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August 8, 1985     Press-News Journal
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ITORIAL 8, OPINION Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, August 8, 1985, Page 1 b 3 i ing "2 ERYEAR'S supplied by shows north" in PICTURES AGO Lewistown, circa 1914. The corner framed building is on the present site of the Lewistown State R-V will open the time Canton Town standard time. 1:30 a.m. and will P.m. Four new been added for  12. Mrs. Dorothy . teach Special lan will teach schi--even-a flat tire. Williamstown, and James Robert Johnson of Ewing. so YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News August 15, 1935 To compile history - Hen. James T. Lloyd asks cooperation in this important work. This newspaper would like to see Mr. Lloyd have the cooperation of the whole county, that the result will be a history that will be a source of pride to all Lewis Countians. John Kroeger, 74, of Durham was found dead in bed early Saturday. Nattie Wagner arrived home Friday from California making the trip in his truck in just three days, without event - just drove incessantly at a steady gait. He reports the Prof. L. J. Graham family made the trip without will teach Crowell will and Driver's coach at was initiated Academic will receive in Physical of Canton, died August 4. G. Watson of 50th wedding Vlth open house Church. Mr. Years ago from and paper nter, 88, of 4 in Blessing 77, of 6 in St. Schultz was pastor of Lewistown Churches of Chapel. served jjs Methodist the scene Sunday in anniversary of church. The in charge of basket the noon la'esented wi O.P. recognized as present. John Mr. and Mrs. child; Mr. s of the most Kenneth distance. Poet 578 of met at the and installed Hetzler, first vice; John Sharpe, Z. Porter at by the State wel'e Davis of Herbert Welker, Mrs. Joseph Reischling, 73, died at her home in St. Patrick on August 7. Camp Clark Buckner of West Plains, son of G. W. Buckner and a graduate of Culver-Stockton College, will open headquarters in Jefferson City, where he will direct the work of the National Youth Administration in Missouri. His appointment to the $4,500 federal job was formally approved last week after Buckner had been recommended by Senators Clark and Truman. Buckner ./is a newspaper publisher at West Plains. 6O YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August 14, 1925 Dr. Ferris J. Stephens will head a new department, Old Testament and Semetic Languages, at Odver-Stoekton College this fall. Joy Kistler has been selected as coach and physical director, Mr. and Mrs. Griffith Gordon, graduates of Bush Conserva- tory of Music, Chicago, will teach voice and public school music and direct orchestra and glee clubs. Other new instructors are Miss Retha E. Breese, who will teach education, and H. G. Harmon who. will teach history and economics.- It is said that the state's surveyors will be in this county in a few days to go over Route 6 and make some changes from the route as it now runs. There seems little question but the route will run from this place to Edina parallel with the OK road on the north side and will do away with many of the crooks and turns between those two towns. Lewistown Record The shipment of 1,734 carloads of gravel out of LaGrange by rail during the month of July brought the number of carloads shipped this season 'to 4,065. More than two-thirds of this amount of gravel has been shipped from the state's gravel pit, south of town. About 1,200 carloads of river gravel have been shipped by the Missouri Gravel Co., and a few carloads by the Keokuk Sand Co. LaGrange Indicator Dr. and Mrs. H. B. Robison were made happy Friday by the arrival from Japan of their daughter, Amy Jean, now Mrs. Sarvis, and her husband and baby whom the grand- parents had not seen. A young Japanese student, Juno, accompanied them and will enter Culver-Stockton College in September. Canton James McRoberts, Clay Birder and Carl Birk, three bright Canton youths, have entered the federal training camp at Des Moines, for a month of training, studying and recreational sports. Art M. Pilcher, 50, the dean of the barbers in Canton, passed away t his / Bank. At right is the bewistown Bank. Other buildings along the street have been razed, remodeled or changed. home on White Street Wednesday. Mrs. Louise Hohmann, 83, died in her home in Canton August 6. abed Thomas Lillard, 28, passed away August 6 at the new hospital in Canton. Philip J. Miller, 68, a retired business man, but for many years identified with the business life of Canton, died at Graham Hospital in Keokuk August 10. Funeral services were conducted at the residence in Canton. 70 YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August 17, 1915 President Earl M. Todd was in Hannibal the first of the week in interest of the C. U. Library to which six thousand of the newest and best books are being added. Much time has been spent by members of the faculty I II Up and Down. Ten commandments for the Countrys,de paints of exhibitors care for the animal for thou art trying has the animals entered and the to teach responsibility, reghtratlea and health Impers In David Steinbeck We found the following "Ten Commandments for Parents of Youth Showing at the Fair" in the most recent issue of 4-H Happenings, published by the Marion-Lewis County 4-H Youth Extension Specialist, Barry C. Link. We think it might be appropriate not only for 4-H parents, bat parents whose youngsters are ,,showing" in many other areas, in which they are engaged in eompetitiou with their peers. We thought it worthy of sharing with all our readers: 1) Thou shalt not feed, train, and Mailbox I Letters From Our Readers I Old fair photo Dear Editor: Reference is made to page lb of the July 11, 1965, issue with a picture of the Lewis CO. Fair, Monticello, Mo., Sept. 26 to 29, 1911. I don't know now what day the picture was taken, however, I do know that I attended ead of those 26 to 29 days, because of heavy rain falls flooding the streams at this time and it was impassibie for me to return home to father's farm, and I was accommodated in a friend's home for several days. His name was Brine. I remember 1911 was a dry season, with heavy rain fall with resulti.ng floods in the early fall. I would appreciate just a full page lb of the July II issue. ! have a remembrance of much of the activity of the Lewis CO. Fair and of the buildings there of that time which material was hauled from canton by team and wagon. My father marketed hay, grain, feed and lik at Canton, so on numerous inns of hauling some to market, I wuld haul a load of material on the  tip. I have quite an interest in reading of Lewis Co. Fairs in these modern times. in revising the lists of books that have Generally the paper is received here been carefully gathered during the in tiptop condition; this time the page year, and dealers are now preparing  Ib was received quite mutilated. I en- joy your lovely newsy publication of the county and state of which I was born in 1893. Sincerely, Tollie Graves ii lath Dist. Newsletter S-tate Senator Norman merrell i iii I I and submitting their bids for the same. C.U. Notes 1oo YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August 17, 1885 x The LaBelle Trotting Club has ecured the celebrated Racket Band of Quincy to furnish the music for the Trotting meeting on Aug. 26 and 27. The prospects are that the Trot will be largely attended. Mrs. Jno. Ray of Canton township died on Wednesday night from injuries received by being thrown from a buggy during a run away near Newark some ,weeks ago. A barbershop and restaurant has been opened up in Bruce's old stand by William Bowen of Canton. For a clean shave, nice haircut, confectionery of any kind, etc., this is the place to go. This is an enterprise Monticello greatly needs. Uncle Jimmy IAllard will preach at Overton School house the second Sab- bath afternoon of vach month at 3. Dickerson Mrs. Sallie A. E. Williams has in her possession and has been wearing a set of dress buttons that came across the sea from England more than 50 years ago. Dickerson Wesley Smith, while breaking up a seven acre piece of sod on Mr. Million's farm, adjoining D. R. Scott' this summer, killed 17 rattlesnakes. 2) Thou shult forgive a child for making mistakes In the showring for thou hath made mistakes too. 3) Thou shalt not get mad when the child forgets items in the show box, for one day thou may forget the show box. 4) Thou shait help the show mamqmmt for they are doing a Job that tJumwuM nt want to do. 5) Thou shalt be sure that the child is on time for all the show activities for thou would not want to wait on another exhibitor 6) Thou shalt be sure that the child , Fundays experience Dear Editor: As individuals and as organizations we had a wonderful experience the first weekend of August in Canton. We sponsored Fun Days in the Park and it was a time of fellowship. We appreciate the cooperation of all who attended; the merchants who con- tributed prizes and gifts; the crafters; and our members who provided cakes and articles for the table. The Willard Hetzler Band from Lewistown; the Lamps Hi Rise Kitchen Band from Quincy; and the Zentelene Huse and Group from LaBelle generously contributed their most enjoyable music. The pastor of the Life Tabernacle Church even let us use his piano. The most heart-warming experience was the action of the children who participated in the games. Many of these youngsters took their prize money and bought gifts for their parents. That is generosity! Officers of Post & Aux. 4083 VFW A-Bomb anniversary II I II New law will help those fighting crime Laws to fight crime are an important part of the many protections provided by state government. Each session lawmakers consider bills to crack down on criminals, with the hope that stronger laws and stricter enforcement will help most citizens escape the experience of being a crime victim. One important crime-fighting bill passed during the 1985 session will help law enforcement officials obtain incriminating evidence against those involved in white-collar and organized crime. The legislation allow limited immunity from prosecution for special witnesses who cooperate in providing such evidence in criminal trials. Dear Editor: This is the week commemorating the 40th anniversary of the U.S, bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945. Some 64,000 people died at Hiro- shima within four months, two-thirds of them on the first day. (Imagine every person in Quincy dead in one day.) Over the years to come, many more thousands would die of delayed effects. Yet since the end of World War II, the superpowers' snowballing arms race has created nuclear arsenals with a total destructive power many thousands of times that of the Similar witness immunity laws have helped other states and the federal government fight the underworld crime elements that usually are protected by layers of middlemen. Under the measure, the state attorney general must approve cases of immunity to insure that the new power is not misused, and witnesses who refuse to provide testimony after being given immunity could face contempt of court citations and up to one year in prison. Another bill passed zeroes in on the crimes of cable television fraud, prison escape, library theft, pharmacy robbery and leaving the scene of an accident. The bill also allows the confiscation of property that has been used or obtained from criminal activities. If a car, for example, has been used to transport illegal drugs, it could be seized by the authorities. Other crimes given harsher penalties under the measure include setting potentially harmful "booby traps" to protect marijuana crops or using or possessing metal penetrating "super bullets" during the commission of a crime. A third bill makes it a felony to steal a U.S. flag intended for open display or live commercial fish valued at more than $75. H Farmer's Crops look good, but . . . though I have an excellent crop, other economic forces are bearing down on me to such an extent that this great bounty is negated. Today the word "farmer" has more diverse meanings than at any time in my lifetime. It's implication stretches all the way from rich or well-to-do at one extreme to insolvency at the other. When we pass over the barrier that separates the 20th century from the 21st, in 15 short years, we may well look back on the decade of the 1970s as the time when farmers ascended the mountaintop. The following decade may reveal the descent into the maelstrom. The 1970s was the decade of the $50,000 tractor; the $4,000 land. It was the time that saw inflation rise to 22 percent and fall to 3 percent. It was For some it may still be a time when the forest cannot be seen for the trees; for others a situation where the men have been separated from the boys. Ten years ago land was a seller's market; today it is a buyer's market. Because of economic prerogatives set in place in the days of Roosevelt, when men reach the end of the tether they could invoke the blessings of government subsidy. But bow lung, O Israel; how long? For different reasons farmers have different reactions to the condition of today's field crops. And there are always the certain few who complain about everything. In a year such as this a Congressman said to a constituent: "With suchgreat crops and prices you can live with, isn't the time that saw the historic interest everything about all right with you this rates of 6 percent double and" year? .... re-double. It was a time of paradise The farmer mumbled: "But a big and paradise lost. crop is awfully hard on the, ground." Journal by the designated time. 7) Thou shalt teach the child that winning a blue ribbon is a desirable goal but making friends along the way is a more worthy goal. 8) Thou shult not complain about the Judge, for it is his or her oInlo Umt has been sought. 9)Thou shalt not forget that livestock projects are teaching projects, not necessarily money making projects. 1O) Thou shait remember that the fair is s family event and should be supported and enjoyed by the entire family. Hiroehima bomb. In 1945, many of the scientists who worked to develop the bomb believed that its great power, far from spurring an arms race, would mean an end to war. Victor Weisskopf, one of the bomb's designers, remembers "We thought such powerful weapons would make wars between great powers unthinkable. Some of us thought that the existence of these dangerous sources of destructive power would lead to an international administration of military and peaceful apications and would end the age-old  of organized mutual mass murder. It was i a great and innovative idea, but neither side was ready for it. We were naive, perhaps; we should have known better." Today the development of new, more sophisticated weapons is sustained by a momentum divorced from any rational justification for them. Far and distrust impel the superpv,vers to enlarge and enhance their stockpiles even as new weapons diminish their security. To escape from this quan- dary of the nuclear age. scientists and statesmen must find new ways of thinking about an old problem. Victor Weisskopf put it thus "The old slogan 'Si vis pacem para bellum' (if you want peace, prepare for war) written on a war memorial in my home town of Vienna, may have been true with old-fashioned weapons. Today our only hope is prevention by remov the causes of war." --Source, Union of Coneerned Scientists, quarterly publication Nucleus, Volume 7, number 2, summer 1985. Sincerely, Lisa Wigoda Union Township I00eith Wilkey I III In 1863 when General Stonewall Jackson led his ragged Confederate Army, with its gaunt and bony horses into the valley of Shenandoah, the General gazed into the lush valley that spread before him with its bumper field crops, and in the words of Whittier, it was "as fair as the Garden of the Lord." I am not knowledgeable of field crop conditions in the vast midwestern cornbelt, but in my little corner of the world, they never looked better. In fact, I don't think they ever looked as good. To some farmers this is a source of satisfaction; of gratification; of thanksgiving. To others it is a situation of, "Well...the crops do look good, but...". What they are mying is that LEWIS COUNTY COURT LAND TRANSFERS Bill Daak and Geraldine Dank to David Michel and Betty Michel. Terry R. Moore and Paula L. Moore to John Boulware and Ellen Boulware, Clark Chrisman and Claudia Chris. man to William C. Knoles and Lil]ie M. Knoles. George W. Shumate and Jo Elle Shumate to Dorothy E. Gilloepie and John A. Shumate. Palmyra Saving & Building to Randall Hicks and Patsy Hicks. Palmyra Saving & Building to James R. Kirchner and Mary M. Ki_rchner. Linda Lay to Bernard K. Ayres and Audrey M. Ayres. Marvin L. Smith and Martin A. Smith to Joy L. Hayden. Daniel J. McLaughlin to Thomas C. Bunting and Reba J. Bunting. Federal Land Bank to Everett l. Parson and Carrie Parson and Joan Nunan. Leland Phillips and Peggy Phillips to Donald E. Lawman and Marjory P. Lawman. Charles A. Yenter, Jr., to Zentallne Huse, Sally Papa, Robert D. Papa and .....  John Stutsman. Russsell Loglon and Patsy and Marvin Wellman and Barbara Wellman. G. Leu Stevenson tO r Junior L. Lee and Sarah M. Lee. Anna Cline, Thomas Cllne, Cline, Gary Mohr and Carol Edward L. Staggs Stas. Bill Berhorst and Marie Robert Miller and Sophia John H. Foster to WlUl Desvaux and Dorothy L. DesvaOZ. Walter D. Whitmer and Derothy H: Whltmer to Lynn E. Stevens anna Maureen E. Spvens. i Palmyra Saving & Building to. I Jimmy W. Shanks and Glenna _ ! Shanks. Palmyra Saving & Building to Steven A. Hampton and Hazel L. Hampton. Charles A. Norris and Brenda K. Norris to Wilbur W. Lawrence, Jr., and Nona K, Lawrence. Glenn M. Scldager and Virginia L. Schlager to Billy N. Fee and Elizabeth Fee. exander T. Griffith and Margareg R. Grifflth and Charles F. Brown Billy N. Fee and Elizabeth Fee. ITORIAL 8, OPINION Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, August 8, 1985, Page 1 b 3 i ing "2 ERYEAR'S supplied by shows north" in PICTURES AGO Lewistown, circa 1914. The corner framed building is on the present site of the Lewistown State R-V will open the time Canton Town standard time. 1:30 a.m. and will P.m. Four new been added for  12. Mrs. Dorothy . teach Special lan will teach schi--even-a flat tire. Williamstown, and James Robert Johnson of Ewing. so YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News August 15, 1935 To compile history - Hen. James T. Lloyd asks cooperation in this important work. This newspaper would like to see Mr. Lloyd have the cooperation of the whole county, that the result will be a history that will be a source of pride to all Lewis Countians. John Kroeger, 74, of Durham was found dead in bed early Saturday. Nattie Wagner arrived home Friday from California making the trip in his truck in just three days, without event - just drove incessantly at a steady gait. He reports the Prof. L. J. Graham family made the trip without will teach Crowell will and Driver's coach at was initiated Academic will receive in Physical of Canton, died August 4. G. Watson of 50th wedding Vlth open house Church. Mr. Years ago from and paper nter, 88, of 4 in Blessing 77, of 6 in St. Schultz was pastor of Lewistown Churches of Chapel. served jjs Methodist the scene Sunday in anniversary of church. The in charge of basket the noon la'esented wi O.P. recognized as present. John Mr. and Mrs. child; Mr. s of the most Kenneth distance. Poet 578 of met at the and installed Hetzler, first vice; John Sharpe, Z. Porter at by the State wel'e Davis of Herbert Welker, Mrs. Joseph Reischling, 73, died at her home in St. Patrick on August 7. Camp Clark Buckner of West Plains, son of G. W. Buckner and a graduate of Culver-Stockton College, will open headquarters in Jefferson City, where he will direct the work of the National Youth Administration in Missouri. His appointment to the $4,500 federal job was formally approved last week after Buckner had been recommended by Senators Clark and Truman. Buckner ./is a newspaper publisher at West Plains. 6O YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August 14, 1925 Dr. Ferris J. Stephens will head a new department, Old Testament and Semetic Languages, at Odver-Stoekton College this fall. Joy Kistler has been selected as coach and physical director, Mr. and Mrs. Griffith Gordon, graduates of Bush Conserva- tory of Music, Chicago, will teach voice and public school music and direct orchestra and glee clubs. Other new instructors are Miss Retha E. Breese, who will teach education, and H. G. Harmon who. will teach history and economics.- It is said that the state's surveyors will be in this county in a few days to go over Route 6 and make some changes from the route as it now runs. There seems little question but the route will run from this place to Edina parallel with the OK road on the north side and will do away with many of the crooks and turns between those two towns. Lewistown Record The shipment of 1,734 carloads of gravel out of LaGrange by rail during the month of July brought the number of carloads shipped this season 'to 4,065. More than two-thirds of this amount of gravel has been shipped from the state's gravel pit, south of town. About 1,200 carloads of river gravel have been shipped by the Missouri Gravel Co., and a few carloads by the Keokuk Sand Co. LaGrange Indicator Dr. and Mrs. H. B. Robison were made happy Friday by the arrival from Japan of their daughter, Amy Jean, now Mrs. Sarvis, and her husband and baby whom the grand- parents had not seen. A young Japanese student, Juno, accompanied them and will enter Culver-Stockton College in September. Canton James McRoberts, Clay Birder and Carl Birk, three bright Canton youths, have entered the federal training camp at Des Moines, for a month of training, studying and recreational sports. Art M. Pilcher, 50, the dean of the barbers in Canton, passed away t his / Bank. At right is the bewistown Bank. Other buildings along the street have been razed, remodeled or changed. home on White Street Wednesday. Mrs. Louise Hohmann, 83, died in her home in Canton August 6. abed Thomas Lillard, 28, passed away August 6 at the new hospital in Canton. Philip J. Miller, 68, a retired business man, but for many years identified with the business life of Canton, died at Graham Hospital in Keokuk August 10. Funeral services were conducted at the residence in Canton. 70 YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August 17, 1915 President Earl M. Todd was in Hannibal the first of the week in interest of the C. U. Library to which six thousand of the newest and best books are being added. Much time has been spent by members of the faculty I II Up and Down. Ten commandments for the Countrys,de paints of exhibitors care for the animal for thou art trying has the animals entered and the to teach responsibility, reghtratlea and health Impers In David Steinbeck We found the following "Ten Commandments for Parents of Youth Showing at the Fair" in the most recent issue of 4-H Happenings, published by the Marion-Lewis County 4-H Youth Extension Specialist, Barry C. Link. We think it might be appropriate not only for 4-H parents, bat parents whose youngsters are ,,showing" in many other areas, in which they are engaged in eompetitiou with their peers. We thought it worthy of sharing with all our readers: 1) Thou shalt not feed, train, and Mailbox I Letters From Our Readers I Old fair photo Dear Editor: Reference is made to page lb of the July 11, 1965, issue with a picture of the Lewis CO. Fair, Monticello, Mo., Sept. 26 to 29, 1911. I don't know now what day the picture was taken, however, I do know that I attended ead of those 26 to 29 days, because of heavy rain falls flooding the streams at this time and it was impassibie for me to return home to father's farm, and I was accommodated in a friend's home for several days. His name was Brine. I remember 1911 was a dry season, with heavy rain fall with resulti.ng floods in the early fall. I would appreciate just a full page lb of the July II issue. ! have a remembrance of much of the activity of the Lewis CO. Fair and of the buildings there of that time which material was hauled from canton by team and wagon. My father marketed hay, grain, feed and lik at Canton, so on numerous inns of hauling some to market, I wuld haul a load of material on the  tip. I have quite an interest in reading of Lewis Co. Fairs in these modern times. in revising the lists of books that have Generally the paper is received here been carefully gathered during the in tiptop condition; this time the page year, and dealers are now preparing  Ib was received quite mutilated. I en- joy your lovely newsy publication of the county and state of which I was born in 1893. Sincerely, Tollie Graves ii lath Dist. Newsletter S-tate Senator Norman merrell i iii I I and submitting their bids for the same. C.U. Notes 1oo YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August 17, 1885 x The LaBelle Trotting Club has ecured the celebrated Racket Band of Quincy to furnish the music for the Trotting meeting on Aug. 26 and 27. The prospects are that the Trot will be largely attended. Mrs. Jno. Ray of Canton township died on Wednesday night from injuries received by being thrown from a buggy during a run away near Newark some ,weeks ago. A barbershop and restaurant has been opened up in Bruce's old stand by William Bowen of Canton. For a clean shave, nice haircut, confectionery of any kind, etc., this is the place to go. This is an enterprise Monticello greatly needs. Uncle Jimmy IAllard will preach at Overton School house the second Sab- bath afternoon of vach month at 3. Dickerson Mrs. Sallie A. E. Williams has in her possession and has been wearing a set of dress buttons that came across the sea from England more than 50 years ago. Dickerson Wesley Smith, while breaking up a seven acre piece of sod on Mr. Million's farm, adjoining D. R. Scott' this summer, killed 17 rattlesnakes. 2) Thou shult forgive a child for making mistakes In the showring for thou hath made mistakes too. 3) Thou shalt not get mad when the child forgets items in the show box, for one day thou may forget the show box. 4) Thou shait help the show mamqmmt for they are doing a Job that tJumwuM nt want to do. 5) Thou shalt be sure that the child is on time for all the show activities for thou would not want to wait on another exhibitor 6) Thou shalt be sure that the child , Fundays experience Dear Editor: As individuals and as organizations we had a wonderful experience the first weekend of August in Canton. We sponsored Fun Days in the Park and it was a time of fellowship. We appreciate the cooperation of all who attended; the merchants who con- tributed prizes and gifts; the crafters; and our members who provided cakes and articles for the table. The Willard Hetzler Band from Lewistown; the Lamps Hi Rise Kitchen Band from Quincy; and the Zentelene Huse and Group from LaBelle generously contributed their most enjoyable music. The pastor of the Life Tabernacle Church even let us use his piano. The most heart-warming experience was the action of the children who participated in the games. Many of these youngsters took their prize money and bought gifts for their parents. That is generosity! Officers of Post & Aux. 4083 VFW A-Bomb anniversary II I II New law will help those fighting crime Laws to fight crime are an important part of the many protections provided by state government. Each session lawmakers consider bills to crack down on criminals, with the hope that stronger laws and stricter enforcement will help most citizens escape the experience of being a crime victim. One important crime-fighting bill passed during the 1985 session will help law enforcement officials obtain incriminating evidence against those involved in white-collar and organized crime. The legislation allow limited immunity from prosecution for special witnesses who cooperate in providing such evidence in criminal trials. Dear Editor: This is the week commemorating the 40th anniversary of the U.S, bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945. Some 64,000 people died at Hiro- shima within four months, two-thirds of them on the first day. (Imagine every person in Quincy dead in one day.) Over the years to come, many more thousands would die of delayed effects. Yet since the end of World War II, the superpowers' snowballing arms race has created nuclear arsenals with a total destructive power many thousands of times that of the Similar witness immunity laws have helped other states and the federal government fight the underworld crime elements that usually are protected by layers of middlemen. Under the measure, the state attorney general must approve cases of immunity to insure that the new power is not misused, and witnesses who refuse to provide testimony after being given immunity could face contempt of court citations and up to one year in prison. Another bill passed zeroes in on the crimes of cable television fraud, prison escape, library theft, pharmacy robbery and leaving the scene of an accident. The bill also allows the confiscation of property that has been used or obtained from criminal activities. If a car, for example, has been used to transport illegal drugs, it could be seized by the authorities. Other crimes given harsher penalties under the measure include setting potentially harmful "booby traps" to protect marijuana crops or using or possessing metal penetrating "super bullets" during the commission of a crime. A third bill makes it a felony to steal a U.S. flag intended for open display or live commercial fish valued at more than $75. H Farmer's Crops look good, but . . . though I have an excellent crop, other economic forces are bearing down on me to such an extent that this great bounty is negated. Today the word "farmer" has more diverse meanings than at any time in my lifetime. It's implication stretches all the way from rich or well-to-do at one extreme to insolvency at the other. When we pass over the barrier that separates the 20th century from the 21st, in 15 short years, we may well look back on the decade of the 1970s as the time when farmers ascended the mountaintop. The following decade may reveal the descent into the maelstrom. The 1970s was the decade of the $50,000 tractor; the $4,000 land. It was the time that saw inflation rise to 22 percent and fall to 3 percent. It was For some it may still be a time when the forest cannot be seen for the trees; for others a situation where the men have been separated from the boys. Ten years ago land was a seller's market; today it is a buyer's market. Because of economic prerogatives set in place in the days of Roosevelt, when men reach the end of the tether they could invoke the blessings of government subsidy. But bow lung, O Israel; how long? For different reasons farmers have different reactions to the condition of today's field crops. And there are always the certain few who complain about everything. In a year such as this a Congressman said to a constituent: "With suchgreat crops and prices you can live with, isn't the time that saw the historic interest everything about all right with you this rates of 6 percent double and" year? .... re-double. It was a time of paradise The farmer mumbled: "But a big and paradise lost. crop is awfully hard on the, ground." Journal by the designated time. 7) Thou shalt teach the child that winning a blue ribbon is a desirable goal but making friends along the way is a more worthy goal. 8) Thou shult not complain about the Judge, for it is his or her oInlo Umt has been sought. 9)Thou shalt not forget that livestock projects are teaching projects, not necessarily money making projects. 1O) Thou shait remember that the fair is s family event and should be supported and enjoyed by the entire family. Hiroehima bomb. In 1945, many of the scientists who worked to develop the bomb believed that its great power, far from spurring an arms race, would mean an end to war. Victor Weisskopf, one of the bomb's designers, remembers "We thought such powerful weapons would make wars between great powers unthinkable. Some of us thought that the existence of these dangerous sources of destructive power would lead to an international administration of military and peaceful apications and would end the age-old  of organized mutual mass murder. It was i a great and innovative idea, but neither side was ready for it. We were naive, perhaps; we should have known better." Today the development of new, more sophisticated weapons is sustained by a momentum divorced from any rational justification for them. Far and distrust impel the superpv,vers to enlarge and enhance their stockpiles even as new weapons diminish their security. To escape from this quan- dary of the nuclear age. scientists and statesmen must find new ways of thinking about an old problem. Victor Weisskopf put it thus "The old slogan 'Si vis pacem para bellum' (if you want peace, prepare for war) written on a war memorial in my home town of Vienna, may have been true with old-fashioned weapons. Today our only hope is prevention by remov the causes of war." --Source, Union of Coneerned Scientists, quarterly publication Nucleus, Volume 7, number 2, summer 1985. Sincerely, Lisa Wigoda Union Township I00eith Wilkey I III In 1863 when General Stonewall Jackson led his ragged Confederate Army, with its gaunt and bony horses into the valley of Shenandoah, the General gazed into the lush valley that spread before him with its bumper field crops, and in the words of Whittier, it was "as fair as the Garden of the Lord." I am not knowledgeable of field crop conditions in the vast midwestern cornbelt, but in my little corner of the world, they never looked better. In fact, I don't think they ever looked as good. To some farmers this is a source of satisfaction; of gratification; of thanksgiving. To others it is a situation of, "Well...the crops do look good, but...". What they are mying is that LEWIS COUNTY COURT LAND TRANSFERS Bill Daak and Geraldine Dank to David Michel and Betty Michel. Terry R. Moore and Paula L. Moore to John Boulware and Ellen Boulware, Clark Chrisman and Claudia Chris. man to William C. Knoles and Lil]ie M. Knoles. George W. Shumate and Jo Elle Shumate to Dorothy E. Gilloepie and John A. Shumate. Palmyra Saving & Building to Randall Hicks and Patsy Hicks. Palmyra Saving & Building to James R. Kirchner and Mary M. Ki_rchner. Linda Lay to Bernard K. Ayres and Audrey M. Ayres. Marvin L. Smith and Martin A. Smith to Joy L. Hayden. Daniel J. McLaughlin to Thomas C. Bunting and Reba J. Bunting. Federal Land Bank to Everett l. Parson and Carrie Parson and Joan Nunan. Leland Phillips and Peggy Phillips to Donald E. Lawman and Marjory P. Lawman. Charles A. Yenter, Jr., to Zentallne Huse, Sally Papa, Robert D. Papa and .....  John Stutsman. Russsell Loglon and Patsy and Marvin Wellman and Barbara Wellman. G. Leu Stevenson tO r Junior L. Lee and Sarah M. Lee. Anna Cline, Thomas Cllne, Cline, Gary Mohr and Carol Edward L. Staggs Stas. Bill Berhorst and Marie Robert Miller and Sophia John H. Foster to WlUl Desvaux and Dorothy L. DesvaOZ. Walter D. Whitmer and Derothy H: Whltmer to Lynn E. Stevens anna Maureen E. Spvens. i Palmyra Saving & Building to. I Jimmy W. Shanks and Glenna _ ! Shanks. Palmyra Saving & Building to Steven A. Hampton and Hazel L. Hampton. Charles A. Norris and Brenda K. Norris to Wilbur W. Lawrence, Jr., and Nona K, Lawrence. Glenn M. Scldager and Virginia L. Schlager to Billy N. Fee and Elizabeth Fee. exander T. Griffith and Margareg R. Grifflth and Charles F. Brown Billy N. Fee and Elizabeth Fee.