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Canton, Missouri
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July 25, 1985     Press-News Journal
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Z I ,EN ERAL N EWS Animals can be Hall gets paint job from the Mark Twain Regional Planning Commission, the was getting a new coat of paint -- from chimneys to the paint and the Regional Planning Commission b Club met in July 16 with Bell and Were visitors. with the Bradshaw God', for the Was answered. a thank you note chair pads the | home. Were discussed.. to attend each.. made for the held at the 27 at 6 p.m. Brandt gave the early days County for the prizes going Brandt and Aug. 20 at with Mae WMS met 16, in the with five with the WMS end the WMS prayer was followed give $I0 to the boys and girls The program, was given by prayer by honor of ice cream 'ea of Retired met at the July 15 at president, repeating Sixteen call. had attended reports and Beulah meeting at gave a talk of having little children introduce organized learning situations to help them to learn to read, etc. Maxine Walker attended the state clue to weather changes When a storm is brewing, cats 'r groom themselves and cows overeat. Animal diseases increase, flies bite and hogs sometimes make "storm shelter" -nests of sticks and cobs. During periods of a fuji moon, many farmers won't castrate their animals (and some human doctors won't perform surgery, either). "It seems animals-including hu- mans--just naturally respond to changes in the weather," said Dr. Bonnard Moseley, University of Mlssonri-Columbia veterinar/an. Moseley has made a hobby of studying animals' reactions to the weather and trying to separate facts from folklore. "It's amazing how observant people were about the weather centuries ago," said Moseley, who grew up in rural South Central Missouri before modern mass communications reached the Ozark Hills. He and his farmer neighbors learned to rely on animal signs for clues to future weather. What they observed was often based on changes in barometric pressure which drops before a storm. Swallows and other birds have sensitive ears that are affected by slight pressure changes. They fly low before a storm to compeusafe for the pressure drop. As for tidy cats, static electricity chargingthe air before a summer storm makes them feel dirty. It separates their coat hairs, and cats hurry to smooth them again. Feedlot operators report that cattle eat more before severe weather, sometimes to the point of overeating. "Most metabolic diseases of animals --like milk fever and grass tetany-- occur before severe changes in weather," Moseley said. "As a veterinarian, I've noticed that most calving activity occurs before storms or major changes in weather and almost none occurs when storms are at their peak." He said humans are likewise affected by the weather. "The World Health Organization in a survey of over a million people said the death rate increases 15 percent ahead of a major change in the weather," Moseley said. "When the barometer is low, people -- tend tobe depressml and don't perform as well as they should. Studies show their reflexes are 6 percent slower. "In the 1700s, the Bank of England conference at Bunker Hi]] Resort near sent its employees home during Mt. Grove, Mo., for a five day meeting pressure drops because they made which she enjoyed. The resort is-more mistakes then.', Both farm animals and people also sponsored and financed by the Mo.i State Association and is available for Mo. State meetings and the enjoyment of teachers throughout the year. The guest speaker was Oneta Mye, high school guidance counselor at Highland. She told of the many duties she performs to help students with their individual problems and ways to solve them. She also stressed the importance of planning with each student the subjects he wants to take as soon as he is in juinor high school for the work or career he is planning to follow when he graduates. After the meeting Mrs. Luker and respond to good weather. "Spring fever, for example is a real phenomenon," Moseley said. "You'll see horses running and waving their tails high in the air, showing off how good they feel." As for the full moon phenomenon, Moseley said there is some "good evidence" of its effects. "I know many farmers who won't castrate their animals during the full moon phase, and I heard one surgeon Mrs. Gould served refreshments. The time and place of the next Mailbox meeting in September will be announced later. Joe Quinn at convention of independent agents Joe Quinn of Canton Insurance attended the 86th Annual Convention of the Independent Insurance Agents of Missouri July 18-2o at the Lake of the Ozarks. The convention featured educational sessions on management, new ideas for streamlining agency operations and servicing insureds, and an overview of changes in commercial lines insurance that will be introduced in 1986." Featured at the convention was an appearance by Tom Heinsohn, former Boston Celtics all-star forward and coach, who is now a basketball analyst for CBS Sports. Over 1,000 persons attended the tlp-ee-day event. " The Independent Insurance Agents of Missouri is an association whose membership consists of nearly 650 of the state's independent insurance agencies, and over 1,500 license insurance agents and brokers. Its members sell all lines of insurance: property, casualty, life, and health. They are identified by the sign of the big 'T'. Letters From Our Readers III To The Press-News Journal: Many people in the Lewis County region of northeast Missouri feel as if the economic viability of the area is slowly dwindling, wilting on the vine as we watch. I must confes that I too, have observed this and at several times attempted to speak out upon the subject. For far too long the citizens of Lewis County have been contented making a living doing one of five things: 1. Being or working with a farmer. 2. Operating in the service sector (small town business). 3. Working for Culver.Stockton. 4. Working in Quincy-using Lewis County as a suburb envirmment. 5. Welfare. This is not to be taken wrong! There is absolutely nothing wrong with farming or being a small town businessman. There is nothing wrong with working for the college or 00iserking in Quincy. However, as recent istory has shown, none of these are enough to secure Lewis County's economic viability. Anybody who lost a job in Quincy due to the closing of Electric Wheel or, even farther back in time, Motorola, can tell you that replacing that job can be next to impossible. It's near impossible to find work in Quincy today and worse yet right here at home! We can no longer be content to look at Lewis County as simply a suburb for the Quincy work force. Even farming has shown severe econom_ic strains and along with that the entire service sector for farming. Many may be confused with what I mean by service sector. Simply put it is the small rural communities in which you will find grbceries, spare Press.News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, July 25, 1985, Page " Rte C change Work Is progressing on Route C improvement, which includes ellati d mini sharp curves. This area near the Route C-Route CC Junction shows the new road wlth blacktop at right and the current road at left. in Tallahassee, Fla., who won't perform surgery during this time," he said. "The Florida doctor had a nurse who kept careful records which showed hemorrhages were increased substan- tially during '.hose times. So the doctor said he would not perform surgery then and would instead reserve the time for romance!" While Dr Moseley said some of these associations between environ- mental phenomena and animal be- havior are reliable, he's skeptical about a few. One is the comm0oly held belief that a preponderance of black, wooly caterpillars is a sure  that a severe winter is coming. "I've talked with entomologists about this, and they say that whether caterpillars are black or wooly depends on the species," Mose|ey said "This is one piece of folklore that doesn't work for me." at does work--most of the time-is what Moseley calls the "law of averages." Take this year, for examlge. "I predicted an early spring simply because we had two late ones in 1963-84," Meseley said. Using that philosophy, he's expecting. another dry summer. "It seems that one extreme always follows another," be.aid. " "We had rains 16 of So days in June in mid-Missouri. I'm f-ful of another dry July and August. "But this year farmers had a chance to plant earlier. They're in better shape, because they have more subsoil moisture. "I predict a fairly good summer and pretty good crop yields this year." parts, hair cuts, physician care, banking, clothing and on and on. Ask most any farmer and they will probably tell you just how badly battered they are after five bad years of high interest, falling equity, and over-all weak crop prices. Several farmers that 1 know personally have been forced to get outside jobs just to make the ends meet. As for the service sector any business man that keeps long term records can tell you just how bad the economic envirommmt is. Although this letter has sounded bleak there is some hope on the horizon. A number sol concerned citizens . countywide have joined together to create the Lewis County Developmental Corp., a n0n-profit corporation with the specific goal of mproving the economic environment of Lewis County. Presently the Corp. is working towards raising funds which will eventually lead to a regional airport in the area. With a regional airport the region will have one of the best mixes of transportation avaikble anYWhere. Along with that eemm an easier job of selling our region to interested businem wanting to find new places for production. Some might wonder as to the value of an airport but a little thought will show many valued aspects: 1. Emergency evaucatioa of injured. 2. Emergency reliefin time of disaster. 3. Crop servicing from the air. 4. Jobs in construction, maintemmce and expansion. 5. Jobs in aircraft related -vices. 6. Shipping of goods and services in and out of the area. 7. Human transportati of travel- lers, businessmen, , etc. 8. Jobs in industries wh/ch may use airport for shipping. 9. Completion of regl's . tion system. I0. Sends a signal to prospective businesses of our progressive nature. We can no longer depend upon Quincy, Keokuk, or Hannibal for our economic well being. We can no longer depend utn farmi aloe. We can no MANLEY BEASLEY MARTHE BEASLEY 1 Midwest Bsb eConference July 29-31 at Hannibal Church leaders from throughout the midwest are expected to take part in a three-day program of preaching 9nd music July 29-31 when Hannihal-La- Grange College, Hannibal, holds its second annual Midwest Bible Confer- once. Manley Beasley, an evangelist from Euless, Tex., will be the keynote speaker. Preaching and music evange- lists from the region will be featured on the program. The conference sessions will be held in McKenzie Auditorium on the H-LG campus. Dr. Larry Lewis is president of Hannibal-LaGrange College. The conference will begin Monday at 1 p.m. and will continue with morning, afternoon and evening sessions longer depend upon the college alone. Instead we must strive to achieve a complex and complementary blend of industry and businesses which together will greatly improve our economic security so that if one sector of the economy is hurting it, doesn't destroy the entire economy. Otherwise the largest single industry in Lewis County may well turn out to be Welfare! If you are interested in progress and improving the economic environment of our region you can help by supporting the Lewis County Develop. ment Corp., Box. 321, Canton, Mo. 63435, by joining or by donations. All can benefit from your action especially the upcoming generations. Dr. G. L. Collier, Canton CANTON through noon Wednesday. Conference participants may arrange for lodging in the college dormitories for $I0 per person per night, and $5 for each additional family member. Meal . tickets may be purchased for $17.50. Advanced registration is encouraged and may be made by writing: Dale Smith, Midwest Bible Conferenc(T Coordinator, Hannibal-LaGrange Col- lege, Hannibal, Mo. 63401, or calling (314) 221-3675, ext. 233. Attends dance convention in Chicago During the week of July 15-21, 21 members of the Cheryl Kaiser School of Dance attended the, Chicago National Association of Dance Masters Convention and Ballet Forum. Sarah Kenney, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Kenney of Canton, a senior student of Cheryl Kaiser, participated in the ballet forum and training school and performed in the student review on July 21, and the ballet gala July 18. Throughout the week dance classes consisting of tap, jazz, ballet, modern and musical comedy were taken under the direction of a number of renowned and credentialed dancers and dance educators. Two favorite faculty persons were Fred Kelly, brother of famous dancer Gone Kelly, and Bob Fitch who has appeared in 21 Broadway shows, including ',Annie" in the role of "Rooster." COMMUNITY ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 3r00l ANNUAL HOG ROAST Saturday, July 27 CANTON BALL PARK Youth Ball Games begin at 4gO0 p.m. Merving to begin at 4:30 TICItETM s2.O0 Older Women's Game at 8:00 P.m. Older Men's Game st 8:30 p.m. (mJoY mvw HmTAG00 OAYS AT mt BALL PAIX) Z I ,EN ERAL N EWS Animals can be Hall gets paint job from the Mark Twain Regional Planning Commission, the was getting a new coat of paint -- from chimneys to the paint and the Regional Planning Commission b Club met in July 16 with Bell and Were visitors. with the Bradshaw God', for the Was answered. a thank you note chair pads the | home. Were discussed.. to attend each.. made for the held at the 27 at 6 p.m. Brandt gave the early days County for the prizes going Brandt and Aug. 20 at with Mae WMS met 16, in the with five with the WMS end the WMS prayer was followed give $I0 to the boys and girls The program, was given by prayer by honor of ice cream 'ea of Retired met at the July 15 at president, repeating Sixteen call. had attended reports and Beulah meeting at gave a talk of having little children introduce organized learning situations to help them to learn to read, etc. Maxine Walker attended the state clue to weather changes When a storm is brewing, cats 'r groom themselves and cows overeat. Animal diseases increase, flies bite and hogs sometimes make "storm shelter" -nests of sticks and cobs. During periods of a fuji moon, many farmers won't castrate their animals (and some human doctors won't perform surgery, either). "It seems animals-including hu- mans--just naturally respond to changes in the weather," said Dr. Bonnard Moseley, University of Mlssonri-Columbia veterinar/an. Moseley has made a hobby of studying animals' reactions to the weather and trying to separate facts from folklore. "It's amazing how observant people were about the weather centuries ago," said Moseley, who grew up in rural South Central Missouri before modern mass communications reached the Ozark Hills. He and his farmer neighbors learned to rely on animal signs for clues to future weather. What they observed was often based on changes in barometric pressure which drops before a storm. Swallows and other birds have sensitive ears that are affected by slight pressure changes. They fly low before a storm to compeusafe for the pressure drop. As for tidy cats, static electricity chargingthe air before a summer storm makes them feel dirty. It separates their coat hairs, and cats hurry to smooth them again. Feedlot operators report that cattle eat more before severe weather, sometimes to the point of overeating. "Most metabolic diseases of animals --like milk fever and grass tetany-- occur before severe changes in weather," Moseley said. "As a veterinarian, I've noticed that most calving activity occurs before storms or major changes in weather and almost none occurs when storms are at their peak." He said humans are likewise affected by the weather. "The World Health Organization in a survey of over a million people said the death rate increases 15 percent ahead of a major change in the weather," Moseley said. "When the barometer is low, people -- tend tobe depressml and don't perform as well as they should. Studies show their reflexes are 6 percent slower. "In the 1700s, the Bank of England conference at Bunker Hi]] Resort near sent its employees home during Mt. Grove, Mo., for a five day meeting pressure drops because they made which she enjoyed. The resort is-more mistakes then.', Both farm animals and people also sponsored and financed by the Mo.i State Association and is available for Mo. State meetings and the enjoyment of teachers throughout the year. The guest speaker was Oneta Mye, high school guidance counselor at Highland. She told of the many duties she performs to help students with their individual problems and ways to solve them. She also stressed the importance of planning with each student the subjects he wants to take as soon as he is in juinor high school for the work or career he is planning to follow when he graduates. After the meeting Mrs. Luker and respond to good weather. "Spring fever, for example is a real phenomenon," Moseley said. "You'll see horses running and waving their tails high in the air, showing off how good they feel." As for the full moon phenomenon, Moseley said there is some "good evidence" of its effects. "I know many farmers who won't castrate their animals during the full moon phase, and I heard one surgeon Mrs. Gould served refreshments. The time and place of the next Mailbox meeting in September will be announced later. Joe Quinn at convention of independent agents Joe Quinn of Canton Insurance attended the 86th Annual Convention of the Independent Insurance Agents of Missouri July 18-2o at the Lake of the Ozarks. The convention featured educational sessions on management, new ideas for streamlining agency operations and servicing insureds, and an overview of changes in commercial lines insurance that will be introduced in 1986." Featured at the convention was an appearance by Tom Heinsohn, former Boston Celtics all-star forward and coach, who is now a basketball analyst for CBS Sports. Over 1,000 persons attended the tlp-ee-day event. " The Independent Insurance Agents of Missouri is an association whose membership consists of nearly 650 of the state's independent insurance agencies, and over 1,500 license insurance agents and brokers. Its members sell all lines of insurance: property, casualty, life, and health. They are identified by the sign of the big 'T'. Letters From Our Readers III To The Press-News Journal: Many people in the Lewis County region of northeast Missouri feel as if the economic viability of the area is slowly dwindling, wilting on the vine as we watch. I must confes that I too, have observed this and at several times attempted to speak out upon the subject. For far too long the citizens of Lewis County have been contented making a living doing one of five things: 1. Being or working with a farmer. 2. Operating in the service sector (small town business). 3. Working for Culver.Stockton. 4. Working in Quincy-using Lewis County as a suburb envirmment. 5. Welfare. This is not to be taken wrong! There is absolutely nothing wrong with farming or being a small town businessman. There is nothing wrong with working for the college or 00iserking in Quincy. However, as recent istory has shown, none of these are enough to secure Lewis County's economic viability. Anybody who lost a job in Quincy due to the closing of Electric Wheel or, even farther back in time, Motorola, can tell you that replacing that job can be next to impossible. It's near impossible to find work in Quincy today and worse yet right here at home! We can no longer be content to look at Lewis County as simply a suburb for the Quincy work force. Even farming has shown severe econom_ic strains and along with that the entire service sector for farming. Many may be confused with what I mean by service sector. Simply put it is the small rural communities in which you will find grbceries, spare Press.News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, July 25, 1985, Page " Rte C change Work Is progressing on Route C improvement, which includes ellati d mini sharp curves. This area near the Route C-Route CC Junction shows the new road wlth blacktop at right and the current road at left. in Tallahassee, Fla., who won't perform surgery during this time," he said. "The Florida doctor had a nurse who kept careful records which showed hemorrhages were increased substan- tially during '.hose times. So the doctor said he would not perform surgery then and would instead reserve the time for romance!" While Dr Moseley said some of these associations between environ- mental phenomena and animal be- havior are reliable, he's skeptical about a few. One is the comm0oly held belief that a preponderance of black, wooly caterpillars is a sure  that a severe winter is coming. "I've talked with entomologists about this, and they say that whether caterpillars are black or wooly depends on the species," Mose|ey said "This is one piece of folklore that doesn't work for me." at does work--most of the time-is what Moseley calls the "law of averages." Take this year, for examlge. "I predicted an early spring simply because we had two late ones in 1963-84," Meseley said. Using that philosophy, he's expecting. another dry summer. "It seems that one extreme always follows another," be.aid. " "We had rains 16 of So days in June in mid-Missouri. I'm f-ful of another dry July and August. "But this year farmers had a chance to plant earlier. They're in better shape, because they have more subsoil moisture. "I predict a fairly good summer and pretty good crop yields this year." parts, hair cuts, physician care, banking, clothing and on and on. Ask most any farmer and they will probably tell you just how badly battered they are after five bad years of high interest, falling equity, and over-all weak crop prices. Several farmers that 1 know personally have been forced to get outside jobs just to make the ends meet. As for the service sector any business man that keeps long term records can tell you just how bad the economic envirommmt is. Although this letter has sounded bleak there is some hope on the horizon. A number sol concerned citizens . countywide have joined together to create the Lewis County Developmental Corp., a n0n-profit corporation with the specific goal of mproving the economic environment of Lewis County. Presently the Corp. is working towards raising funds which will eventually lead to a regional airport in the area. With a regional airport the region will have one of the best mixes of transportation avaikble anYWhere. Along with that eemm an easier job of selling our region to interested businem wanting to find new places for production. Some might wonder as to the value of an airport but a little thought will show many valued aspects: 1. Emergency evaucatioa of injured. 2. Emergency reliefin time of disaster. 3. Crop servicing from the air. 4. Jobs in construction, maintemmce and expansion. 5. Jobs in aircraft related -vices. 6. Shipping of goods and services in and out of the area. 7. Human transportati of travel- lers, businessmen, , etc. 8. Jobs in industries wh/ch may use airport for shipping. 9. Completion of regl's . tion system. I0. Sends a signal to prospective businesses of our progressive nature. We can no longer depend upon Quincy, Keokuk, or Hannibal for our economic well being. We can no longer depend utn farmi aloe. We can no MANLEY BEASLEY MARTHE BEASLEY 1 Midwest Bsb eConference July 29-31 at Hannibal Church leaders from throughout the midwest are expected to take part in a three-day program of preaching 9nd music July 29-31 when Hannihal-La- Grange College, Hannibal, holds its second annual Midwest Bible Confer- once. Manley Beasley, an evangelist from Euless, Tex., will be the keynote speaker. Preaching and music evange- lists from the region will be featured on the program. The conference sessions will be held in McKenzie Auditorium on the H-LG campus. Dr. Larry Lewis is president of Hannibal-LaGrange College. The conference will begin Monday at 1 p.m. and will continue with morning, afternoon and evening sessions longer depend upon the college alone. Instead we must strive to achieve a complex and complementary blend of industry and businesses which together will greatly improve our economic security so that if one sector of the economy is hurting it, doesn't destroy the entire economy. Otherwise the largest single industry in Lewis County may well turn out to be Welfare! If you are interested in progress and improving the economic environment of our region you can help by supporting the Lewis County Develop. ment Corp., Box. 321, Canton, Mo. 63435, by joining or by donations. All can benefit from your action especially the upcoming generations. Dr. G. L. Collier, Canton CANTON through noon Wednesday. Conference participants may arrange for lodging in the college dormitories for $I0 per person per night, and $5 for each additional family member. Meal . tickets may be purchased for $17.50. Advanced registration is encouraged and may be made by writing: Dale Smith, Midwest Bible Conferenc(T Coordinator, Hannibal-LaGrange Col- lege, Hannibal, Mo. 63401, or calling (314) 221-3675, ext. 233. Attends dance convention in Chicago During the week of July 15-21, 21 members of the Cheryl Kaiser School of Dance attended the, Chicago National Association of Dance Masters Convention and Ballet Forum. Sarah Kenney, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Kenney of Canton, a senior student of Cheryl Kaiser, participated in the ballet forum and training school and performed in the student review on July 21, and the ballet gala July 18. Throughout the week dance classes consisting of tap, jazz, ballet, modern and musical comedy were taken under the direction of a number of renowned and credentialed dancers and dance educators. Two favorite faculty persons were Fred Kelly, brother of famous dancer Gone Kelly, and Bob Fitch who has appeared in 21 Broadway shows, including ',Annie" in the role of "Rooster." COMMUNITY ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 3r00l ANNUAL HOG ROAST Saturday, July 27 CANTON BALL PARK Youth Ball Games begin at 4gO0 p.m. Merving to begin at 4:30 TICItETM s2.O0 Older Women's Game at 8:00 P.m. Older Men's Game st 8:30 p.m. (mJoY mvw HmTAG00 OAYS AT mt BALL PAIX)