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October 19, 1978     Press-News Journal
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October 19, 1978
 

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Frankly Speaking SENATOR TOM EAGLETON US. Senate, Washlgton, D.C. 20510 BASIC EDUCATION -- IN WITH THE NEW In my last column, I discussed the Reading Improvement Program. This program, which I sponsored in the Senate in 1974, started out with lofty goals and intentions, but simply never lived up to its promise. The idea was to take modest amounts of federal money and set up "demonstration projects" in reading education. The knowledge and techniques thus developed were supposed to be spread throughout the education community. But the program never worked out that way. Most of the money ended up supporting already-established projects. While these certainly were worthwhile expenditures, they did not bring us the new ideas or new methods for improved reading institutions which the program was designed to produce. So, Congress has decided to scrap the Reading Improvement Program, and in its place we have approved a program aimed at improving education in all of the basic skills--not only reading, but also writing, spelling and math. Once again, the bulk of the funding is intended for "demonstration projects" in local schools. This time, howcvcr, the grants for these projects will be awarded directly by the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, rather than by administrators lower down in the department. This should insure that the funds go to the kind of projects Congress intended. What kind of projects might thcsc be? Among other things, they will bc programs to find better ways to get parents and volunteers inwflvcd in the teaching of basic skills. We also will bc looking tr new ways to utilize existing community resources such as parks and museums in basic skills education. And, wc will bc exploring better ways to use such worthwhile programs as Reading is FUNdamental, the program which makes good books for "fun" reading available to children at prices their allowances can afford. A second part of this new federal effort will be to help Ihc individual states (tcvclot) their own basic skills testing programs. Standardized achicvcnacnt tests (such as the recently-established BEST test in Missouri) arc becoming marc and marc imp,'tant as aids to assure good basic education. They help to assure parcnts and students that they are getting the education they deserve, and at the same time help teachers and school adnfinistrators determine where limitcd resources might best bc expended. The federal govcrnmcm spends billitms of dollars each year lo help clcmcntary and sccondav-y education on the local level. With the assistance of programs such as the new basic skills cfforl, wc will bc able to better focus that money to help reverse the shocking lcclinc of elementary and secondary educational achievement. Clinic staff C-S faculty and students to meet legislators U. S. Senator Thomas Eagleton and Congressman Harold Volkmer will visit the Culver-Stockton College cam- pus Oct. 24 to meet informally with Culver-Stockton faculty and students, Sen. Eagleton and Rep. Volkmer are expected to arrive about 8:30 a.m. and spend pert of the morning on campus, said vice president for college relations, Charles Edwards. "Both Sen. Eagleton and Rep. Volkmer will be here to meet our new president, Dr. Robert Brown, and meet informally with students," Edwards said. "The occasion is not a ceremonial one, but an opportunity for them to personally meet with Dr. Brown, our staff, and stu- dents." (From left to right) Patrick B. Ball o( KirksviiIe, Jerry W. Loekard of Sedalla, Patrlcia A. Alien of Kirksvllle, Joseph R. DeKay of Port Washington, N. Y., Bruce A. Gastineau of Kettering, O., and H. Lee Schneider, Jr., of Jefferson City, all senior student physicians at the Klrksvilie College of Osteopathic Medicine, are currently staffing the LaBelle Rural Extension Clinic under the supervision of members of the College's Department of General Practice. The clinic at LaBelle is one of the II operated by KCOM in northeast Missouri. services, there Highway patrol investigates the highway predict when or 10 accidents in September " During the month of Sept., protected or shaded areas for urging all..diff 1978, members of Troop B of which motorists should be every nrm especislly watchful. the Missouri State Highway . covered Patrol investigated 192 traffic Capt. Ray pointed out that ......... accidents in the sixteen these conditions often arise counties of Northeast Missouri and then dissipate as quickly "--...--u, all{ in which four persons were as they occurred. Despite the PNJ WAR! killed and 127 persons were advantages of the weather  -- injured. ...  __  Ten accidents in Lewis -- County in September resulted Ikmdllllll[ 81l[eLm in only three injuries, and no m U lr II " fatalities. Total for the year in Lewis County is 120 accidents, resulting in 66 injuries and2 'e, C a 1  1  O LI deaths. After commenting on the Sept. crashes, Captain C.E. Ray, Commanding officer of Troop B, Macon, reminded motorists of a treacherous seasonal hazard which they will soon encounter. Tempera- tures do not have to fall to 32 degrees to have a slick bridge floor or frost covered road- way. During early fall mornings, certain weather conditions are often present that can cause an individual bridge floor to frost over in minutes. The same conditions can exist on the surface of highways in Missouri soybean growers to vote on program Missouri soybean growers will have an opportunity to register and vote this winter on a grower investment program designed to improve their profits through market expansion and research activ- ities, according to Dave Haggard, president of the Missouri Soybean Association. The soybean referendum was authorized last week by Jack Runyan, Missouri Direc- tor of Agriculture, following approval of enabling legisla- tion and a Sept. 21 hearing on the subject. "The Missouri Soybean As- sociation is extremely pleased that Missouri soybean produc- ers will now have the right to vote on a soybean referen- dum," Haggard said. "Ap- proval of a grower investment or soybean checkoff program, will give Missouri soybean producers the opportunity to DEMOCRA T Banquet & Rally Thurs., Oct. 26, 1978 7:30 P.M. * Highland High School Ewing, Mo. JOSEPH P. TEASDALE Governor of Missouri will be the Guest Speaker improve their praters tm-ougn grower-managed programs. It means we wouldn't have to wait for the government or industry to come through with programs, but that we grow- ers can develop and manage our own market expansion and research activities wflieh will help improve our profits." More than 370,000 soybean growers in 18 states are currently participating in this type of grower investment program. These grower funds are now matched more than two to one by government and industry funds. The soybean market expansion activities began in Japan in 1956 and now operate in 76 countries around the world. As a result, Japan alone now imports one of every 10 rows of soybeans grown in the U.S. "The soybean grower in- vestment checkoff program is a proven success," Haggard said. "They have helped build soybeans into the Number 1 cash crop in both the U.S. and Missouri. As a result of these programs, every other row of soybeans produced in Mis- souri is sold overseas and our crop is worth $813 million. "I feel strongly that Mis- souri producers should sup- port this program for three reasons. First, these funds will help our future profits bv meeting the worldwide com- petition of Brazilian soybeans and the challenge of research- ing solutions to problems such as the cyst nematode. Second, I feel comfortable knowing that my grower investment funds will be managed and i vou can iBanl4 g, on it! GLENN A. MILLER Executive Vice President CANTON STATE BAtiK This year is turning out to be a blue-ribbon year for grain production. World- wide, the harvest of wheat, rice, and other grains will j come to some 1.38 billion tons, topping the previous record of 1.35 billion tons in 1976. This is good news because it suggests a leveling-off in food price increases. In turn, it means curbing inflation. This year's grain production helps signal another hopeful sign for 1978 the 4% increase expected in the real Gross National Product (G N P) for the year, which is the same as 4% increase in wealth. This is not an in- crease in money. Real wealth is created by the production of goods and services. Money is only a measure of wealth. A too- rapid increase in money circulation increases in- flation; an increase in wealth curbs inflation ... helping to stabilize the American dollar and meaning a gradual rise in, the American standard of living ... you can BANK on it! cJt00o [il CANTON. MO. THURSDAY, OCT. 19, 1978 invested by Missouri growers. And third, those growers who do not with to invest their funds in this manner may have their checkoff refund- ed." Missouri soybean growers who wish to vote in the late January soybean referendum must first register to vote at their county ASCS office. The registration period will be held from Nov. 27 to Jan. 5. Soybean referendum ballots will be mailed only to those producers who have register- ed between Nov. 27 and Jan. 5. "This referendum is a very important issue to the profits of Missouri soybean produc- ers," Haggard said. "Because of this, I hope every Missouri grower will register ,and vote." Entertainment by the Highland Swing Band TICKETS $5.00 Sponsored by the Lewis County Democrat Central CommnHee. Advance tickets may be purchased from the following Ticket Chairman Phone Robert Merrell ............. 767.5370 Estil Fretwell .............. 767-5372 Nell Little .................. 767-5349 Mr. & Mrs. Stanlipy Wilson .288-5541 Mr. & Mrs. Sam Plant ..... 497-2688 Mr. & Mrs. Robert Cary .... 288-5288 Bill Murphy ................ 853-4582 Donnie Goings ............. 494-3575 Marsha Allison ............. 853-2393 Anna Nrgret Carter ...... 478-3559 Champ Todd ............... 655-2225 Pearl Ritter ............ 816-278-3116 Betty Lillard ............... 655-2273 Beverly Kern .............. 494-3302 Carol Rich ................. 288-5700 Anqu sifts, refinished printer, trays, panrs *lle,  g  :in dolls, .amity frar.ny Iw'i wooden ware, primitiveS, mlrmlvre frames, lectibl, I' PHONE 314- 769- 3890 303 W. Jefferson Palmyra, PALMYRA LIV AUCTION V2 mile south of Palmyra, M0. on Highway 61 AUCTION EVERY MONDA Fat Butcher 10:30 a.m. 'sow, ,nd Large demand for quality feeder pigs. selli to 1000 head o week. We are becoming concerned about sanitation for both the h,ver. For help in your feeder pig buying or selling call RUSTY ROTHWEILER 314-478-3548 or 314-769- 5 PACKER BUYERS Stacker, 1:30 p.m. c..,.. Terrific demand Cows and Bulb for good condition Andy Anderson Dwight Phone 314.769.3058 Phone 3 00hcje 600)ur A well-planned advertising program gets resultsl Our creative ad staff will join forces to turn your selling message into innovative ads that get re- sults. Call, and let's discuss your best strategyl lmmmmmnmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm | SPECIAL CATTLE i SALE AT :KAHOKA SALE COM a. IHOI, MISSOURI " Wednesday, October, 25, 19711 : Starhiig" on Cattle at 1 P.M. If you have cattle to sell them to tins sale. All cattle sold in order recieved. This sale will be advertised over a large area. i For. further mformahon ca//Sale Barn 816.727.3954 Btll Ryan 314.288.$76 ! - Jerry Miller mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Frankly Speaking SENATOR TOM EAGLETON US. Senate, Washlgton, D.C. 20510 BASIC EDUCATION -- IN WITH THE NEW In my last column, I discussed the Reading Improvement Program. This program, which I sponsored in the Senate in 1974, started out with lofty goals and intentions, but simply never lived up to its promise. The idea was to take modest amounts of federal money and set up "demonstration projects" in reading education. The knowledge and techniques thus developed were supposed to be spread throughout the education community. But the program never worked out that way. Most of the money ended up supporting already-established projects. While these certainly were worthwhile expenditures, they did not bring us the new ideas or new methods for improved reading institutions which the program was designed to produce. So, Congress has decided to scrap the Reading Improvement Program, and in its place we have approved a program aimed at improving education in all of the basic skills--not only reading, but also writing, spelling and math. Once again, the bulk of the funding is intended for "demonstration projects" in local schools. This time, howcvcr, the grants for these projects will be awarded directly by the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, rather than by administrators lower down in the department. This should insure that the funds go to the kind of projects Congress intended. What kind of projects might thcsc be? Among other things, they will bc programs to find better ways to get parents and volunteers inwflvcd in the teaching of basic skills. We also will bc looking tr new ways to utilize existing community resources such as parks and museums in basic skills education. And, wc will bc exploring better ways to use such worthwhile programs as Reading is FUNdamental, the program which makes good books for "fun" reading available to children at prices their allowances can afford. A second part of this new federal effort will be to help Ihc individual states (tcvclot) their own basic skills testing programs. Standardized achicvcnacnt tests (such as the recently-established BEST test in Missouri) arc becoming marc and marc imp,'tant as aids to assure good basic education. They help to assure parcnts and students that they are getting the education they deserve, and at the same time help teachers and school adnfinistrators determine where limitcd resources might best bc expended. The federal govcrnmcm spends billitms of dollars each year lo help clcmcntary and sccondav-y education on the local level. With the assistance of programs such as the new basic skills cfforl, wc will bc able to better focus that money to help reverse the shocking lcclinc of elementary and secondary educational achievement. Clinic staff C-S faculty and students to meet legislators U. S. Senator Thomas Eagleton and Congressman Harold Volkmer will visit the Culver-Stockton College cam- pus Oct. 24 to meet informally with Culver-Stockton faculty and students, Sen. Eagleton and Rep. Volkmer are expected to arrive about 8:30 a.m. and spend pert of the morning on campus, said vice president for college relations, Charles Edwards. "Both Sen. Eagleton and Rep. Volkmer will be here to meet our new president, Dr. Robert Brown, and meet informally with students," Edwards said. "The occasion is not a ceremonial one, but an opportunity for them to personally meet with Dr. Brown, our staff, and stu- dents." (From left to right) Patrick B. Ball o( KirksviiIe, Jerry W. Loekard of Sedalla, Patrlcia A. Alien of Kirksvllle, Joseph R. DeKay of Port Washington, N. Y., Bruce A. Gastineau of Kettering, O., and H. Lee Schneider, Jr., of Jefferson City, all senior student physicians at the Klrksvilie College of Osteopathic Medicine, are currently staffing the LaBelle Rural Extension Clinic under the supervision of members of the College's Department of General Practice. The clinic at LaBelle is one of the II operated by KCOM in northeast Missouri. services, there Highway patrol investigates the highway predict when or 10 accidents in September " During the month of Sept., protected or shaded areas for urging all..diff 1978, members of Troop B of which motorists should be every nrm especislly watchful. the Missouri State Highway . covered Patrol investigated 192 traffic Capt. Ray pointed out that ......... accidents in the sixteen these conditions often arise counties of Northeast Missouri and then dissipate as quickly "--...--u, all{ in which four persons were as they occurred. Despite the PNJ WAR! killed and 127 persons were advantages of the weather  -- injured. ...  __  Ten accidents in Lewis -- County in September resulted Ikmdllllll[ 81l[eLm in only three injuries, and no m U lr II " fatalities. Total for the year in Lewis County is 120 accidents, resulting in 66 injuries and2 'e, C a 1  1  O LI deaths. After commenting on the Sept. crashes, Captain C.E. Ray, Commanding officer of Troop B, Macon, reminded motorists of a treacherous seasonal hazard which they will soon encounter. Tempera- tures do not have to fall to 32 degrees to have a slick bridge floor or frost covered road- way. During early fall mornings, certain weather conditions are often present that can cause an individual bridge floor to frost over in minutes. The same conditions can exist on the surface of highways in Missouri soybean growers to vote on program Missouri soybean growers will have an opportunity to register and vote this winter on a grower investment program designed to improve their profits through market expansion and research activ- ities, according to Dave Haggard, president of the Missouri Soybean Association. The soybean referendum was authorized last week by Jack Runyan, Missouri Direc- tor of Agriculture, following approval of enabling legisla- tion and a Sept. 21 hearing on the subject. "The Missouri Soybean As- sociation is extremely pleased that Missouri soybean produc- ers will now have the right to vote on a soybean referen- dum," Haggard said. "Ap- proval of a grower investment or soybean checkoff program, will give Missouri soybean producers the opportunity to DEMOCRA T Banquet & Rally Thurs., Oct. 26, 1978 7:30 P.M. * Highland High School Ewing, Mo. JOSEPH P. TEASDALE Governor of Missouri will be the Guest Speaker improve their praters tm-ougn grower-managed programs. It means we wouldn't have to wait for the government or industry to come through with programs, but that we grow- ers can develop and manage our own market expansion and research activities wflieh will help improve our profits." More than 370,000 soybean growers in 18 states are currently participating in this type of grower investment program. These grower funds are now matched more than two to one by government and industry funds. The soybean market expansion activities began in Japan in 1956 and now operate in 76 countries around the world. As a result, Japan alone now imports one of every 10 rows of soybeans grown in the U.S. "The soybean grower in- vestment checkoff program is a proven success," Haggard said. "They have helped build soybeans into the Number 1 cash crop in both the U.S. and Missouri. As a result of these programs, every other row of soybeans produced in Mis- souri is sold overseas and our crop is worth $813 million. "I feel strongly that Mis- souri producers should sup- port this program for three reasons. First, these funds will help our future profits bv meeting the worldwide com- petition of Brazilian soybeans and the challenge of research- ing solutions to problems such as the cyst nematode. Second, I feel comfortable knowing that my grower investment funds will be managed and i vou can iBanl4 g, on it! GLENN A. MILLER Executive Vice President CANTON STATE BAtiK This year is turning out to be a blue-ribbon year for grain production. World- wide, the harvest of wheat, rice, and other grains will j come to some 1.38 billion tons, topping the previous record of 1.35 billion tons in 1976. This is good news because it suggests a leveling-off in food price increases. In turn, it means curbing inflation. This year's grain production helps signal another hopeful sign for 1978 the 4% increase expected in the real Gross National Product (G N P) for the year, which is the same as 4% increase in wealth. This is not an in- crease in money. Real wealth is created by the production of goods and services. Money is only a measure of wealth. A too- rapid increase in money circulation increases in- flation; an increase in wealth curbs inflation ... helping to stabilize the American dollar and meaning a gradual rise in, the American standard of living ... you can BANK on it! cJt00o [il CANTON. MO. THURSDAY, OCT. 19, 1978 invested by Missouri growers. And third, those growers who do not with to invest their funds in this manner may have their checkoff refund- ed." Missouri soybean growers who wish to vote in the late January soybean referendum must first register to vote at their county ASCS office. The registration period will be held from Nov. 27 to Jan. 5. Soybean referendum ballots will be mailed only to those producers who have register- ed between Nov. 27 and Jan. 5. "This referendum is a very important issue to the profits of Missouri soybean produc- ers," Haggard said. "Because of this, I hope every Missouri grower will register ,and vote." Entertainment by the Highland Swing Band TICKETS $5.00 Sponsored by the Lewis County Democrat Central CommnHee. Advance tickets may be purchased from the following Ticket Chairman Phone Robert Merrell ............. 767.5370 Estil Fretwell .............. 767-5372 Nell Little .................. 767-5349 Mr. & Mrs. Stanlipy Wilson .288-5541 Mr. & Mrs. Sam Plant ..... 497-2688 Mr. & Mrs. Robert Cary .... 288-5288 Bill Murphy ................ 853-4582 Donnie Goings ............. 494-3575 Marsha Allison ............. 853-2393 Anna Nrgret Carter ...... 478-3559 Champ Todd ............... 655-2225 Pearl Ritter ............ 816-278-3116 Betty Lillard ............... 655-2273 Beverly Kern .............. 494-3302 Carol Rich ................. 288-5700 Anqu sifts, refinished printer, trays, panrs *lle,  g  :in dolls, .amity frar.ny Iw'i wooden ware, primitiveS, mlrmlvre frames, lectibl, I' PHONE 314- 769- 3890 303 W. Jefferson Palmyra, PALMYRA LIV AUCTION V2 mile south of Palmyra, M0. on Highway 61 AUCTION EVERY MONDA Fat Butcher 10:30 a.m. 'sow, ,nd Large demand for quality feeder pigs. selli to 1000 head o week. We are becoming concerned about sanitation for both the h,ver. For help in your feeder pig buying or selling call RUSTY ROTHWEILER 314-478-3548 or 314-769- 5 PACKER BUYERS Stacker, 1:30 p.m. c..,.. Terrific demand Cows and Bulb for good condition Andy Anderson Dwight Phone 314.769.3058 Phone 3 00hcje 600)ur A well-planned advertising program gets resultsl Our creative ad staff will join forces to turn your selling message into innovative ads that get re- sults. Call, and let's discuss your best strategyl lmmmmmnmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm | SPECIAL CATTLE i SALE AT :KAHOKA SALE COM a. IHOI, MISSOURI " Wednesday, October, 25, 19711 : Starhiig" on Cattle at 1 P.M. If you have cattle to sell them to tins sale. All cattle sold in order recieved. This sale will be advertised over a large area. i For. further mformahon ca//Sale Barn 816.727.3954 Btll Ryan 314.288.$76 ! - Jerry Miller mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm