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August 8, 1985     Press-News Journal
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N EIGH BORHOOD N EWS Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, August 8, 1985, Williamstown miss minnie Selway Moves fanfil from Sweden to Missouri David Murphy, son of Bill and Patsy Murphy, recently moved his family to Missouri from Sweden. Some of the family and friends who have come to visit them in the Murphy home were Mr. and Mrs. Norval Murphy, Adrain Timmons, Joyce Murphy, Mary Thom- son and Gary, Mr. and Mrs. John Romine and family, Patsy Nelson and Marci, Mr. and Mrs. Grover Murphy, Chet, Frank and Arlen Ewart, Randall Briscoe. The former Murphys are spending a while with his family. Mrs. Robert Hall spent the weekend with her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Randy McCoy of Springfield, Ill. The two grandsons returned home after a visit with their grandparents, Mr. and Hall. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Moore of Brashear spent a part of last week with Mrs. Erma Marsot and Margie. Two new ceiling fans have been installed in the Methodist Church. A ball game was played here Sunday with proceeds going to the fire department. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Selway and Dewayne visited Minnie Selway Tues- day, who was a patient in Blessing Hospital, Quincy. Rev Ted Davis was also a caller. Mrs. Joe Fryer is a patient in Blessing Hospital, Quincy. Mrs. Gertrude Bash was moved last week from Blessing Hospital to the Keokuk hospital. Mrs. Velma Doran and son, Bobby and family visited her Wednesday. The Daughtry sisters from Waco, Ia., spent last week with their grand- parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Tucker. Mr. and Mrs. Willie Brown and Mrs. Ella Minnerly of Colorado are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ben Minnerly. Mrs. Cathy Legg and children of Ewing were Wednesday guests of the June Legg family. Mrs. Rachel, .Brown and daughter, Jody Timmons Of Colorado, spent last week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Mumma. Mary Maxey was a Friday evening visitor in the Erma Marsot home. Dewayne Selway spent the weekend with his sister, Mr. and Mrs. John Roe of Brookfield. Chester St. Clair and Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Kerr of Luray were Sunday visitors of the former&apos;s mother, Mrs. Golden winner Judges selecting a winner - The "Colorado Gold", a 1933 Ford rod displayed by Jimmie Davolt of Macon, won the first place trophy in both the rod class and the interior class at the recent Lewis County Fair car show. The pickup, with glass floors throughout, was purchased by the Davolts last year from an elderly exhibitor in Colorado for a bargain price of $7,200. A western motif mural appears on the outside of each door. Davolts said that this gold colored vehicle has won many awards and has been exhibited in various shows in every section of the country, including the National Car Show. Second locks at Alton nearer to reality U.S. Senator Jack Danforth (R-Mo.) announced recently that the second chamber at Locks and Dam 26 is in position to reach the President's desk before Congress adjourns for August recess. Danforth said approval of construc- tion of the $220 million project came in Senate-House negotiations on the pending supplemental appropriations bill for fiscal year 1985. Danforth has been a long-time supporter of the second lock. The terms of the approval were worked out by Danforth 'in negotiations with the Administration. "The Midwest has.,waited a long time for this critically needed project," Danforth said. "Authoriza- tion is in sight at last on terms acceptable to our region, to the grain trade and to the barge industry." Locks and Dam 26 at Alton, Ill., is a major gateway for Mississippi River commerce. The existing facility.- more than 40 years old, is a major bottleneck for barge traffic. Congress authorized replacement of the existing dam and 1,200-foot lock in 1978. The new lock and dam is set to begin operation in 1988, with work on the existing job completed in 1990 at a cost of $757 million. Completion of the second lock, if authorized this year, could come by 1991 at a cost of $220 million. Up to this point, approval of the second lock had been held hostage by the Administration over the amount of money the industry would contribute through the tax on diesel fuel used by barges. The Administration had insisted that the tax finance the full cost of construction and 70 percent of the operating costs of the locks and dam. In order to support these costs, the Administration sought a doubling in the tax on barge fuel, now set to rise to I0 cents per gallon in October. Under an agreement involving Administration Danforth, the and the Senate leadership, the second lock would be. approved with 50 percent of the construction cost to come from the tax-supported waterway trust fund; with operation costs to remain entirely a federal responsibility; and with the 10-cent increase in the tax spread over 10 years beginning in 1988. Maywood Beulah Jones Cullivan is new rural carrier at Maywood Terrance L. Cullivan is the new rural carrier for the post office. He formerly carried marl at Fulton. Mrs. John Henry, Kim and Kelly of South Dakota are visitingin the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Jones and also Mrs. Ethel Henry in LaGrange. Guests of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fountain, Chris and Katrina were Mr. and Mrs. Roy Davis of Edina Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Krcencke attended the 50th wedding anniversary of his cousin, Virgil and Florence Kroencke Sunday afternoon at the Flamingo in Quincy. Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Shoop, Jason, Jamb, Paula Grieshaum and Ryan attended the Shires reunion held in Ewing Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fountain, Chris and Katrina took supper to Mrs. Junior Fountain in Newark Tuesday. Mrs. Dorothy Bartz was the lucky winner of $200 at the Moose Lodge in Quincy last week. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wallace and family of Florissant, formerly of the Taylor area, visited Mr. and Mrs. Ed Krcencke Saturday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Bringer and Rachel attended the NEMO District 4-H horse show at Kirksville Sunday. Rachel participated in the show and placed in barrel racing, flag racing and pole bending. Thursday evening guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Wiseman were Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Olson of East Lansing, Mich., Sonny Leach of Waverling and Nolan Leach. Mrs. Judy Mason and family of Edina visited Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fountain Thursday evening. Benton Banks, a former resident, now of LaBelle Manor, had surgery in Blessing Hospital in Quincy Monday and is doing well. * Mr. and Mrs,  Olscm of East Lansing, Mich., came Monday to visit her father, Nolan Leach, for the week and on Thursday Sonny Leach of Iowa City came for a visit. Fall classes start Aug. 20 Ona St. Clair. of Ag Kenneth Ford was a Sunday caller of Suggests comparison for centers Mr. and Mrs. Harold Merrel] of Canton. ( Too Late For Last Week) Callers of Mable Walker this week were Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Greek and Andy of Peoria and Mrs. Elaine Greek of Eureka. All were dinner guests of Charlie Nichols of Kahoka. Mable Walker attended a get together at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kindade Of Kahoka in honor of his brother, Christy Paul, and wife, Lucy, of Virginia. Others present were Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Wells, Mr. and Mrs. Lee McWhorter, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Nichols of Kahoka and Mr. and Mrs. Rollo Peters of Canton. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Jr. Cleek of California, Mr. and Mrs. June LeU, Twila Honaker, and Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Kilkinney visited the Ben Minnerly home this week. Donald Waterman ate dinner Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Harlan Edwards. Saturday visitors in the Archie Thrasher home were Mr. and Mrs. Russell Stice and family of Lewtown. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wlnalahagham of Oricley, Calif., spent Sunday in the Archie Thrasher home. Afternoon visitors were Homer T. Kimberley and Lloyd Thrasher. Hazel Lgg ate dinner with Mr. and Mrs. June Logg. Mr. and Mrs. Brad were also guests. Selway remains a patient in HxJpital in Quincy. Hmnilton returned home from Blessing Hospital in Quincy Thursday, Shirley Pryer remains a patient in Blessing Hospital in Quincy. Mable Walker had lunch with Martha Walker Friday. Mrs. Donald Waterman flew to Lyton, Utah, Friday to help Paula Schhtger drive to the Waterman home, where Paula will spend five weeks while Bruce is in Norway. grocery products With the price of groceries today, shoppers need to compare grocery products for the best buy. Patrice Dollar, area family econo- mics and management specialist for Missouri Cooperative Extension, recommends "using unit pricing to compare the price of products." According to Dollar, "Unit pricing allows you to compare the price of a standard unit of measure, for example, ounces, quarts, pounds, or square feet. You simply look for the item with the lowest unit price." Dollar states that "A unit price is usually found on the shelf just below the item and it will list the unit price (price per unit measure, such as ounces or pounds), the product, the retailer code, price of package and weight of package." However, Dollar does point out that "In the state of Missouri, unit pricing is voluntarily offered by some supermarkets as a consumer service." In other states, unit pricing is required by law. Dollar says, "If you shop at a grocery store that offers unit pricing, you can use unit pricing to compare brands and Package sizes to get more for your money. However, do not change from your regular grocery store to another store Just because that store offers unit pricing. There are more factors to consider than unit pricing in the aelection of a grocery store." Dollar also points out that "Unit pricing only helps in price comparison, it offers no information on product quality. One brand may be less expensive than another, but it may also be a poorer quality product. On the other hand, it may be the more expensive brand that is of poorer quality." Dollar states "The larger size of a product is usually the most economical in terms of price, but that product might not be the most economical in view Of the consumer's needs." If a family cannot consume the product before it spoils or if there is not storage space for the product, it is not economical. Dollar says "There are also advantages for the grocery sru in using unit pricing." However, there is some cost involved in using unit pricing. The cost varies from store to store. If a store is using a computer for a variety of store functions, installing unit pricing is at a lower cost. The specialist says "The advantages of using unit pricing could lead to an increase in sales which is what every store owner wants." By using unit pricing the store owner is able to improve inventory and price controls. Unit pricing gives the consumer the feeling that the store owner is concerned about the donsumer and his interests. Unit pricing will also increase the Consumer's confidence in the store. For more information on unit pricing contact the local University Exteimion Center, request guide sheet 303e-unit pricing. The open swine show was held recently at the county fair with Roger Tiemann of LaGrange as superinten- dent and Dick Moore of Canton as the assistant. Premium winners in the show were: 1st, Beth Howard, Wyaconda; 2nd, Mark Lemmon, Williamstown; Srd, Doug Lillard, Williamstown; 4th, Shawn Tiemann, LaGrange; Sth, Michael Lemmon, Williamstown; 8th, Denise Lillard, Williamstown; 7th, Jay Hudnut, Will/amstown; 8th, Richard Hudnut, Will/amstown; 9th, Brenda Schlager, Canton; 10th, Butch Howard, Wyaconda. Fall classes for new and returning students at John Wood Community College' Agriculture and Swine Centers near Perry will start Tuesday, AUg. 20. Part-time as well as full-time students are welcome. Registration and a brief schedule of u-st-day classes will be held Aug. 20, beginning at 8 a.m. Interested persons may walk in that day, with no prior registration or appointment required. Features which contribute to the quality of the program include up-to-date training with an emphasis on "learning by doing", paid internships, a school year that ends early enough for students to help on the family farm or get jobs by mid-April, access to University of Illinois research plots, and reasonable costs for quality education close to home. Follow-up studies of graduates of the college's non-*,,-aner agriculture and swine management programs show a placement record of  percent and better. "In particular, the swine manage- ment program can't meet the demand. We receive four to five times more employer inquiries per year than we have graduates," said Larry Fischer, JWCC director of agriculture pro- grams. The revised clmm w.hedule, adopts! last Year, includes fall and spring quarters of 12 weeks each, with meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays; however, the winter term has been shortened to eight weeks, with classes also meeting Wednesdays. Thus, the school year will end April II. "This will allow students who need to help m the family farm or who have a chance at a summer Job to be |mmmmmmnmmmmm m i ........ ' .... SOUTH 41"14 ST. (IMEHIND Ken iOA) E-- PHONE 2m1-$4411 -- - lXPmmT corns#oN mmPAm .SmlrK)tAU RIPAI'.--- . OVERALL 4 PARTIAL REFINISHING , RUST IPAIR .... INKtRANC! WORK " FOIt SAVIWG $$$ COME .... , " AND $|| ' * Legislators included Dist. Health Unit State Senators and Representatives whose respective districts are included in the 21 counties comprising District 2 Health Unit, Mo. Division of Health were guests at a dinner meeting June 25. The dinner was hosted by the health promoters, an organization of board of trustees, county commission- ers and personnel of county health departments. Dr. Wayne Smith, Winnigan, chair- person of the organization, introduced the guests of honor who spoke briefly on their activities with regard to the passing of bills pertinent to public health. Senator Norman Merrell and Senator Doctorian were among those who sponsored Senate Bill 25 and Sen. MerreU introduced Senate Bills 81 and 114. Representative Harry Hill spon- sored House Bill and expressing Rep. Mark]and Marilyn Petre, State President of Association health to be elected on the than November. The dinner personnel from Health in Health Unity, Public Health sentatives from 14 District 2. Among County attending Mary Garner, Ayers Hamilton, Porter. Grange recommends reserve of 20 According to government statistics there are 79 million acres of highly erndible cropland across the country currently in production. In an effort to remove some of this land from production and prevent further soil erosion, the National Grange has proposed a two-part conservation program. The Grange recommends a 20 million acre reserve where USDA would contract with farmers to take highly erodible land out of production. Farmers would enter into seven to 15 year agreements with USDA on a bid basis based on the value of each acre, and for cost-sharing to convert the land to grassland, forest or other conservation uses. The contracts would remain in force even if the land is sold during the term of the agreement. At present USDA supports convert- ing the land only with no alternative as haying or it would be more increase particips[ encourage farmers for productive The Grange sodbuster highly erndible crop production Should a farmer lands a strong provision would deny of all price or programs. The Grange farm programs reducing soil erosion already highly being cropped. available earlier in the spring," Fischer said. As in the past, students may take all vocational agriculture classes, and all general-education coursework, at the ag and swine center. Students taking classes at the centers may pursue a two-year associate in applied scie-e degree or w shorter-term Certificate, or may choose to enroll in classes simply to improve his or her skills. In addition to the vocational programs, the college also offers a transfer program in agriculture, which prepares students to transfer after two years to a four-year institution and complete work toward a baccalaureate degree. That coursework is offered in Quincy, with classes starting AUg. 27, .and at Culver-Stockton College in Canton, with classes starting Sept. 5. The tuition rate for in-district students (for either program) is a very reasonable $20 per credit hour; out-of- state students are also welcome, at a tuition hour. Financial books and fees, expenses is students. Student in nearby Anyone wanting may call the 217-256-4711, or, if 217-224-6500, ext. A SEOOND fwIr00r old wWI be , I cMdren mn ,an#,#. eh#d old Augu00 .# Fr00/ n, is00omt00, eel 6SS-4416 I # mon00 655-4497 or 655-4126 PEt.S EASY CHILDHOOD I00tplIN# ! lmrea parade... butso Ab.b, parades. I ca'LLe wallets or And crooks make out -<  name* 6= ta* ca.m  N EIGH BORHOOD N EWS Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, August 8, 1985, Williamstown miss minnie Selway Moves fanfil from Sweden to Missouri David Murphy, son of Bill and Patsy Murphy, recently moved his family to Missouri from Sweden. Some of the family and friends who have come to visit them in the Murphy home were Mr. and Mrs. Norval Murphy, Adrain Timmons, Joyce Murphy, Mary Thom- son and Gary, Mr. and Mrs. John Romine and family, Patsy Nelson and Marci, Mr. and Mrs. Grover Murphy, Chet, Frank and Arlen Ewart, Randall Briscoe. The former Murphys are spending a while with his family. Mrs. Robert Hall spent the weekend with her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Randy McCoy of Springfield, Ill. The two grandsons returned home after a visit with their grandparents, Mr. and Hall. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Moore of Brashear spent a part of last week with Mrs. Erma Marsot and Margie. Two new ceiling fans have been installed in the Methodist Church. A ball game was played here Sunday with proceeds going to the fire department. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Selway and Dewayne visited Minnie Selway Tues- day, who was a patient in Blessing Hospital, Quincy. Rev Ted Davis was also a caller. Mrs. Joe Fryer is a patient in Blessing Hospital, Quincy. Mrs. Gertrude Bash was moved last week from Blessing Hospital to the Keokuk hospital. Mrs. Velma Doran and son, Bobby and family visited her Wednesday. The Daughtry sisters from Waco, Ia., spent last week with their grand- parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Tucker. Mr. and Mrs. Willie Brown and Mrs. Ella Minnerly of Colorado are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ben Minnerly. Mrs. Cathy Legg and children of Ewing were Wednesday guests of the June Legg family. Mrs. Rachel, .Brown and daughter, Jody Timmons Of Colorado, spent last week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Mumma. Mary Maxey was a Friday evening visitor in the Erma Marsot home. Dewayne Selway spent the weekend with his sister, Mr. and Mrs. John Roe of Brookfield. Chester St. Clair and Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Kerr of Luray were Sunday visitors of the former's mother, Mrs. Golden winner Judges selecting a winner - The "Colorado Gold", a 1933 Ford rod displayed by Jimmie Davolt of Macon, won the first place trophy in both the rod class and the interior class at the recent Lewis County Fair car show. The pickup, with glass floors throughout, was purchased by the Davolts last year from an elderly exhibitor in Colorado for a bargain price of $7,200. A western motif mural appears on the outside of each door. Davolts said that this gold colored vehicle has won many awards and has been exhibited in various shows in every section of the country, including the National Car Show. Second locks at Alton nearer to reality U.S. Senator Jack Danforth (R-Mo.) announced recently that the second chamber at Locks and Dam 26 is in position to reach the President's desk before Congress adjourns for August recess. Danforth said approval of construc- tion of the $220 million project came in Senate-House negotiations on the pending supplemental appropriations bill for fiscal year 1985. Danforth has been a long-time supporter of the second lock. The terms of the approval were worked out by Danforth 'in negotiations with the Administration. "The Midwest has.,waited a long time for this critically needed project," Danforth said. "Authoriza- tion is in sight at last on terms acceptable to our region, to the grain trade and to the barge industry." Locks and Dam 26 at Alton, Ill., is a major gateway for Mississippi River commerce. The existing facility.- more than 40 years old, is a major bottleneck for barge traffic. Congress authorized replacement of the existing dam and 1,200-foot lock in 1978. The new lock and dam is set to begin operation in 1988, with work on the existing job completed in 1990 at a cost of $757 million. Completion of the second lock, if authorized this year, could come by 1991 at a cost of $220 million. Up to this point, approval of the second lock had been held hostage by the Administration over the amount of money the industry would contribute through the tax on diesel fuel used by barges. The Administration had insisted that the tax finance the full cost of construction and 70 percent of the operating costs of the locks and dam. In order to support these costs, the Administration sought a doubling in the tax on barge fuel, now set to rise to I0 cents per gallon in October. Under an agreement involving Administration Danforth, the and the Senate leadership, the second lock would be. approved with 50 percent of the construction cost to come from the tax-supported waterway trust fund; with operation costs to remain entirely a federal responsibility; and with the 10-cent increase in the tax spread over 10 years beginning in 1988. Maywood Beulah Jones Cullivan is new rural carrier at Maywood Terrance L. Cullivan is the new rural carrier for the post office. He formerly carried marl at Fulton. Mrs. John Henry, Kim and Kelly of South Dakota are visitingin the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Jones and also Mrs. Ethel Henry in LaGrange. Guests of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fountain, Chris and Katrina were Mr. and Mrs. Roy Davis of Edina Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Krcencke attended the 50th wedding anniversary of his cousin, Virgil and Florence Kroencke Sunday afternoon at the Flamingo in Quincy. Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Shoop, Jason, Jamb, Paula Grieshaum and Ryan attended the Shires reunion held in Ewing Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fountain, Chris and Katrina took supper to Mrs. Junior Fountain in Newark Tuesday. Mrs. Dorothy Bartz was the lucky winner of $200 at the Moose Lodge in Quincy last week. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wallace and family of Florissant, formerly of the Taylor area, visited Mr. and Mrs. Ed Krcencke Saturday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Bringer and Rachel attended the NEMO District 4-H horse show at Kirksville Sunday. Rachel participated in the show and placed in barrel racing, flag racing and pole bending. Thursday evening guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Wiseman were Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Olson of East Lansing, Mich., Sonny Leach of Waverling and Nolan Leach. Mrs. Judy Mason and family of Edina visited Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fountain Thursday evening. Benton Banks, a former resident, now of LaBelle Manor, had surgery in Blessing Hospital in Quincy Monday and is doing well. * Mr. and Mrs,  Olscm of East Lansing, Mich., came Monday to visit her father, Nolan Leach, for the week and on Thursday Sonny Leach of Iowa City came for a visit. Fall classes start Aug. 20 Ona St. Clair. of Ag Kenneth Ford was a Sunday caller of Suggests comparison for centers Mr. and Mrs. Harold Merrel] of Canton. ( Too Late For Last Week) Callers of Mable Walker this week were Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Greek and Andy of Peoria and Mrs. Elaine Greek of Eureka. All were dinner guests of Charlie Nichols of Kahoka. Mable Walker attended a get together at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kindade Of Kahoka in honor of his brother, Christy Paul, and wife, Lucy, of Virginia. Others present were Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Wells, Mr. and Mrs. Lee McWhorter, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Nichols of Kahoka and Mr. and Mrs. Rollo Peters of Canton. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Jr. Cleek of California, Mr. and Mrs. June LeU, Twila Honaker, and Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Kilkinney visited the Ben Minnerly home this week. Donald Waterman ate dinner Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Harlan Edwards. Saturday visitors in the Archie Thrasher home were Mr. and Mrs. Russell Stice and family of Lewtown. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wlnalahagham of Oricley, Calif., spent Sunday in the Archie Thrasher home. Afternoon visitors were Homer T. Kimberley and Lloyd Thrasher. Hazel Lgg ate dinner with Mr. and Mrs. June Logg. Mr. and Mrs. Brad were also guests. Selway remains a patient in HxJpital in Quincy. Hmnilton returned home from Blessing Hospital in Quincy Thursday, Shirley Pryer remains a patient in Blessing Hospital in Quincy. Mable Walker had lunch with Martha Walker Friday. Mrs. Donald Waterman flew to Lyton, Utah, Friday to help Paula Schhtger drive to the Waterman home, where Paula will spend five weeks while Bruce is in Norway. grocery products With the price of groceries today, shoppers need to compare grocery products for the best buy. Patrice Dollar, area family econo- mics and management specialist for Missouri Cooperative Extension, recommends "using unit pricing to compare the price of products." According to Dollar, "Unit pricing allows you to compare the price of a standard unit of measure, for example, ounces, quarts, pounds, or square feet. You simply look for the item with the lowest unit price." Dollar states that "A unit price is usually found on the shelf just below the item and it will list the unit price (price per unit measure, such as ounces or pounds), the product, the retailer code, price of package and weight of package." However, Dollar does point out that "In the state of Missouri, unit pricing is voluntarily offered by some supermarkets as a consumer service." In other states, unit pricing is required by law. Dollar says, "If you shop at a grocery store that offers unit pricing, you can use unit pricing to compare brands and Package sizes to get more for your money. However, do not change from your regular grocery store to another store Just because that store offers unit pricing. There are more factors to consider than unit pricing in the aelection of a grocery store." Dollar also points out that "Unit pricing only helps in price comparison, it offers no information on product quality. One brand may be less expensive than another, but it may also be a poorer quality product. On the other hand, it may be the more expensive brand that is of poorer quality." Dollar states "The larger size of a product is usually the most economical in terms of price, but that product might not be the most economical in view Of the consumer's needs." If a family cannot consume the product before it spoils or if there is not storage space for the product, it is not economical. Dollar says "There are also advantages for the grocery sru in using unit pricing." However, there is some cost involved in using unit pricing. The cost varies from store to store. If a store is using a computer for a variety of store functions, installing unit pricing is at a lower cost. The specialist says "The advantages of using unit pricing could lead to an increase in sales which is what every store owner wants." By using unit pricing the store owner is able to improve inventory and price controls. Unit pricing gives the consumer the feeling that the store owner is concerned about the donsumer and his interests. Unit pricing will also increase the Consumer's confidence in the store. For more information on unit pricing contact the local University Exteimion Center, request guide sheet 303e-unit pricing. The open swine show was held recently at the county fair with Roger Tiemann of LaGrange as superinten- dent and Dick Moore of Canton as the assistant. Premium winners in the show were: 1st, Beth Howard, Wyaconda; 2nd, Mark Lemmon, Williamstown; Srd, Doug Lillard, Williamstown; 4th, Shawn Tiemann, LaGrange; Sth, Michael Lemmon, Williamstown; 8th, Denise Lillard, Williamstown; 7th, Jay Hudnut, Will/amstown; 8th, Richard Hudnut, Will/amstown; 9th, Brenda Schlager, Canton; 10th, Butch Howard, Wyaconda. Fall classes for new and returning students at John Wood Community College' Agriculture and Swine Centers near Perry will start Tuesday, AUg. 20. Part-time as well as full-time students are welcome. Registration and a brief schedule of u-st-day classes will be held Aug. 20, beginning at 8 a.m. Interested persons may walk in that day, with no prior registration or appointment required. Features which contribute to the quality of the program include up-to-date training with an emphasis on "learning by doing", paid internships, a school year that ends early enough for students to help on the family farm or get jobs by mid-April, access to University of Illinois research plots, and reasonable costs for quality education close to home. Follow-up studies of graduates of the college's non-*,,-aner agriculture and swine management programs show a placement record of  percent and better. "In particular, the swine manage- ment program can't meet the demand. We receive four to five times more employer inquiries per year than we have graduates," said Larry Fischer, JWCC director of agriculture pro- grams. The revised clmm w.hedule, adopts! last Year, includes fall and spring quarters of 12 weeks each, with meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays; however, the winter term has been shortened to eight weeks, with classes also meeting Wednesdays. Thus, the school year will end April II. "This will allow students who need to help m the family farm or who have a chance at a summer Job to be |mmmmmmnmmmmm m i ........ ' .... SOUTH 41"14 ST. (IMEHIND Ken iOA) E-- PHONE 2m1-$4411 -- - lXPmmT corns#oN mmPAm .SmlrK)tAU RIPAI'.--- . OVERALL 4 PARTIAL REFINISHING , RUST IPAIR .... INKtRANC! WORK " FOIt SAVIWG $$$ COME .... , " AND $|| ' * Legislators included Dist. Health Unit State Senators and Representatives whose respective districts are included in the 21 counties comprising District 2 Health Unit, Mo. Division of Health were guests at a dinner meeting June 25. The dinner was hosted by the health promoters, an organization of board of trustees, county commission- ers and personnel of county health departments. Dr. Wayne Smith, Winnigan, chair- person of the organization, introduced the guests of honor who spoke briefly on their activities with regard to the passing of bills pertinent to public health. Senator Norman Merrell and Senator Doctorian were among those who sponsored Senate Bill 25 and Sen. MerreU introduced Senate Bills 81 and 114. Representative Harry Hill spon- sored House Bill and expressing Rep. Mark]and Marilyn Petre, State President of Association health to be elected on the than November. The dinner personnel from Health in Health Unity, Public Health sentatives from 14 District 2. Among County attending Mary Garner, Ayers Hamilton, Porter. Grange recommends reserve of 20 According to government statistics there are 79 million acres of highly erndible cropland across the country currently in production. In an effort to remove some of this land from production and prevent further soil erosion, the National Grange has proposed a two-part conservation program. The Grange recommends a 20 million acre reserve where USDA would contract with farmers to take highly erodible land out of production. Farmers would enter into seven to 15 year agreements with USDA on a bid basis based on the value of each acre, and for cost-sharing to convert the land to grassland, forest or other conservation uses. The contracts would remain in force even if the land is sold during the term of the agreement. At present USDA supports convert- ing the land only with no alternative as haying or it would be more increase particips[ encourage farmers for productive The Grange sodbuster highly erndible crop production Should a farmer lands a strong provision would deny of all price or programs. The Grange farm programs reducing soil erosion already highly being cropped. available earlier in the spring," Fischer said. As in the past, students may take all vocational agriculture classes, and all general-education coursework, at the ag and swine center. Students taking classes at the centers may pursue a two-year associate in applied scie-e degree or w shorter-term Certificate, or may choose to enroll in classes simply to improve his or her skills. In addition to the vocational programs, the college also offers a transfer program in agriculture, which prepares students to transfer after two years to a four-year institution and complete work toward a baccalaureate degree. That coursework is offered in Quincy, with classes starting AUg. 27, .and at Culver-Stockton College in Canton, with classes starting Sept. 5. The tuition rate for in-district students (for either program) is a very reasonable $20 per credit hour; out-of- state students are also welcome, at a tuition hour. Financial books and fees, expenses is students. Student in nearby Anyone wanting may call the 217-256-4711, or, if 217-224-6500, ext. A SEOOND fwIr00r old wWI be , I cMdren mn ,an#,#. eh#d old Augu00 .# Fr00/ n, is00omt00, eel 6SS-4416 I # mon00 655-4497 or 655-4126 PEt.S EASY CHILDHOOD I00tplIN# ! lmrea parade... butso Ab.b, parades. I ca'LLe wallets or And crooks make out -<  name* 6= ta* ca.m