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October 19, 1978     Press-News Journal
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October 19, 1978
 

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BY MRS. H. J. WENNEKER Wenneker family enjoys weekend visitors Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Wenne- ker enjoyed having four of their children home during the week end. Mrs. Austin Herst of Jacksonville came Friday and visited until Saturday afternoon. She came especial- ly to visit with her brother, Mr. and Mrs. Keith Wermcker of Tulsa, Okla., who arrived Friday night for a week end visit with his parents, and her mother, Mrs. Glessie Reeee in Lewistown. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wenneker svent Friday evening in the home with them. Saturday dinner guests were Mrs. Heiss, the Keith Wennekers, Mr. and Mrs. Merle Weuneker of Queen City and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wenneker. Keith also spent Sunday with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wenneker were dinner guests. The Wennekers spent nights with her mother and on Saturday night they and other members of the Reese family were supper guests of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Wenneker and family in Palmyra. Mrs. Herst also visited her son, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Herst and family and helped Missy celebrate her 10th birthday Saturday. Mrs. Basil Whitaker, Vickie Whitaker, Sonya Schnitzer, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Whitak- er, Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Whitaker and Dana, Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Crabill, Gerri Lynn and Erie were Saturday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Mart Crabill at a mushroom sup- per. Mr. and Mrs. Crabill visited her sister in Mt. Vernon, Ia., Friday and Saturday and gathered a nice lot of mushrooms. Mr. and Mrs. John Ros- :kamp and Mr. and Mrs. i Harold Rockenfield of Sutter drove down Sunday afternoon :. to visit Mr. and Mrs. Jack :: Lantz. ! Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Whi- taker, Kevin and KaTie of il Chicago were down for the week end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Whitak- : er. !] Mrs. Mary Herst has cam - :! pleted her studies at North- east Missouri State university at Kirksville and is practice teaching at Edina. Norman Wenneker of Pal- myra and son, Eddib, were Sunday morning visitors of his mother, Mrs. Dent Wenncker. Mrs. Glessie Reese of Lewis- town, and her daughter, Mrs. Shirley Wenneker, were eve- ning callers. The names of Mr, and Mrs. Bill Taylor was accidently omitted from the list of those attending the birthday supper for Vickie Whitaker at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Kent Thrasher at Bethel. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Snod- grass of Lewistown were Sunday afternoon and supper guests of her mother, Mrs. Jennie Crist. Mrs. Oneta Stambaugh of Hannibal spent part of the week with her sisters, Miss Ina Kitson and Mrs. Clara Mensendick and visited with friends at the senior center. Mrs. Jennie Crist came home the first of the week from a visit with her daugh- ter, Mr. and Mrs. Ernie Burrows and her granddaugh- ters, Karen, Paula and Peggy Snodgrass at Eldon. Mr. and Mrs. Burrows brought her home. Fhonda Ann McEuen, who is staying with her grand- mother, Mrs. Marie Carter while attending John Wood School of Nursing in Quincy, spent the week end with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert McEuen and family in Milton. Mrs. Marie Carter and Fhonda Ann McEuen attended visitation at the Clark Funeral home in Hannibal Monday for a cousin, George Artzen. Mrs. Mary Samms of Glen- dale, Ky., left for her home via plane Tuesday morning after a three week visit with her sisters, Mrs. Dorothy Laughlin in Quincy and Mrs. Albert Toliver, and another sister, Mrs. Martha Home of Scenery Hill, Pa., who also visited in the homes at the same time. All made a number of trips, to see their mother, Mrs. Emma Shoug at the Grandview Manor at Camp Point. They also visited Mrs. Nina Toflver there. Ray Fisher of Hannibal, formerly of here, was greeting old friends and had dinner at the senior center Thursday. Mrs. Lyndell Weuncker took her daughter, Lana, to Ro- chester, Minn., for a check up with her doctors at Mayo Methodist hospital. Lana has returned to her school work at the University of Columbia. Mrs. Betty Thrasher, Carl and Chad.of Bethel were Saturday dinner guests of her mother, Mrs. Basil Whitaker and Vickie. In the afternoon they called in the Danny Whitaker home. The revival services, con- ducted by Rev. Ernest Peat- rick of Williamstown, closed Sunday morning. A basket dinner was held following the morning service. Lori Wenneker, who is attending the University of Columbia was home for the week end with her mother, Mrs. Lyndell Wenneker and Lana. Lana accompanied Lori back to Columbia to resume her studies at the university. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Toliver visited their mothers, Mrs. Nina Toliver and Mrs. Emma Shouse at the Grandview Manor at Camp Point. They went on to Golden where they attended open house for the 50th anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Chalmers Thompson of LaPrairie. Mrs. Thompson and Mrs. Toliver were school mates at the 01d Bowls school near LaBelle. Jim Dudley named Merrell assistant Jim Dudley, former athletic director and basketball coach at Culver-Stockton College, has been appointed as Admin- istra'tive Assistant to Senator Norman Merrell (D-Monticel- lo), president Pro Tern of the Senate. Dudley replaces Estil Fret- well, who is presently a candidate for the District I State Representative. A native of Elsberry, Dud- ley graduated from William Jewell College in 1963, and received his M.A. at the University of Northern Color- ado in 1966. He has been a eaehet.coaeh 'since!  gradua- tion from William Jewell, and for the past eight years was at Culver-SIzkton. He has been active in the National Association of Inter- collegiate Athletics at the district and national levels, and served on the Executive Committee of District 16 and the National Basketball Tour- nament Committee. Dudley, his wife, Connie, and their son, Matt, have moved to Jefferson City to make their home there. ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION -- One of Ewing's most reliable participants at the Senior Center, Ed Kroeger, 88, uses his General Electric riding lawnmower for transportation. His vehicle, parked on the sidewalk in front of the dining area, tells residents that Mr. Kroeger is well and is inside swapping tales or playing cards. the Senior Scene By Mildred Schaffer Betty Shuman, Lewis Co. representative to the Silver Haired Legislature, attended a training session in Shelbina Oct. 6. The purpose was to inform delegates of this area about legislation they will consider when the S.H.L. convenes this month. Fore- most for discussion were no-fault insurance and probate bills. The local council of the LaBelle Senior Stars held their regular meeting Oct. 9. Delegates who had attended the organizational meeting of the Missouri State Council of Senior Citizens in Columbia gave a report and discussed the different proposals that had been presented. In other business, the council elected officers for the coming year. They are Homer Fulton, president; Robert O. Wilson, vice president; Joan Hustead, secretary; Virginia GTeen, treasurer; and Edith .Ftfltn, reporter. LaGrange Hilltop Senior Center now has five day meal service. Meals will be served on Monday as well as Tuesday through Friday. On Saturday evening, Oct. 21, the LaBelle Senior Stars will host a variety show and dance at the Legion Hall in LaBelle. Sandwiches, pie, cake and drinks will be ready at 6 p.m. There will be a charge for the food. Following evening. Joan Hustead said of the event, "Everyone is welcome. Senior citizens es- pecially may want to use the transportation provided from each center hy the van. To reserve a seat on the van sign in at your center on or by Oct. 21." Through a misunderstand- ing your correspondent pro- moted Fred Hinton some 63 years last week. We apologize to both Fred and Virginia Green, who furnished us the information. Such are the hazards of having a well-pub- lic.zed seventh birthday party, especially when the news appears in the senior citizens' column. Tuesday, Oct. 24, Mark Twain Regional Council on Aging will meet at 10 a.m. in the Clarence Senior Citizens Center, 125 W. Chestnut. Contact the Office of Aging in Ewing for transportation,: _= THURSDAY, OCT. 19, 1978 1978 corn may be held in farmer owned reserve Producers holding 1978 crop corn under Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) leans may enter this commodity directly in the farmer owned grain reserve, Ray Fitzgerald, ad- ministrator of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS), recently an- nounced. Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland announced on Aug. 7 he would permit early entry of corn and sorghum ff it appeared by Oct. 1 that the reserve goals would not be met from 1977 crops. At that time Bergland said the department had set a reserve goal of 670 million bushels (corn equivalent) of feed grains, including 500-575 million bushels of corn and 40-60 million bushels of sor- ghum. This includes feed grains held in the reserve as well as feed grains the government has taken over through its price support lean program. About 60 million bushels of sorghum were in reserve by Oct. 1, and therefore immediate entry of 1978 crop sorghum is not authorized, according to Fitz- gerald. Fitzgerald reported that as of Sept. 29 there were 829,360,066 bushels of feed grain and wheat in the grain reserve, based on a telephone survey by ASCS. As of that date, the reserve held 31,584,673 bushels (687,682 metric tons, MT) of barley, 315,469,800 bushels (8,013,356 Mr) of corn , 36,065,104 bush- els (523,489 MT) of oats, 48,543,121 bushels (1,233,062 MT) of sorghum, and 397,697,- 368 bushels (10,822,492 biT) of wheat. The feed grain (corn equivalent) in the reserve totals 413 bushels. CCC has taken over 10.1 million bushels of corn and 11.3 million bushels of sorghum. The grain reserve takes certain grains off the market for a period of up to three years, or until market prices reach stated levels. At the same time, Fitzger- ald announced the telephone survey results, ASCS released its regular weekly price SUpD0rt Ioa activity retort. grains in the farmer owned reserve and other data. The data in the weekly report lags behind the figures reported recently by the administrator because of the time taken to mail the date for the weekly report to Kansas City for processing. Refresher classes Lewis County ambulances made eight runs this past week transporting the sick and injured of the county to and from the hospital of their choice. Someone is always on call if you need an ambulance. Dial 0 and ask for Enterprise 30135 or ff in Monticello dial 5296. Be patient, time is never as long as it seems to those sick or injured, the ambulance will be on the way in just a few minutes with trained personnel. When you call be sure to give exact directions to your home as. no one can possibly know where everyone in the county lives. Refresher classes were can- celled due to lack of interest. We are sorry but instructors have a goal that due to funds they must meet. I will keep you informed as to where and when a class may in the future be held. There will be a Basic Life Support for EMTs in Edina at the nursing home beginning Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. This will be the only class this close to the county for two years at least. If ever you have desired to take the training to become an EMT and live in the western part of the county this is a good chance. Perhaps you could make a car pool and several of you go together. This training is marvelous if only for your own knowledge of the body and how it works. We are often asked to be on stand-by at gatherings such as Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Ginther returned home Satur- day from a 10 day vacation in the Ozarks. Happy birthday was sung Friday at the Senior Adult Center for Mrs.. Kathleen Clickner's birthday. 25 ate dinner at the center and several dinners were sent out. Mary Figgins" called on Cora Schofield Friday afternoon. Slide films will be shown and Southern Baptist Mission ., in Brazil will be meaweanesaay, Oct. 25, at 7:30 p.m. at the Baptist church. Mrs. Roy Crist of LaGrange will present the program, sponsored by the Everly Hayes Baptist Women. The clean-up sale Saturday of Mrs. Herbert Barr was well i.',.."n..*m NECA C Advisory Board i games or camp, board's policy endangers life teers on duty so attend, we will Otherwise the get to the possible if a call is I It is not possible t at all of the someone m]ght the time. ff we could next call State Security reject The Service ternational has been representative d unit at the sion director rich said After the statewide State Board that 59 per voting cast union per cent representatio A former tion official knowledge in union have been first time the to receive the votes. attended. Rev. and Pulliam of attended the dinner at the church Friday for the harvest sale on; Mr. and and sons were guests of Hazel Stan Rushta filled the church evening.. His ter accom were guests Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Cristy of the week end Mrs. Herbert , the supper, LaBelle seniors hears priority needs | , will provide entertainment.  i i I i till il i Considering their usual array .Awe0000.t o, o,. Pres"en, S DSk,.v,no, ........ -' ............... LaBelle called the Lewis Skirvin. i [ Sears Wash r wit ] Band will play for a dance order at the new given apoverty profile for- after the show. Donations will 12,timelnOfcant2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. Lewis County by Clara Pet- - ,' be taken to help defray costs. " on. Reports were ers, planner. She then explain- =-= e Door prizes and an afghan g!ven by Veva C., center ed to the board the need of _== Popular F(  L1 will be awarded during the aloe; aarma mim, nester County.three priority needs for Lewis -These will.be imple- = .w00o me-- nte ol o**, agency for the coming year. - o,= m ' ) @2 IIN ,S; The three goals of special j --hi "" "'1 interest were decided to be = unly   .,-- ]  i ' @ 4 Wltel" '  employment, with emphasis - on the youth; winterization of -  - . ,, == _- homes, with emphasis on  ureat a. uresset f,nances conservation of energy; and   Sweaters" d " ..... I./l [ " 1|  I|  nutrition with emphasis on ==  .1 lop, Oirl i education and cooperation - = . . =_.j ] , .... ' Fabric 00oitem00 ] acre ! with the feod stamp prgram" =  Accessories m smc ,i The meeting adjourned until - q'_ ..' th =  '" e next meeting on Nov. 2at - T . .. _ .  2 p.m. Everyone is welcome -  ne I'osmon veople i to attend the meetings, i i' -,.-. ,, I " -- I i MVFNHF r)pg. SUBSCRIBE | ,," "" '-' "'" =,;r-o" ""-  ! we do. the 00ederal 00aod 00ank I TOO,00V TO Pm I S,te00. 00i,,ion00 00ores I"'"''"'" nnllflllUtanllnlinnllnltnlllnlUlnllllnlfl i! I r I agricultural production. We're I tlW/ '[/ ! agriculture s own credit source for | , i all kinds of long term capital needs. I ;nit 1 [ I! X D"  I Owned by and operated for the I Homecom.00_9", I .,, I benefit of farmers, r,a_nchers and | I gather a most important crop-- I Decl Trad=t=onal Homeco )ilI1]'" _i. I == ";''"" " !  I rural home owners. Its our job to I -, -" .. I capital. Money to keep agriculture at I ._ I full capacity, able to feed and help I t lies t / mlt Mu i * e | clothe the other 95% of our | " ms Onl $279,s | population...plus untold millions in | [. pping, installation extra Pricei, cata|ogprice do Greek letter or C S Only St 7s " " 8ears has a credit plan to suit most every need .. Rg Hurr 'IC 'oUI' ' Each of these advertised items is readily available for sale as advertised i s.,!,,,o.,o. .....,.e.o. o...o...o.. I SAM II[Ii[ItDZ[N ! .,ow.. w, o,., , 0 No w, 328 LEWIS ST. CANTON, MO. I Asst. Vice President I 00Sears3 , .,... ?lowers Dy 00ller! , ir  s4-:m.sn: s.,.o.u,.o. MON. - SAT. 8.00 5.30 I I Office - Conton .ou., ,o. , T--,k. ! CANTON CANTON -- LAGRANGE LS / " IIIII Illllllll I ImlS IHL: 8111 |11  111 r  '|':,m" i7 l BY MRS. H. J. WENNEKER Wenneker family enjoys weekend visitors Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Wenne- ker enjoyed having four of their children home during the week end. Mrs. Austin Herst of Jacksonville came Friday and visited until Saturday afternoon. She came especial- ly to visit with her brother, Mr. and Mrs. Keith Wermcker of Tulsa, Okla., who arrived Friday night for a week end visit with his parents, and her mother, Mrs. Glessie Reeee in Lewistown. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wenneker svent Friday evening in the home with them. Saturday dinner guests were Mrs. Heiss, the Keith Wennekers, Mr. and Mrs. Merle Weuneker of Queen City and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wenneker. Keith also spent Sunday with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wenneker were dinner guests. The Wennekers spent nights with her mother and on Saturday night they and other members of the Reese family were supper guests of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Wenneker and family in Palmyra. Mrs. Herst also visited her son, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Herst and family and helped Missy celebrate her 10th birthday Saturday. Mrs. Basil Whitaker, Vickie Whitaker, Sonya Schnitzer, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Whitak- er, Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Whitaker and Dana, Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Crabill, Gerri Lynn and Erie were Saturday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Mart Crabill at a mushroom sup- per. Mr. and Mrs. Crabill visited her sister in Mt. Vernon, Ia., Friday and Saturday and gathered a nice lot of mushrooms. Mr. and Mrs. John Ros- :kamp and Mr. and Mrs. i Harold Rockenfield of Sutter drove down Sunday afternoon :. to visit Mr. and Mrs. Jack :: Lantz. ! Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Whi- taker, Kevin and KaTie of il Chicago were down for the week end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Whitak- : er. !] Mrs. Mary Herst has cam - :! pleted her studies at North- east Missouri State university at Kirksville and is practice teaching at Edina. Norman Wenneker of Pal- myra and son, Eddib, were Sunday morning visitors of his mother, Mrs. Dent Wenncker. Mrs. Glessie Reese of Lewis- town, and her daughter, Mrs. Shirley Wenneker, were eve- ning callers. The names of Mr, and Mrs. Bill Taylor was accidently omitted from the list of those attending the birthday supper for Vickie Whitaker at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Kent Thrasher at Bethel. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Snod- grass of Lewistown were Sunday afternoon and supper guests of her mother, Mrs. Jennie Crist. Mrs. Oneta Stambaugh of Hannibal spent part of the week with her sisters, Miss Ina Kitson and Mrs. Clara Mensendick and visited with friends at the senior center. Mrs. Jennie Crist came home the first of the week from a visit with her daugh- ter, Mr. and Mrs. Ernie Burrows and her granddaugh- ters, Karen, Paula and Peggy Snodgrass at Eldon. Mr. and Mrs. Burrows brought her home. Fhonda Ann McEuen, who is staying with her grand- mother, Mrs. Marie Carter while attending John Wood School of Nursing in Quincy, spent the week end with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert McEuen and family in Milton. Mrs. Marie Carter and Fhonda Ann McEuen attended visitation at the Clark Funeral home in Hannibal Monday for a cousin, George Artzen. Mrs. Mary Samms of Glen- dale, Ky., left for her home via plane Tuesday morning after a three week visit with her sisters, Mrs. Dorothy Laughlin in Quincy and Mrs. Albert Toliver, and another sister, Mrs. Martha Home of Scenery Hill, Pa., who also visited in the homes at the same time. All made a number of trips, to see their mother, Mrs. Emma Shoug at the Grandview Manor at Camp Point. They also visited Mrs. Nina Toflver there. Ray Fisher of Hannibal, formerly of here, was greeting old friends and had dinner at the senior center Thursday. Mrs. Lyndell Weuncker took her daughter, Lana, to Ro- chester, Minn., for a check up with her doctors at Mayo Methodist hospital. Lana has returned to her school work at the University of Columbia. Mrs. Betty Thrasher, Carl and Chad.of Bethel were Saturday dinner guests of her mother, Mrs. Basil Whitaker and Vickie. In the afternoon they called in the Danny Whitaker home. The revival services, con- ducted by Rev. Ernest Peat- rick of Williamstown, closed Sunday morning. A basket dinner was held following the morning service. Lori Wenneker, who is attending the University of Columbia was home for the week end with her mother, Mrs. Lyndell Wenneker and Lana. Lana accompanied Lori back to Columbia to resume her studies at the university. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Toliver visited their mothers, Mrs. Nina Toliver and Mrs. Emma Shouse at the Grandview Manor at Camp Point. They went on to Golden where they attended open house for the 50th anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Chalmers Thompson of LaPrairie. Mrs. Thompson and Mrs. Toliver were school mates at the 01d Bowls school near LaBelle. Jim Dudley named Merrell assistant Jim Dudley, former athletic director and basketball coach at Culver-Stockton College, has been appointed as Admin- istra'tive Assistant to Senator Norman Merrell (D-Monticel- lo), president Pro Tern of the Senate. Dudley replaces Estil Fret- well, who is presently a candidate for the District I State Representative. A native of Elsberry, Dud- ley graduated from William Jewell College in 1963, and received his M.A. at the University of Northern Color- ado in 1966. He has been a eaehet.coaeh 'since!  gradua- tion from William Jewell, and for the past eight years was at Culver-SIzkton. He has been active in the National Association of Inter- collegiate Athletics at the district and national levels, and served on the Executive Committee of District 16 and the National Basketball Tour- nament Committee. Dudley, his wife, Connie, and their son, Matt, have moved to Jefferson City to make their home there. ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION -- One of Ewing's most reliable participants at the Senior Center, Ed Kroeger, 88, uses his General Electric riding lawnmower for transportation. His vehicle, parked on the sidewalk in front of the dining area, tells residents that Mr. Kroeger is well and is inside swapping tales or playing cards. the Senior Scene By Mildred Schaffer Betty Shuman, Lewis Co. representative to the Silver Haired Legislature, attended a training session in Shelbina Oct. 6. The purpose was to inform delegates of this area about legislation they will consider when the S.H.L. convenes this month. Fore- most for discussion were no-fault insurance and probate bills. The local council of the LaBelle Senior Stars held their regular meeting Oct. 9. Delegates who had attended the organizational meeting of the Missouri State Council of Senior Citizens in Columbia gave a report and discussed the different proposals that had been presented. In other business, the council elected officers for the coming year. They are Homer Fulton, president; Robert O. Wilson, vice president; Joan Hustead, secretary; Virginia GTeen, treasurer; and Edith .Ftfltn, reporter. LaGrange Hilltop Senior Center now has five day meal service. Meals will be served on Monday as well as Tuesday through Friday. On Saturday evening, Oct. 21, the LaBelle Senior Stars will host a variety show and dance at the Legion Hall in LaBelle. Sandwiches, pie, cake and drinks will be ready at 6 p.m. There will be a charge for the food. Following evening. Joan Hustead said of the event, "Everyone is welcome. Senior citizens es- pecially may want to use the transportation provided from each center hy the van. To reserve a seat on the van sign in at your center on or by Oct. 21." Through a misunderstand- ing your correspondent pro- moted Fred Hinton some 63 years last week. We apologize to both Fred and Virginia Green, who furnished us the information. Such are the hazards of having a well-pub- lic.zed seventh birthday party, especially when the news appears in the senior citizens' column. Tuesday, Oct. 24, Mark Twain Regional Council on Aging will meet at 10 a.m. in the Clarence Senior Citizens Center, 125 W. Chestnut. Contact the Office of Aging in Ewing for transportation,: _= THURSDAY, OCT. 19, 1978 1978 corn may be held in farmer owned reserve Producers holding 1978 crop corn under Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) leans may enter this commodity directly in the farmer owned grain reserve, Ray Fitzgerald, ad- ministrator of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS), recently an- nounced. Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland announced on Aug. 7 he would permit early entry of corn and sorghum ff it appeared by Oct. 1 that the reserve goals would not be met from 1977 crops. At that time Bergland said the department had set a reserve goal of 670 million bushels (corn equivalent) of feed grains, including 500-575 million bushels of corn and 40-60 million bushels of sor- ghum. This includes feed grains held in the reserve as well as feed grains the government has taken over through its price support lean program. About 60 million bushels of sorghum were in reserve by Oct. 1, and therefore immediate entry of 1978 crop sorghum is not authorized, according to Fitz- gerald. Fitzgerald reported that as of Sept. 29 there were 829,360,066 bushels of feed grain and wheat in the grain reserve, based on a telephone survey by ASCS. As of that date, the reserve held 31,584,673 bushels (687,682 metric tons, MT) of barley, 315,469,800 bushels (8,013,356 Mr) of corn , 36,065,104 bush- els (523,489 MT) of oats, 48,543,121 bushels (1,233,062 MT) of sorghum, and 397,697,- 368 bushels (10,822,492 biT) of wheat. The feed grain (corn equivalent) in the reserve totals 413 bushels. CCC has taken over 10.1 million bushels of corn and 11.3 million bushels of sorghum. The grain reserve takes certain grains off the market for a period of up to three years, or until market prices reach stated levels. At the same time, Fitzger- ald announced the telephone survey results, ASCS released its regular weekly price SUpD0rt Ioa activity retort. grains in the farmer owned reserve and other data. The data in the weekly report lags behind the figures reported recently by the administrator because of the time taken to mail the date for the weekly report to Kansas City for processing. Refresher classes Lewis County ambulances made eight runs this past week transporting the sick and injured of the county to and from the hospital of their choice. Someone is always on call if you need an ambulance. Dial 0 and ask for Enterprise 30135 or ff in Monticello dial 5296. Be patient, time is never as long as it seems to those sick or injured, the ambulance will be on the way in just a few minutes with trained personnel. When you call be sure to give exact directions to your home as. no one can possibly know where everyone in the county lives. Refresher classes were can- celled due to lack of interest. We are sorry but instructors have a goal that due to funds they must meet. I will keep you informed as to where and when a class may in the future be held. There will be a Basic Life Support for EMTs in Edina at the nursing home beginning Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. This will be the only class this close to the county for two years at least. If ever you have desired to take the training to become an EMT and live in the western part of the county this is a good chance. Perhaps you could make a car pool and several of you go together. This training is marvelous if only for your own knowledge of the body and how it works. We are often asked to be on stand-by at gatherings such as Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Ginther returned home Satur- day from a 10 day vacation in the Ozarks. Happy birthday was sung Friday at the Senior Adult Center for Mrs.. Kathleen Clickner's birthday. 25 ate dinner at the center and several dinners were sent out. Mary Figgins" called on Cora Schofield Friday afternoon. Slide films will be shown and Southern Baptist Mission ., in Brazil will be meaweanesaay, Oct. 25, at 7:30 p.m. at the Baptist church. Mrs. Roy Crist of LaGrange will present the program, sponsored by the Everly Hayes Baptist Women. The clean-up sale Saturday of Mrs. Herbert Barr was well i.',.."n..*m NECA C Advisory Board i games or camp, board's policy endangers life teers on duty so attend, we will Otherwise the get to the possible if a call is I It is not possible t at all of the someone m]ght the time. ff we could next call State Security reject The Service ternational has been representative d unit at the sion director rich said After the statewide State Board that 59 per voting cast union per cent representatio A former tion official knowledge in union have been first time the to receive the votes. attended. Rev. and Pulliam of attended the dinner at the church Friday for the harvest sale on; Mr. and and sons were guests of Hazel Stan Rushta filled the church evening.. His ter accom were guests Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Cristy of the week end Mrs. Herbert , the supper, LaBelle seniors hears priority needs | , will provide entertainment.  i i I i till il i Considering their usual array .Awe0000.t o, o,. Pres"en, S DSk,.v,no, ........ -' ............... LaBelle called the Lewis Skirvin. i [ Sears Wash r wit ] Band will play for a dance order at the new given apoverty profile for- after the show. Donations will 12,timelnOfcant2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. Lewis County by Clara Pet- - ,' be taken to help defray costs. " on. Reports were ers, planner. She then explain- =-= e Door prizes and an afghan g!ven by Veva C., center ed to the board the need of _== Popular F(  L1 will be awarded during the aloe; aarma mim, nester County.three priority needs for Lewis -These will.be imple- = .w00o me-- nte ol o**, agency for the coming year. - o,= m ' ) @2 IIN ,S; The three goals of special j --hi "" "'1 interest were decided to be = unly   .,-- ]  i ' @ 4 Wltel" '  employment, with emphasis - on the youth; winterization of -  - . ,, == _- homes, with emphasis on  ureat a. uresset f,nances conservation of energy; and   Sweaters" d " ..... I./l [ " 1|  I|  nutrition with emphasis on ==  .1 lop, Oirl i education and cooperation - = . . =_.j ] , .... ' Fabric 00oitem00 ] acre ! with the feod stamp prgram" =  Accessories m smc ,i The meeting adjourned until - q'_ ..' th =  '" e next meeting on Nov. 2at - T . .. _ .  2 p.m. Everyone is welcome -  ne I'osmon veople i to attend the meetings, i i' -,.-. ,, I " -- I i MVFNHF r)pg. SUBSCRIBE | ,," "" '-' "'" =,;r-o" ""-  ! we do. the 00ederal 00aod 00ank I TOO,00V TO Pm I S,te00. 00i,,ion00 00ores I"'"''"'" nnllflllUtanllnlinnllnltnlllnlUlnllllnlfl i! I r I agricultural production. We're I tlW/ '[/ ! agriculture s own credit source for | , i all kinds of long term capital needs. I ;nit 1 [ I! X D"  I Owned by and operated for the I Homecom.00_9", I .,, I benefit of farmers, r,a_nchers and | I gather a most important crop-- I Decl Trad=t=onal Homeco )ilI1]'" _i. I == ";''"" " !  I rural home owners. Its our job to I -, -" .. I capital. Money to keep agriculture at I ._ I full capacity, able to feed and help I t lies t / mlt Mu i * e | clothe the other 95% of our | " ms Onl $279,s | population...plus untold millions in | [. pping, installation extra Pricei, cata|ogprice do Greek letter or C S Only St 7s " " 8ears has a credit plan to suit most every need .. Rg Hurr 'IC 'oUI' ' Each of these advertised items is readily available for sale as advertised i s.,!,,,o.,o. .....,.e.o. o...o...o.. I SAM II[Ii[ItDZ[N ! .,ow.. w, o,., , 0 No w, 328 LEWIS ST. CANTON, MO. I Asst. Vice President I 00Sears3 , .,... ?lowers Dy 00ller! , ir  s4-:m.sn: s.,.o.u,.o. MON. - SAT. 8.00 5.30 I I Office - Conton .ou., ,o. , T--,k. ! CANTON CANTON -- LAGRANGE LS / " IIIII Illllllll I ImlS IHL: 8111 |11  111 r  '|':,m" i7 l