hymn sing with the Canton Baptist Church, Bible quiz with Willard Jackson, pitch was played in the sun room. Anyone wishing to play cards and needing a partner or place to meet, is invited to come to the nursing home. Table ball continues on Wednesdays as well as Bible stories with Rev. Chuck Long from the Canton Christian Church. Wednesday afternoon a group met in the activity room for quiz time. Kick ball, Sunday School with Rev. Wilbur Sharpe, and our friends from Quincy, the Lampe Hi Rise Kitchen Band entertained on Thursday. On Friday after coffee break, the residents gathered in the activity room to visit and plan more outings. After lunch the following people went to the Lewis County Fair: Marion Goeh[, Willard Jackson, Durward Speer; Mildred Willows, Flossie Stephenson, Bea Spurgeon, Mamie Davis, Ruby Peterson and Nellie Dye. They attended the entertainment provided by the Lampe Hi Rise Band and viewed the exhibits in the open show and 4-H buildings. Time passed so quickly that supper had to be eaten at the fair (but to no one's disappoint- ment). This allowed the residents to watch the horses working out in preparation for the show later that evening. Probably one of the most enjoyable parts of the day was seeing and visiting with old friends and new. All express their appreciation to the fair board for a wonderful day. The residents are also very appreciative to the classes of 1940, 41, and 42 of Canton High School for the beautiful flower arrangements. Church services for Sunday, July 28 are with George Braden of LaGrange Methodist Church. HAPPENINGS The Lewis County Fair is in progress this week, and we are looking forward to attending some of the activities. Several of our residents entered their ceramics and all are excited about getting a' ribbon. The following residents entered items: Laveta Queen, Doc Holliday, Lowell Autrey, Channel Townsley, Louise Shahan, Albert Wyatt, Martha White, Brian Willis, Ellen Montague, and Judy East. We have been busy the past week attending ceramic classes on Monday. Tuesday we went to the Lewis County Fair to enter our ceramics, and in the afternoon watched a movie on the art of basket weaving. Wednesday we went on the Mark Twain River Boat cruise and had a ' delicious dinner. The following resi- dents made the trip: Lowell Autrey, Leo Borden, Judy East, Doc Holliday, Ellen Montague, Laveta Queen, Louise Shahan, Myrtle Thompson, Channel Townsley, Brian Willis, Martha White and Albert Wyatt. We had a guest on the trip, Alma Merrell. Alma has been a resident in the Manor in the past, and ever so often Alma likes to come with us on some of our events. Everyone was glad to see her again. Linda House and Lyla Merrell assisted with the trip. Thursday was spent with Rev. Wilbur Sharpe in Bible Study class. Wednesday evening Doc Holliday, Virginia McBride, L6 o Borden, Myrtle Thompson, Chris Schlenz, Brian Willis, Channel Townsley, Judy East, Lowell Autrey, and Ola Selby attended a dance by the Mark Twain Mental Health Association. Anna Marie Tonnies and Cherie Hustead assisted with the trip. Benton Banks and Francis Sharpe have been admitted to Blessing Hospital this week. MH volunteers end May drive The following volunteers have successfully conducted Bellringer drives in their respective communities which will benefit the Mental Health in Missouri. Bellringer workers collected house-to-house dur- ihg the Ma] drive. They are: LaVeta Stith, Wil|jamstown, $32.50; Mrs. Ronald Johlason, Durham, $21.05; and Darlene Stiee, Monticello, $25. Proceeds, benefit the non-profit, non-govermental agency whose mem- bers are cated to fighting mental illness while working on behalf of the mentally ill and their families. monthly meeting of the Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging held in Paris at the Community Federal Savings & Loan July 15. Staff reports were given by Dianna Cheatum, fiscal director, and Vicki Locke, administrative assistant. Mary Lou Brennan of Mark Twain Legal Services summarized the volunteer guardianship program they have initiated. Training sessions for this new program will be held the last of August throughout the NEMO AAA area. Macon County Coordinator Carole Akery discussed the nutrition program and In-Home Services program currently operating in Macon County. Vic Losson of the Governor's Advisory Council summarized the goals presented at their June meeting Department of Social Services. These goals included focusing on prevention programs for the senior Missourian and the development of funding for new projects-programs. Losson also shared information from Lloyd Conley. director of the Division of Aging. Conley had spoken on state health initiatives and the desire to develop a supportive coalition between the Missouri Division of Aging and the Area Agencies on Aging. Martha Wadlin, executive director of NEMO AAA, explained the current status of the 1986 Area Plan and the Request for Proposal for 1986 Social Services Block Grant-General Revenue Funds. Other business at the meeting included the discussion of the Pike County Council on Aging, the progress of bills generated by the Silver Haired associated with the state and federa health promotion initiatives. It was announced that the offices of the Missouri Division of Aging have been moved to 505 Missouri Blvd., Jefferson City. Board members pointed out that Aug. 14 will be the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Social Security Act. Senior citizens should pause to reflect on the man)' aspects of Social Security which affect their lives. Subcontractor board training will be held on Aug. 22 in Moberly. The next meeting of the NEMO AAA, which is open to the public, will be Aug. 19 in Memphis. The NEMO AAA serves the counties of Adair, Clark, Knox, Lewis. Lincoln, Macon, Marion, Monroe, Montgomery. Pike, Rails, Randolph. Schuyler, Scotland. Shelby and Warren. Objectives assessed, goals set As the Lewis County Council on Aging Nutrition Program closes fiscal year 1985 (July 1, 1984 - June 30, 1985) and begins fiscal year 1986, we try to assess what objectives have been met this past year and with that information set our goals for the coming year. The total number of meals served in Lewis County Nutrition centers in fiscal year '85 amounted to 74,526. This averaged 244 meals per day. Services are available 6 days per week (Monday - Saturday) and also a 7th day delivery is possible for those persons most in need, Those who participated contributed $81,928.16 toward the cost of food, labor and delivery of the meals. Each meal costs $2.50 to provide. Federal reimbursements for fiscal year '85 was 75c per meal for eligible participants and this amounted to $52,702. USDA cash and commodities and general income made up the balance of the meal expenses. In fiscal year '86 federal reimburse- ment through Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging will be decreased to 65c per meal for eligible participants. As these funding sources decrease participant contributions, fund raising and volunteers will become increasing- ly important in the months ahead. With the continued support of area residents our goal of 250 meals a day will be achieved. Support your senior center. Menu for week of July 29: Monday - pepper steak-rice and applesauce cake: Tuesday BBQ ribs and canteioupe; Wednesday - chicken Maryland and hot rolls: Thursday - beef patty and gingerbread; Friday - roast beef and bread pudding; Saturday - pork steak and ice cream. STONE HAVEN Farmer's NEWS Monday Winnie Goings spent the day in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Donnie Goings. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stice were by to visit with Lula Bauerrichter. Robert Sykes enjoyed attending the Lewis County Faur this week. Willa Daggs enjoyed attending the fair Sunday afternoon with Thelma Adams.  Rsidants xeally enjoyed a .zucini cake which Erma Phfant had brought them. Visitors this week were Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Willis Bulher, Mr. and Mrs. Marion Crabill, Bobby Garnett, Mrs. Carl Woodard, Marjorie Ellison, Mrs. Brock Phillips, Mary Jarman, Rev. Graves, Kenny Van Meter, Louis Jackson, Doris Porter and daughter Janet, Mr. and Mrs. Otho Eistertz, Mr. and Mrs. Freddy Cunningham and family, Bonnie Rae Robinson and daughter, Erma Phfant and Dorothy Cramer, Etta Mae Hutcherson, Elizabeth Maxwell, Arlene Ragan and Martha Lowe. Mildred Gaus took her sister, Roxie for a drive Sunday and Burdette Kurk took Lula Bauerriehter for an outing. Mrs. H. C. O'Dear was in to visit Willa Daggs and Myrtle Vance. Journal Keith Wilkey We shall overcome I don't recall exactly when I first heard of the iceo! land  Our area crossing the $1,000 per acre barrier. But it crossed the $2,000 mark in the late 19605. Quickly came $3,000...then $4,000 for a single acre of dirt. Each time the price doubled there were more serious questions in the minds of older farmers. As the price of land rose so did the anxieties of the veterans of the Great Depression of a half century ago. But assurances were made by well meaning observers that the old days would never come again. "Things are just different now," they assured. More and more agriculture became beguiled by the serpent who said America was running out of prime farm land...and fast! The Malthusian Theory was dusted off and greased up for another run. tin short, Englishman Thomas Robert Malthus, in 1798 wrote his, -- "Essay On The Principles of Popula- tion." Malthus theorized that as world population increases geometrically and food production increases only ari- thmetically, we will some day run out of food. While it may happen, it didn't in the 1970s.) People were reminded that today in England it is all but impossible to buy -- good land. "You just have to inherit, it." they said. How soon would it happen in America? Other fuels were powering the land price rocket. Trade barriers were being broken down in the Communist Bloc. Already we were tradirig with the Soviet Union and in 1973 President Richard Nixon made a history-making trip to China opening up what appeared to be a Pandora's box for agricultural trade. This was the brave new world of the 1970s. While these happenings were taking place in international affairs, domestic inflation boomed up to 22 and '23 percent. Thus the group mind feeling in agriculture was, "the goose. hangs high." Was it any wonder that sober, dependable, conservative farmers and farm leaders felt that the day of the four-figure land price was here to stay? In retrospect, can we really blame agricultural lenders, with coffers filled with money ready to be loaned at historic interest rates? All were human...none had a pipeline to : !ii i LADIES SHOW CRAFTS -- Ladies of the Canton Senior crafts at the Lewis County Fair last week. Seated from left Mary Hemming, Leona Cox, Irene Sawdy, Pearl Schork, Harris. In back are Melba Jeffers. Lola Ludwig, Martha (worker), Aita Eistertz, Tressie Green and Adele Merrell. ed are Mildred Green, Marie Mason. Lucille Quinn, LaBonte, Verna Stfffey and Erma Jackson. Heaven. We have no room for the "I-told-you-so" doomsayers. Farm foreclosures are heart-wrench- ing at best. The only comparison is the loss of a spouse. They are accompa- nied. by discouragement, disappoint- ment, frustration...and yes, tears. Sometimes bitter tears. Agriculture made i 19705. It was a recovery will generation. But will survive, some down but they are walked through the Stretch Your Dollars with PNJ Classifieds JANNEY BUILDERS- Now exclusive area .... [ dealer for the I Got the for College JANNEY sUPPLY Palmyra, " We don't like to call them education loans, we look at them as investments in the future. Education is one of the most valuable assets we can have, and we're proud tO be able to help anyone with a thirst for knowledge go further in life. But to do so is costly, and that's where we can help. When you're ready for college, speak to us. i PALMYRA_SAVING ) AND BUILDING ASSOCIATION Pidmyra -- Cann -- Kahoka AT BUILDERS NOWI MOORE'S" OIL 8ASE MOORWHITE' HOUSE PAINT PRIMER MOORGARD" LATEX High Gloss, Ott ease HOUSE PAINT Protective Finish. With Excellent Hiding, MOORfiL0" LATEX Leveling & Sealing. Low Lustre Finish, HOUSE & TRIM PAINT White White Lasting Durability. Long Lasting Colors REG.... SiS" White In A Soft Gloss Finish. SPECIAL ,,o. ,,., $1T s ,,o. ,,.,o -,$'69 ,,o. ,,.,, SPECIAL $ 1 75o Custom Colors SPECIAL . seectAt Slightly Higher JANNEY BUILDERS SUPPLY SEN IOR SCEN E Press-News Journal, Canton, Me., Thursday, July 25, 1985,! LEWIS CO. Volunteer guardianship program NURSING gi HOME presented at Area A ng Agency A large crowd was present at the by Joseph 0'Hara, director of the Legislature and programs-projects The residents have been enjoying the lovely summer weather and planning a picnic at the park in the near future. Birthdays to be celebrated in August are Iloris Hamill, 1st; Ula Walter, 4th; Helen Pruett, 20; Lou Ella Smith, 22; Bessie Fish, 26; Nellie Hunolt, 27th; Mort Denniston, 29th; Buzz Harris, g6th; and Freida Hustead, 31st. The scheduled activities are as follows: coffee break, sing-a-long and rhythm band with Elsie Brinkley, and bingo on Monday. Tuesday, hymn sing with the Canton Baptist Church, Bible quiz with Willard Jackson, pitch was played in the sun room. Anyone wishing to play cards and needing a partner or place to meet, is invited to come to the nursing home. Table ball continues on Wednesdays as well as Bible stories with Rev. Chuck Long from the Canton Christian Church. Wednesday afternoon a group met in the activity room for quiz time. Kick ball, Sunday School with Rev. Wilbur Sharpe, and our friends from Quincy, the Lampe Hi Rise Kitchen Band entertained on Thursday. On Friday after coffee break, the residents gathered in the activity room to visit and plan more outings. After lunch the following people went to the Lewis County Fair: Marion Goeh[, Willard Jackson, Durward Speer; Mildred Willows, Flossie Stephenson, Bea Spurgeon, Mamie Davis, Ruby Peterson and Nellie Dye. They attended the entertainment provided by the Lampe Hi Rise Band and viewed the exhibits in the open show and 4-H buildings. Time passed so quickly that supper had to be eaten at the fair (but to no one's disappoint- ment). This allowed the residents to watch the horses working out in preparation for the show later that evening. Probably one of the most enjoyable parts of the day was seeing and visiting with old friends and new. All express their appreciation to the fair board for a wonderful day. The residents are also very appreciative to the classes of 1940, 41, and 42 of Canton High School for the beautiful flower arrangements. Church services for Sunday, July 28 are with George Braden of LaGrange Methodist Church. HAPPENINGS The Lewis County Fair is in progress this week, and we are looking forward to attending some of the activities. Several of our residents entered their ceramics and all are excited about getting a' ribbon. The following residents entered items: Laveta Queen, Doc Holliday, Lowell Autrey, Channel Townsley, Louise Shahan, Albert Wyatt, Martha White, Brian Willis, Ellen Montague, and Judy East. We have been busy the past week attending ceramic classes on Monday. Tuesday we went to the Lewis County Fair to enter our ceramics, and in the afternoon watched a movie on the art of basket weaving. Wednesday we went on the Mark Twain River Boat cruise and had a ' delicious dinner. The following resi- dents made the trip: Lowell Autrey, Leo Borden, Judy East, Doc Holliday, Ellen Montague, Laveta Queen, Louise Shahan, Myrtle Thompson, Channel Townsley, Brian Willis, Martha White and Albert Wyatt. We had a guest on the trip, Alma Merrell. Alma has been a resident in the Manor in the past, and ever so often Alma likes to come with us on some of our events. Everyone was glad to see her again. Linda House and Lyla Merrell assisted with the trip. Thursday was spent with Rev. Wilbur Sharpe in Bible Study class. Wednesday evening Doc Holliday, Virginia McBride, L6 o Borden, Myrtle Thompson, Chris Schlenz, Brian Willis, Channel Townsley, Judy East, Lowell Autrey, and Ola Selby attended a dance by the Mark Twain Mental Health Association. Anna Marie Tonnies and Cherie Hustead assisted with the trip. Benton Banks and Francis Sharpe have been admitted to Blessing Hospital this week. MH volunteers end May drive The following volunteers have successfully conducted Bellringer drives in their respective communities which will benefit the Mental Health in Missouri. Bellringer workers collected house-to-house dur- ihg the Ma] drive. They are: LaVeta Stith, Wil|jamstown, $32.50; Mrs. Ronald Johlason, Durham, $21.05; and Darlene Stiee, Monticello, $25. Proceeds, benefit the non-profit, non-govermental agency whose mem- bers are cated to fighting mental illness while working on behalf of the mentally ill and their families. monthly meeting of the Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging held in Paris at the Community Federal Savings & Loan July 15. Staff reports were given by Dianna Cheatum, fiscal director, and Vicki Locke, administrative assistant. Mary Lou Brennan of Mark Twain Legal Services summarized the volunteer guardianship program they have initiated. Training sessions for this new program will be held the last of August throughout the NEMO AAA area. Macon County Coordinator Carole Akery discussed the nutrition program and In-Home Services program currently operating in Macon County. Vic Losson of the Governor's Advisory Council summarized the goals presented at their June meeting Department of Social Services. These goals included focusing on prevention programs for the senior Missourian and the development of funding for new projects-programs. Losson also shared information from Lloyd Conley. director of the Division of Aging. Conley had spoken on state health initiatives and the desire to develop a supportive coalition between the Missouri Division of Aging and the Area Agencies on Aging. Martha Wadlin, executive director of NEMO AAA, explained the current status of the 1986 Area Plan and the Request for Proposal for 1986 Social Services Block Grant-General Revenue Funds. Other business at the meeting included the discussion of the Pike County Council on Aging, the progress of bills generated by the Silver Haired associated with the state and federa health promotion initiatives. It was announced that the offices of the Missouri Division of Aging have been moved to 505 Missouri Blvd., Jefferson City. Board members pointed out that Aug. 14 will be the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Social Security Act. Senior citizens should pause to reflect on the man)' aspects of Social Security which affect their lives. Subcontractor board training will be held on Aug. 22 in Moberly. The next meeting of the NEMO AAA, which is open to the public, will be Aug. 19 in Memphis. The NEMO AAA serves the counties of Adair, Clark, Knox, Lewis. Lincoln, Macon, Marion, Monroe, Montgomery. Pike, Rails, Randolph. Schuyler, Scotland. Shelby and Warren. Objectives assessed, goals set As the Lewis County Council on Aging Nutrition Program closes fiscal year 1985 (July 1, 1984 - June 30, 1985) and begins fiscal year 1986, we try to assess what objectives have been met this past year and with that information set our goals for the coming year. The total number of meals served in Lewis County Nutrition centers in fiscal year '85 amounted to 74,526. This averaged 244 meals per day. Services are available 6 days per week (Monday - Saturday) and also a 7th day delivery is possible for those persons most in need, Those who participated contributed $81,928.16 toward the cost of food, labor and delivery of the meals. Each meal costs $2.50 to provide. Federal reimbursements for fiscal year '85 was 75c per meal for eligible participants and this amounted to $52,702. USDA cash and commodities and general income made up the balance of the meal expenses. In fiscal year '86 federal reimburse- ment through Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging will be decreased to 65c per meal for eligible participants. As these funding sources decrease participant contributions, fund raising and volunteers will become increasing- ly important in the months ahead. With the continued support of area residents our goal of 250 meals a day will be achieved. Support your senior center. Menu for week of July 29: Monday - pepper steak-rice and applesauce cake: Tuesday BBQ ribs and canteioupe; Wednesday - chicken Maryland and hot rolls: Thursday - beef patty and gingerbread; Friday - roast beef and bread pudding; Saturday - pork steak and ice cream. STONE HAVEN Farmer's NEWS Monday Winnie Goings spent the day in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Donnie Goings. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stice were by to visit with Lula Bauerrichter. Robert Sykes enjoyed attending the Lewis County Faur this week. Willa Daggs enjoyed attending the fair Sunday afternoon with Thelma Adams.  Rsidants xeally enjoyed a .zucini cake which Erma Phfant had brought them. Visitors this week were Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Willis Bulher, Mr. and Mrs. Marion Crabill, Bobby Garnett, Mrs. Carl Woodard, Marjorie Ellison, Mrs. Brock Phillips, Mary Jarman, Rev. Graves, Kenny Van Meter, Louis Jackson, Doris Porter and daughter Janet, Mr. and Mrs. Otho Eistertz, Mr. and Mrs. Freddy Cunningham and family, Bonnie Rae Robinson and daughter, Erma Phfant and Dorothy Cramer, Etta Mae Hutcherson, Elizabeth Maxwell, Arlene Ragan and Martha Lowe. Mildred Gaus took her sister, Roxie for a drive Sunday and Burdette Kurk took Lula Bauerriehter for an outing. Mrs. H. C. O'Dear was in to visit Willa Daggs and Myrtle Vance. Journal Keith Wilkey We shall overcome I don't recall exactly when I first heard of the iceo! land  Our area crossing the $1,000 per acre barrier. But it crossed the $2,000 mark in the late 19605. Quickly came $3,000...then $4,000 for a single acre of dirt. Each time the price doubled there were more serious questions in the minds of older farmers. As the price of land rose so did the anxieties of the veterans of the Great Depression of a half century ago. But assurances were made by well meaning observers that the old days would never come again. "Things are just different now," they assured. More and more agriculture became beguiled by the serpent who said America was running out of prime farm land...and fast! The Malthusian Theory was dusted off and greased up for another run. tin short, Englishman Thomas Robert Malthus, in 1798 wrote his, -- "Essay On The Principles of Popula- tion." Malthus theorized that as world population increases geometrically and food production increases only ari- thmetically, we will some day run out of food. While it may happen, it didn't in the 1970s.) People were reminded that today in England it is all but impossible to buy -- good land. "You just have to inherit, it." they said. How soon would it happen in America? Other fuels were powering the land price rocket. Trade barriers were being broken down in the Communist Bloc. Already we were tradirig with the Soviet Union and in 1973 President Richard Nixon made a history-making trip to China opening up what appeared to be a Pandora's box for agricultural trade. This was the brave new world of the 1970s. While these happenings were taking place in international affairs, domestic inflation boomed up to 22 and '23 percent. Thus the group mind feeling in agriculture was, "the goose. hangs high." Was it any wonder that sober, dependable, conservative farmers and farm leaders felt that the day of the four-figure land price was here to stay? In retrospect, can we really blame agricultural lenders, with coffers filled with money ready to be loaned at historic interest rates? All were human...none had a pipeline to : !ii i LADIES SHOW CRAFTS -- Ladies of the Canton Senior crafts at the Lewis County Fair last week. Seated from left Mary Hemming, Leona Cox, Irene Sawdy, Pearl Schork, Harris. In back are Melba Jeffers. Lola Ludwig, Martha (worker), Aita Eistertz, Tressie Green and Adele Merrell. ed are Mildred Green, Marie Mason. Lucille Quinn, LaBonte, Verna Stfffey and Erma Jackson. Heaven. We have no room for the "I-told-you-so" doomsayers. Farm foreclosures are heart-wrench- ing at best. The only comparison is the loss of a spouse. They are accompa- nied. by discouragement, disappoint- ment, frustration...and yes, tears. Sometimes bitter tears. Agriculture made i 19705. It was a recovery will generation. But will survive, some down but they are walked through the Stretch Your Dollars with PNJ Classifieds JANNEY BUILDERS- Now exclusive area .... [ dealer for the I Got the for College JANNEY sUPPLY Palmyra, " We don't like to call them education loans, we look at them as investments in the future. Education is one of the most valuable assets we can have, and we're proud tO be able to help anyone with a thirst for knowledge go further in life. But to do so is costly, and that's where we can help. When you're ready for college, speak to us. i PALMYRA_SAVING ) AND BUILDING ASSOCIATION Pidmyra -- Cann -- Kahoka AT BUILDERS NOWI MOORE'S" OIL 8ASE MOORWHITE' HOUSE PAINT PRIMER MOORGARD" LATEX High Gloss, Ott ease HOUSE PAINT Protective Finish. With Excellent Hiding, MOORfiL0" LATEX Leveling & Sealing. Low Lustre Finish, HOUSE & TRIM PAINT White White Lasting Durability. Long Lasting Colors REG.... SiS" White In A Soft Gloss Finish. SPECIAL ,,o. ,,., $1T s ,,o. ,,.,o -,$'69 ,,o. ,,.,, SPECIAL $ 1 75o Custom Colors SPECIAL . seectAt Slightly Higher JANNEY BUILDERS SUPPLY