"
Newspaper Archive of
Press-News Journal
Canton, Missouri
Lyft
August 15, 1985     Press-News Journal
PAGE 9     (9 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 9     (9 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
August 15, 1985
 

Newspaper Archive of Press-News Journal produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




TORIAL 8, OPINION Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo,, Thursday, August 15, 1985, Page lb wisdom - from many sources Down Children. It's pot- " that wonderful time the extreme corners tml use the wit and collecting there it is borrowed, rarely originaL Still, lind statements that to simply drop into Here are some up essential liberty temporary safety nor safety. To attain the unobtainable is God's work. To try is yours. He who knows not and knows he knows not, knows a lot. He who knows not and knows not he knows not, knows not! It is said that at the time of Columbus there was a law which forbade mariners eating garlic for fear of affecting the compass and throwing the ship off conrse. Each American uses, directly or indirectly, about 26 million gallons of water during his lifetime. We can look forward to the perfect autumn day -- the day when the lawn no longer needs mowing and the leaves haven't yet started to fall. Tension is driving with the brakes oil. Sign in optometrist's window: "Eyes examined while you wait." A family man is the fellow who has replaced the currency in his wallet with snapshots. When yoe kill a little time yon may be murdering opportunity. A clear conscience may be nothing more than a poor memory. A sense of humor is what makes you laugh at something which would make you mad if it happened to yon. Because you have occasional low spells of despondence, don't despair. The sun has a sinking spell every night, but it rises again all right the next moring. --Henry Van Dyke. There is something that is much more scarce, something finer far, something rarer than ability. It is the ability to recognize ability. --Elbert Hubbard. is in Union ranks fifth in tion over the you're according to Aging, over in the "senior pass the quality of who have home residents who don't receive any Medicaid assistance a little extra pocket money for personal needs. Up to $25 a month may be allotted for this purpose. The amount is not excessive, but it will give senior citizens a little added income to purchase things they otherwise could not afford. Another new proposal provides a $1 million increase in state funds for in-home services, bringing the total for fiscal year 1985-86 to $8,351,119. The money will help senior citizens maintain their independence but still receive some help from the state to take care of basic needs. Last but not least is the approval of a new law creating a special state council to coordinate transportation services for elderly and handicapped persons. The 13-member group (made up of legislators, health officials and five persons appointed by the Gover- nor to represent the interests of the elderly and handicapped) has been asked to take a careful look at what services are now available and make recommendations for improvement. All of these new laws will go a long to making way to help senior citizens lead Prdductivestate. productive, independent lives. I am approved this "- i ..... + very happy to have played a part in ur Cl ....... . insuring their final passage. grealt to offset - . (You might also be interested to MissomTs know that MisSouri has been chosen to With fl"+ host the first National Senior Olympic  itizens will g/50 instead of set by law. The way in helping to pay more of statewide I handled in the to give nursing Games in 1987. Men and women will compete separately in age divisions for each event, including track and field, bicycling, bowling, golf, swimming, tennis, table tennis, horseshoes and others. It is estimated" that about 4,000 participants from the United States and Canada will compete in the special event. ) land that per acre has one- Will return; they the purchase even those can bang on based on the in land values the last 200 .ke 00orge Jefferson the per acre .up, up, nninterrupt- of peak devalua- prices; after each gone to even. Ky., in me fall of 1835. He did not expect to find land prices as high as they were. He wanted to buy a quarter section (160 acres) but bad to go into a partnership with another settler to swing the deal. It was a year before Gramps could become the owner in fee simple. The price he paid -- $1.25 per acre, quickly went to $1.75, then to $3, to $5 and on up. Between 1836 and the year he died, 1865, John Lawless purchased several additional S0-acre tracts. He paid successively, $500; $600; $2,000, $2,500 and $4,000. From about 1880 until World War I, land prices remained rather stable. They rse during the war and declined Keeping in touch. . Senator Jack Danforth Let's hope that too little is not too late Congress has patched together a moved to compromise budget. The compromise erected a affers some progress against large wooden p[0 w deficits in the federal budget, but it's beneath the not enough. It falls far short of the was softened targets we set for reducing the large and their - deficits. with the When Congress began the battle of the budget, we said we would put ourselves on the path to a balanced budget by 1990. We are not on that path. Even at face value, the comprondse plan would accept per- manent deficits of about $140 billion a year, something we simply cannot afford. The path to a balanced budget would require a target similar to the Senate's first proposal of nearly $300 billion in Pioneer land savings over the next three years. The My final compromise claims $280 billion in Lawless, savings over three years, but "a big into slice of the pie is juggled numbers and County, money. about 1820. land and be squatters settle in and begin always be with a and the to move on Mailbox Letters From Our Readers Dear Editor: I am sending you a check to pay for my renewal to the "Press-News Journal" for another year. Although I've been gone from Lewis County for nearly 27 years, I remain a faithful reader of your paper, read it from cover to cover. I enjoy the "Backward Glances," "Yesteryear Pictures" and Keith Wilkey's articles. My family and ancestors were long time residents of Lewistown and vicinity, the Burnett family, to see by-gone news of the family. Look forward each week to my paper. Dyas Burnett Hart (Mrs. Evan C. Hart) To Whom It May Concern: Hark, hark, from the park-- The businesses are closed on Main Street. The fellowship (how the dogs do bark), Is great wherever friends meet. Dark, dark, 'cept lights of cars, Carrying night time drivers; So happy, so free (does the clock say three?), Are those early or late arrivers? "Dear Lord," the preacher prays, "Let babies and elders sleep, And from the dangers of ditch and law, I ask that you mercifully keep." And the preacher waits -- the bell will peal, As the lively pass by the church. Oh, that then, they would come at ten, To hear preacher in the pulpit perch! Pastor Eloise, Lewistown shortly thereafter. There was little change until the Depression. They rose from the lows of the early 1930s and again were stable until World War II. From then until the first election of President Nixon they followed a stead, slightly upward, trend. We all know what happened in the 70s. We all know what is happening in the 80s. The long term trend  more people and less prime land, is continuing as far as the eye can reach. The only result can ultimately be another rise in land values. But not the wisest knows when. A more realistic and honest estimate is $200 billion in savings between now and 1988 -- IF we keep all the promises we've made and IF the economic assumptions work out. In the Senate plan, we built in tools to enforce savings in all three years of the plan. In the compromise, we gave up a great deal of the enforcement tools that would force us to keep our promises. I voted for the compromise for one reason: something is usually better than nothing. The deficit is a time bomb. It is better to have a budget resolution, even one short of the mark, than to have no budget at all. But the truth is that we have let the country down. We have let down farmers, small businesses, and con- struction workers. We have failed people who depend on exports for their livelihoods. We have failed those Americans who fear loss of their jobs to imports. Until we take strong action against deficits, the dollar will remain overvalued -- a condition that amounts to a tax on exports and a subsidy for imports. The problem of deficits will not go away. Congress will be back to this problem next year. When we return to the difficult choices required to put us on the road to a balanced budget, the decisions will be just as tough, and time will have been wasted. We know the budget compromise is too little. We lost the battle this year. For the sake of our nation's economy and our childrenj I hope it will not be too late to win twar next year. ! YESTERYEAR'S PICTURES The photo is to dim to identify the handsome excursion boat, photograph- ed by Pearl Plank of Canton, about 1915, and taken from her scrapbook. The three-decker side-wheeler may have been the Capitol, or any number of the great steamers that traveled the Mississippi regularly at the early part of this century. A note with the photo indicates it was taken from the deck of the Steamer Keokuk. Backward Glances Pearl Plank 26 YEAR8 AGO TIM CImtoa PresNews At 19, lJ5 In a very light vote on the three Clstitutional Amendments, Tuesday, Missouri passed No. 1, which allows the Governor to succeed himself, Aiaendment No. 2, which allows cities to Jell industrial plants, also passed, bet Amendment No. 3, which reappor- the Missouri House of Represen- tivss, failed to pass. F.u'l Leroy Hart, 32, died Saturday, as a result of an automobile " on U.S. Highway 61 about g miles north of Canton. Mr. Hart was employed by Car's Cartage of Iowa City. An innovation in the Scouting program in Canton will take place in the form of a "Camp Out" in the City Park across from the post office in downtown Canton Aug. 27, 28 and 29. Richard Pulse, Explorer advisor, George Calvert, assistant Scoutmaster, and Bill Dorris, Scoutmaster of Troop 174, will sponsor the campout program and camp with the Scouts. Mimfie Louise Gleeser Hoffman, 80, died Saturday, Aug. 14, in the Good Samaritan Home in Quincy, where she had made her home for the last two years. 1"he Lewis County Journal August 19, 1965 Harry Clay (Bunt) Jenkins, 77, died August 13, in Blessing Hospital in Quincy. He was a farmer and had spent his entire life in the Monticello community. Survivors include his wife and three children, Linton Jenkins, Mrs. Ross Ray and Mrs. Donald Humphrey, all of Monticello. Mrs. Louise Fishback, 79, died August II at Prairie View Rest Home where she had lived for more than three years. Mrs. Russell Garkie, 68, of Durham died Tuesday in St. Elizabeth Hospital, Hannibal. She bad lived all her life in Lewis and Marion counties and was a member of the Hester Baptist Church Funeral services for Mrs. W. A. Mussetter, 92, were held at the LaGrange Christian Church Aug. 15. Mrs. Mussetter died Aug. 12 in the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mary Ray of Crowell, Tex. She was a member of the first graduating class of the Pleasant Grove school in 1889. Miss Amanda Sturhan. 73. died in you wnnt PNJ I clasdfieds * Blessing Hospital in Quincy Aug. 14. She was educated in the LaGrange public schools and LaGrange College. She taught school in Lewis and Clark counties many years but was retired. Mr. and Mrs. Solon Silvey of Lewistown celebrated their 50th wed- ding anniversary with a family dinner at Stipps Restaurant in Quincy Aug. 15. Mr. Silvey was the depot agent at Lewistown until his retirement. Miss Donna Crouch, daughter of Sheriff and Mrs. Pearl Hicks, has accepted a position in Jacksonville, having been employed by the Illinois Children and Family Association. 5O YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News August 22, 1935 E. Z. Thompson, 80, an old and respected citizen of the community, died Sunday. The contract for building the power and lighting transformers for Lock and Dam No. 20 was awarded to the Pennsylvania Transformer Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa., and shipment of the order is expected to be made this week. These transformers were de- signed by Homer H. Wagner who is the chief electrical designing engineer of the Company. Mr. Wagner is the son of W. C. Wagner, contractor and builder of Canton, and is well-known to all Canton residents, being a graduate of Canton High School and of Culver- Stockton College; also graduated in electrical engineering at both the University of Illinois and the Univers- ity of Pittsburgh. The transformers for Lock and Dam No. 20 are the "subway type" of design, which means that they may be operated while completely submerged in water if necessary. The Pennsyl- vania Transformer Co. recently built the largest air blast welding trans- former in the world, which delivers 200,000 amperes for welding seams in the manufacture of steel pipe in sizes as large as 18 inches in diameter. They are now designing a larger unit which will deliver almost /2 million amperes. Culver-Stockton College will open its doors a week earlier than usual this year with freshman days starting on Sept. 7. The new department in business administration and commerce is attracting considerable attention and Joe Hootman of Cantril, la., has been secured as an instructor in that department. Work on the Canton-Meyer nine foot channel dam is nearing its completion. In less than a month this gigantic steel and concrete barrier across the Mms" issippi will be formally turned over to the United State Government. Methodist of Canton in 100th anniversary. County churches will join in omtennial celebration - week of services- meetings will be held each evening Aug. 25 to Sept. I. In the fall of 1831, ev. W. A. H. Spratt, a local preacher, organized the first Methodist Church in Lewis County. Although Canton was the first town in the county and the Methodists had their first class in Canton, the oldest Methodist Church building in the county was Mount Moriah, seven miles northwest of Cantou. The first preacher appointed to the Canton circuit was Rev. James W. Jamieson. The Canton circuit included all of the country north of the Fabius River to and up the Des Moines as far as the present site of the City of Des Moines. It was bounded On the east by the Mississippi River and on the west by vast prairies and extensive forests. 6O YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August Zl, 1925 is visited an epidemic of typhoid fever..Up to Wednesday evening 25 cases had been reported to County Health Physician and it is thought there were several more cases not reported. Three people have died this week as a result of the epidemic. The first one to be called was J. A. Quinn, 70, a prominent life-long resident of the county. Up to 15 years ago he bad been actively engaged in farming and stock raising. At one time Mr Quinn owned the largest tract of land in Lewis County. His farm was located between Maywood and LaGranga The next one to go was Henton Briscoe who .died Monday and the third was Mrs. Walter Reed, who died Tuesday. Mr. Briscoe was engaged in the trucking business in LaGrange. Mrs. Reed was the wife of Walter Reed, who runs the LaGrange filling station. W. A. Smith is handling i pickles at this place for the Canton Ca Factory, and has been receiving a Up to Tuesday he had received nearly 600 bushels, and on Monday got in over 100 bushels. The Ewing High School will open Sept. 7 with new equipment through- out. The new seats are being installed; the greater number of the library books are on hand and the laboratory equipment has been ordered. The new building will not be completed before the first of the year. The housing facilities will be similar to the housing" after the fire last year. The basement of the Queen of Peace Church will be used for the study hall of the junior-senior high school and the city hall for the first six grades, supplemented probably by a private dwelling. 70 YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August 20, 1915 The records in the office of the Secretary of State show that 'on Aug. 1 there were 68,815 registered motor vehicles in Missouri. Last year the registration was a little more than 54,000. Prosecuting Attorney L. B. Hender- son, Prof. J. J. Toice, Joe Moore, Homer Wallace and G. B. Wooldridge attended the auto races at Quincy Sunday. A large crowd was in attendance, many from this county. The races were said to be good, the best speed being a mile a minute. Hon. B. H. Smith of Canton is prominently mentioned as a candidate for Congress in the First District. St. Louis Republican Drs. Knight and Marchand have gone to LaBelle where they have quite a number of patients for their therapeutic bath. They advertise to remain there I0 days. Died: two miles south of Aug. 18 of cholera infantum, the little son of months I0 days. The graveyard at this place where many of our friends and relatives are laid at rest, is in a bad condition, being over-grown with sprouts, briers, wild grass and weeds, and the ground is covered with litter so that it is not only an eyesore to the passerby but subjects those who go there to attend the interment of a friend or relative, or to visit their graves, to annoyance, inconvenience and trouble. This should not be. A committee will call upon our citizens and an opportunity given for them to contribute of their means for the purpose of improving the grave- yard and removing the evil complain- ed 6f C. R. MaGee, W. G. Allen, W. G. Watson and the Journal are authorized to receive TORIAL 8, OPINION Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo,, Thursday, August 15, 1985, Page lb wisdom - from many sources Down Children. It's pot- " that wonderful time the extreme corners tml use the wit and collecting there it is borrowed, rarely originaL Still, lind statements that to simply drop into Here are some up essential liberty temporary safety nor safety. To attain the unobtainable is God's work. To try is yours. He who knows not and knows he knows not, knows a lot. He who knows not and knows not he knows not, knows not! It is said that at the time of Columbus there was a law which forbade mariners eating garlic for fear of affecting the compass and throwing the ship off conrse. Each American uses, directly or indirectly, about 26 million gallons of water during his lifetime. We can look forward to the perfect autumn day -- the day when the lawn no longer needs mowing and the leaves haven't yet started to fall. Tension is driving with the brakes oil. Sign in optometrist's window: "Eyes examined while you wait." A family man is the fellow who has replaced the currency in his wallet with snapshots. When yoe kill a little time yon may be murdering opportunity. A clear conscience may be nothing more than a poor memory. A sense of humor is what makes you laugh at something which would make you mad if it happened to yon. Because you have occasional low spells of despondence, don't despair. The sun has a sinking spell every night, but it rises again all right the next moring. --Henry Van Dyke. There is something that is much more scarce, something finer far, something rarer than ability. It is the ability to recognize ability. --Elbert Hubbard. is in Union ranks fifth in tion over the you're according to Aging, over in the "senior pass the quality of who have home residents who don't receive any Medicaid assistance a little extra pocket money for personal needs. Up to $25 a month may be allotted for this purpose. The amount is not excessive, but it will give senior citizens a little added income to purchase things they otherwise could not afford. Another new proposal provides a $1 million increase in state funds for in-home services, bringing the total for fiscal year 1985-86 to $8,351,119. The money will help senior citizens maintain their independence but still receive some help from the state to take care of basic needs. Last but not least is the approval of a new law creating a special state council to coordinate transportation services for elderly and handicapped persons. The 13-member group (made up of legislators, health officials and five persons appointed by the Gover- nor to represent the interests of the elderly and handicapped) has been asked to take a careful look at what services are now available and make recommendations for improvement. All of these new laws will go a long to making way to help senior citizens lead Prdductivestate. productive, independent lives. I am approved this "- i ..... + very happy to have played a part in ur Cl ....... . insuring their final passage. grealt to offset - . (You might also be interested to MissomTs know that MisSouri has been chosen to With fl"+ host the first National Senior Olympic  itizens will g/50 instead of set by law. The way in helping to pay more of statewide I handled in the to give nursing Games in 1987. Men and women will compete separately in age divisions for each event, including track and field, bicycling, bowling, golf, swimming, tennis, table tennis, horseshoes and others. It is estimated" that about 4,000 participants from the United States and Canada will compete in the special event. ) land that per acre has one- Will return; they the purchase even those can bang on based on the in land values the last 200 .ke 00orge Jefferson the per acre .up, up, nninterrupt- of peak devalua- prices; after each gone to even. Ky., in me fall of 1835. He did not expect to find land prices as high as they were. He wanted to buy a quarter section (160 acres) but bad to go into a partnership with another settler to swing the deal. It was a year before Gramps could become the owner in fee simple. The price he paid -- $1.25 per acre, quickly went to $1.75, then to $3, to $5 and on up. Between 1836 and the year he died, 1865, John Lawless purchased several additional S0-acre tracts. He paid successively, $500; $600; $2,000, $2,500 and $4,000. From about 1880 until World War I, land prices remained rather stable. They rse during the war and declined Keeping in touch. . Senator Jack Danforth Let's hope that too little is not too late Congress has patched together a moved to compromise budget. The compromise erected a affers some progress against large wooden p[0 w deficits in the federal budget, but it's beneath the not enough. It falls far short of the was softened targets we set for reducing the large and their - deficits. with the When Congress began the battle of the budget, we said we would put ourselves on the path to a balanced budget by 1990. We are not on that path. Even at face value, the comprondse plan would accept per- manent deficits of about $140 billion a year, something we simply cannot afford. The path to a balanced budget would require a target similar to the Senate's first proposal of nearly $300 billion in Pioneer land savings over the next three years. The My final compromise claims $280 billion in Lawless, savings over three years, but "a big into slice of the pie is juggled numbers and County, money. about 1820. land and be squatters settle in and begin always be with a and the to move on Mailbox Letters From Our Readers Dear Editor: I am sending you a check to pay for my renewal to the "Press-News Journal" for another year. Although I've been gone from Lewis County for nearly 27 years, I remain a faithful reader of your paper, read it from cover to cover. I enjoy the "Backward Glances," "Yesteryear Pictures" and Keith Wilkey's articles. My family and ancestors were long time residents of Lewistown and vicinity, the Burnett family, to see by-gone news of the family. Look forward each week to my paper. Dyas Burnett Hart (Mrs. Evan C. Hart) To Whom It May Concern: Hark, hark, from the park-- The businesses are closed on Main Street. The fellowship (how the dogs do bark), Is great wherever friends meet. Dark, dark, 'cept lights of cars, Carrying night time drivers; So happy, so free (does the clock say three?), Are those early or late arrivers? "Dear Lord," the preacher prays, "Let babies and elders sleep, And from the dangers of ditch and law, I ask that you mercifully keep." And the preacher waits -- the bell will peal, As the lively pass by the church. Oh, that then, they would come at ten, To hear preacher in the pulpit perch! Pastor Eloise, Lewistown shortly thereafter. There was little change until the Depression. They rose from the lows of the early 1930s and again were stable until World War II. From then until the first election of President Nixon they followed a stead, slightly upward, trend. We all know what happened in the 70s. We all know what is happening in the 80s. The long term trend  more people and less prime land, is continuing as far as the eye can reach. The only result can ultimately be another rise in land values. But not the wisest knows when. A more realistic and honest estimate is $200 billion in savings between now and 1988 -- IF we keep all the promises we've made and IF the economic assumptions work out. In the Senate plan, we built in tools to enforce savings in all three years of the plan. In the compromise, we gave up a great deal of the enforcement tools that would force us to keep our promises. I voted for the compromise for one reason: something is usually better than nothing. The deficit is a time bomb. It is better to have a budget resolution, even one short of the mark, than to have no budget at all. But the truth is that we have let the country down. We have let down farmers, small businesses, and con- struction workers. We have failed people who depend on exports for their livelihoods. We have failed those Americans who fear loss of their jobs to imports. Until we take strong action against deficits, the dollar will remain overvalued -- a condition that amounts to a tax on exports and a subsidy for imports. The problem of deficits will not go away. Congress will be back to this problem next year. When we return to the difficult choices required to put us on the road to a balanced budget, the decisions will be just as tough, and time will have been wasted. We know the budget compromise is too little. We lost the battle this year. For the sake of our nation's economy and our childrenj I hope it will not be too late to win twar next year. ! YESTERYEAR'S PICTURES The photo is to dim to identify the handsome excursion boat, photograph- ed by Pearl Plank of Canton, about 1915, and taken from her scrapbook. The three-decker side-wheeler may have been the Capitol, or any number of the great steamers that traveled the Mississippi regularly at the early part of this century. A note with the photo indicates it was taken from the deck of the Steamer Keokuk. Backward Glances Pearl Plank 26 YEAR8 AGO TIM CImtoa PresNews At 19, lJ5 In a very light vote on the three Clstitutional Amendments, Tuesday, Missouri passed No. 1, which allows the Governor to succeed himself, Aiaendment No. 2, which allows cities to Jell industrial plants, also passed, bet Amendment No. 3, which reappor- the Missouri House of Represen- tivss, failed to pass. F.u'l Leroy Hart, 32, died Saturday, as a result of an automobile " on U.S. Highway 61 about g miles north of Canton. Mr. Hart was employed by Car's Cartage of Iowa City. An innovation in the Scouting program in Canton will take place in the form of a "Camp Out" in the City Park across from the post office in downtown Canton Aug. 27, 28 and 29. Richard Pulse, Explorer advisor, George Calvert, assistant Scoutmaster, and Bill Dorris, Scoutmaster of Troop 174, will sponsor the campout program and camp with the Scouts. Mimfie Louise Gleeser Hoffman, 80, died Saturday, Aug. 14, in the Good Samaritan Home in Quincy, where she had made her home for the last two years. 1"he Lewis County Journal August 19, 1965 Harry Clay (Bunt) Jenkins, 77, died August 13, in Blessing Hospital in Quincy. He was a farmer and had spent his entire life in the Monticello community. Survivors include his wife and three children, Linton Jenkins, Mrs. Ross Ray and Mrs. Donald Humphrey, all of Monticello. Mrs. Louise Fishback, 79, died August II at Prairie View Rest Home where she had lived for more than three years. Mrs. Russell Garkie, 68, of Durham died Tuesday in St. Elizabeth Hospital, Hannibal. She bad lived all her life in Lewis and Marion counties and was a member of the Hester Baptist Church Funeral services for Mrs. W. A. Mussetter, 92, were held at the LaGrange Christian Church Aug. 15. Mrs. Mussetter died Aug. 12 in the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mary Ray of Crowell, Tex. She was a member of the first graduating class of the Pleasant Grove school in 1889. Miss Amanda Sturhan. 73. died in you wnnt PNJ I clasdfieds * Blessing Hospital in Quincy Aug. 14. She was educated in the LaGrange public schools and LaGrange College. She taught school in Lewis and Clark counties many years but was retired. Mr. and Mrs. Solon Silvey of Lewistown celebrated their 50th wed- ding anniversary with a family dinner at Stipps Restaurant in Quincy Aug. 15. Mr. Silvey was the depot agent at Lewistown until his retirement. Miss Donna Crouch, daughter of Sheriff and Mrs. Pearl Hicks, has accepted a position in Jacksonville, having been employed by the Illinois Children and Family Association. 5O YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News August 22, 1935 E. Z. Thompson, 80, an old and respected citizen of the community, died Sunday. The contract for building the power and lighting transformers for Lock and Dam No. 20 was awarded to the Pennsylvania Transformer Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa., and shipment of the order is expected to be made this week. These transformers were de- signed by Homer H. Wagner who is the chief electrical designing engineer of the Company. Mr. Wagner is the son of W. C. Wagner, contractor and builder of Canton, and is well-known to all Canton residents, being a graduate of Canton High School and of Culver- Stockton College; also graduated in electrical engineering at both the University of Illinois and the Univers- ity of Pittsburgh. The transformers for Lock and Dam No. 20 are the "subway type" of design, which means that they may be operated while completely submerged in water if necessary. The Pennsyl- vania Transformer Co. recently built the largest air blast welding trans- former in the world, which delivers 200,000 amperes for welding seams in the manufacture of steel pipe in sizes as large as 18 inches in diameter. They are now designing a larger unit which will deliver almost /2 million amperes. Culver-Stockton College will open its doors a week earlier than usual this year with freshman days starting on Sept. 7. The new department in business administration and commerce is attracting considerable attention and Joe Hootman of Cantril, la., has been secured as an instructor in that department. Work on the Canton-Meyer nine foot channel dam is nearing its completion. In less than a month this gigantic steel and concrete barrier across the Mms" issippi will be formally turned over to the United State Government. Methodist of Canton in 100th anniversary. County churches will join in omtennial celebration - week of services- meetings will be held each evening Aug. 25 to Sept. I. In the fall of 1831, ev. W. A. H. Spratt, a local preacher, organized the first Methodist Church in Lewis County. Although Canton was the first town in the county and the Methodists had their first class in Canton, the oldest Methodist Church building in the county was Mount Moriah, seven miles northwest of Cantou. The first preacher appointed to the Canton circuit was Rev. James W. Jamieson. The Canton circuit included all of the country north of the Fabius River to and up the Des Moines as far as the present site of the City of Des Moines. It was bounded On the east by the Mississippi River and on the west by vast prairies and extensive forests. 6O YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August Zl, 1925 is visited an epidemic of typhoid fever..Up to Wednesday evening 25 cases had been reported to County Health Physician and it is thought there were several more cases not reported. Three people have died this week as a result of the epidemic. The first one to be called was J. A. Quinn, 70, a prominent life-long resident of the county. Up to 15 years ago he bad been actively engaged in farming and stock raising. At one time Mr Quinn owned the largest tract of land in Lewis County. His farm was located between Maywood and LaGranga The next one to go was Henton Briscoe who .died Monday and the third was Mrs. Walter Reed, who died Tuesday. Mr. Briscoe was engaged in the trucking business in LaGrange. Mrs. Reed was the wife of Walter Reed, who runs the LaGrange filling station. W. A. Smith is handling i pickles at this place for the Canton Ca Factory, and has been receiving a Up to Tuesday he had received nearly 600 bushels, and on Monday got in over 100 bushels. The Ewing High School will open Sept. 7 with new equipment through- out. The new seats are being installed; the greater number of the library books are on hand and the laboratory equipment has been ordered. The new building will not be completed before the first of the year. The housing facilities will be similar to the housing" after the fire last year. The basement of the Queen of Peace Church will be used for the study hall of the junior-senior high school and the city hall for the first six grades, supplemented probably by a private dwelling. 70 YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal August 20, 1915 The records in the office of the Secretary of State show that 'on Aug. 1 there were 68,815 registered motor vehicles in Missouri. Last year the registration was a little more than 54,000. Prosecuting Attorney L. B. Hender- son, Prof. J. J. Toice, Joe Moore, Homer Wallace and G. B. Wooldridge attended the auto races at Quincy Sunday. A large crowd was in attendance, many from this county. The races were said to be good, the best speed being a mile a minute. Hon. B. H. Smith of Canton is prominently mentioned as a candidate for Congress in the First District. St. Louis Republican Drs. Knight and Marchand have gone to LaBelle where they have quite a number of patients for their therapeutic bath. They advertise to remain there I0 days. Died: two miles south of Aug. 18 of cholera infantum, the little son of months I0 days. The graveyard at this place where many of our friends and relatives are laid at rest, is in a bad condition, being over-grown with sprouts, briers, wild grass and weeds, and the ground is covered with litter so that it is not only an eyesore to the passerby but subjects those who go there to attend the interment of a friend or relative, or to visit their graves, to annoyance, inconvenience and trouble. This should not be. A committee will call upon our citizens and an opportunity given for them to contribute of their means for the purpose of improving the grave- yard and removing the evil complain- ed 6f C. R. MaGee, W. G. Allen, W. G. Watson and the Journal are authorized to receive