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October 26, 1978     Press-News Journal
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October 26, 1978
 

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& Merchants Bank to note 75th year tal stock was to be $10,0 with a par value of $100 each. The request was for the board to consist of five members. The request for a state charter was signed on Nov. 10, 1903, and permission was granted by the Division of Finance on Dec. 21, 1903. The bank was given the State Bank Number of 1234, an unusual number that it has held since it was established. Most of the early records of the institution were destroyed by the flood of 1973, although it is known that the first directors of the bank were Boardman N. Crouch, Samuel G. Lewis, Abner Bozarth, Silvester M. Finley and George R. Davis. The bank was originally located across the street from its present location in the three-story brick building which now houses the Eagle Cafe. Following a fire which destroyed a large building at the bank's present location, a new structure was built and the bank moved into its present home in 1914. Over the years many improvements and additions have been added to the building, which and Mer- LaGrange, in since 1903. in Lewis did not close will anniversary 3. will be held f Nov. 3, during hours, with and souvenirs visitors. 1903, fourteen a corpora- as Farmers Bank of La- of capi- N AND THE LEWIS COUNTY THURSDAY, OCT. 26, 1978 Copy weekend at administration building re- cently placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The parade of campus and off-campus entries will begin at 10 am. and wind through Canton's downtown district. Sixteen marching bands from Missouri and Illinois have confirmed their intention to participate. Trophies for the top-rated floats and bands will be presented at half-time of the 1:30 homecoming football game on campus against Peru State (Nebr.) College. The winning bands are expected to perform at half- time, following presentation of Culver-Stockton's student homecoming king, queen, and court. Students cast ballots to elect their royalty Monday and will crown them at their annual homecoming dance Friday night in the Gladys Crown Student Center. characters, and children the streets with the parade are expected day's events at 9 a.m. with of new flags campus near the college's Part of the front wall of the old pool hall building on Lewis Street in Canton is pulled downers razing efforts by Homer Construction Co. reach the finishing stages. The building was one of the last of the cast-iron front pillared buildings in the Canton business district. razed Total collapse of the front of the building is seen in this down view from the back of the pool hall building. Cables were used to pull remainder of front wall down. Plans for the location have not been announced by the owners, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Capps. now offers a drive-in banking window. {m July 24, 1944, a request was made to the Division of Finance to increase the capital stock from $25,000 to $50,000, and on Feb. 20, 1976, permission was again granted by the Commissioner of Finance to increase the capital stock from $50,000 to $100,000. In 1953 the bank observed its 50th anniversary, and had at that time total assets of $1,086,000. Today the totel assets of the bank total $5,775,000. Present directors of the bank are Robert S. Maiers, Harold Schaffer, Viola Tie- mann, George Nichols and Raymond GMligher. Officers are Robert S. Maiers, president; Raymond Galligher, executive vice president; George Nichols, vice president; Jenny Mur- phy, assistant vice president; Irma L. Weisemann, cashier; Alice L. Solter, assistant cashier; and Kay Redmon and Hazel Martin, bookkeepers. Culver-Stockton Before the game, the 160- member marching band from Francis Howell High School in St. Charles, will perform a specialty routine and the national anthem. The band is directed by Culver-Stockton alumnus Bert Stanley, who formerly directed bands in the Canton public school system. Five Culver-Stockton alumni will be honored as part of the weekend's activities, several groups will celebrate class reunions, and a capacity crowd is expected for the alumni party at the Golden' Eagle Dinner Theatre Satur- day night. Director of alumni affairs, Mrs. Jan Bran, said 220 reservations had been receiv- ed as of Monday for the alumni party. The theatre's capacity is 250 persons. "We're expecting a good turnout for all of Saturday's events, and we hope everyone, whether they are Culver- Stockton alumni or not, will turn out to see the parade and afternoon football game," said Mrs. Bran. "The parade is really a family affair that children, especially, will enjoy and we hope a lot of people will show up to support our team Saturday afternoon." The five alumni to be honored are Chester Calvert, a retired educator from Sbelbina; Robert Copper, di- rector of business information and analysis for the Pillsbury Co., Minneapolis, Minn.; Charles Davoli, director of criminal justice planning, state of Florida; Dorothy Hopkins Schaad, retired Uni- tarian Church minister, Chi- cago; and Sara Dunning Zenge, an education admini- strator, Hagerstown, Md. Kiwanis conte00st and ..... parade on Halloween The annual Halloween cos-sixth grades. There is no tume contest and parade entry fee for the participants. sponsored by the Canton Kiwanis Club will be held Tuesday, Oct. 31, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the Canton High School old gymnasium. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three entrants in each category judged in the annual event. In addition, apple and candy treats will be given to each person entering the competition. The categories for the costume judging will be: pre-school, kindergarten, first and second grade, third and fourth grade, and fifth and Anyone wishing to enter the contest is asked to appear in their costume at the old school gym before 7:30 p.m. Judges for this year's contest are Mr. and Mrs. Steve Waters and Tim Black- more. The public is invited to attend the contest and parade. Admission is free of charge. The annual Halloween con- test is a community project sponsored by the Canton Kiwanis Club for the youth" of the area. Countywide-------00 LaGrange Lion's fish fry Nov. 4 The LaGrange Lion's Club a.m. and continue through 2 will hold their annual fish fry p.m. at the Legion Hall Saturday, The public is invited. Nov. 4. Serving will start at 11 Trick or Treat for UNICEF Sun. Trick or Treat for U.N.I.-,- C.E.F. will be sponsored by Canton Civic Club, MFWC, on Sunday afternoon, Oct. 29, from 3 to 5 p.m. Be ready with a contribution to a high school student with proper identifica- tion who will call house-to- house. You can help U.N.I.C.E.F. help needy children in many ways by giving. Food sale for Lewistown Depot The fund raising committee for the Lewistown Depot will sponsor a baked food sale and bazaar. Tuesday, Nov. 7 at the Grange Building, first build- mg north of the bank in Lewistown. beginning at 8:30 a.m. Donations of items will be accepted from anyone in- terested. Please contact Ruth Keppner, Glessie Reese or Janice Van Meter. Volkmer to be in Canton parade Harold L. Volkmer, Demo- be participating in the Culver- cratic candidate for re-oleo- Stockton Homecoming Parade tion to a second term as beginning at 10 a.m. After the Congressman for the Ninth parade he will be at the District, will be in Lewis Democratic Headquarters County on Saturday, Oct. 28, from 11 to 11:30 a.m. on North stopping in Canton. will 4th Street. Congressman Volkmer " Club to sponsor reception, offer rides The Lewis County Women's The Club is also offering Democrat Club will sponsor a rides to anyone who would reception for candidates, with like to attend the Democrat free coffee and cookies ira- Dinner and Rally this evening, mediately following the home- Thursday, at Highland High coming parade in Canton School. Those who wish a ride Saturday, at the Democrat should call 288-5700, 288-3496, headquarters on North 4th 288-5288, or 767-5225. Street. ;3.J T ' , " O,IRMAN' NEWS '[L DEPT. UONUOUTi, ILL 61462 t Plan event k Directors of the Farmers and Merchants Bank of LaGrange met Monday to make plans for their 75th anniversary. Front row, left to right, are Harold Schaffer, Viola Tiemann, and Robert S. Maiers. Second row, George Nichols and Raymond Galligher. Bid opening date for lock Finances on C.1 kevel rails is changed The bid opening for the installation of traveling kevel rails at Lock No. 16 at Muscatine; Lock No. 17, north of New Boston, Ill; and at Lock 20 at Canton, has been shifted from November 9 to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 21, the Rook Island District of the US Army Corps of Engineers has announced. The invitation for bids for this project, originally sched- uled to be issued on Oct. I0, was actually issued on Friday, Oct. 20, and the Corps of Engineers normally allows a period of at least 30 days for private contractors to prepare their bids. The traveling kevel rail, which keeps the first section of upbound barges against the upper land guidewall of the Upper Mississippi River navi, gation locks during double lockings, consists of a steel rail, which is mounted on top of the upper guidewall of the locks. Many of the towboats now traveling on the Upper Missis- sippi River push up to 15 barge tows, which require double lockings to pass through the 600-foot-long locks on the Upper Mississippi River. Two haulage units, used at all locks but the 1200-foot-long Lock 19 when it is not needed, pull the first section of barges out of the lock chamber. A line is then attached from the barges to a bitt, which is attached to the traveling kevel rail and the barges are then moved along the rail to a point above the lock. This has resulted in greater safety and has also reduced the time for all double lockings. Traveling kevel rails have already been installed and are In operattoff at Lock 'I2" a[ Bellevue, Ia.; Lock 18, north of Burlington; Lock 21 at Quincy; and at Lock 22 at Saverton. construction announced Thurman L. WilieR, super- intendent of the Lewis County C-I School District, has releas- ed the following financial statement on the construction on Shell "C" at Highland high school. This statement in- cludes money contributed as well as money spent from school funds. Supt. Willett pointed out that $128,000 was saved by this method of construction over bonded indebtedness. The tot- al expenses to date on the completion of Shell "C" is $75,453. Receipts from patrons, a carnival, and volleyball tour- ney were $15,270.61, with Mr. Murphy's collections adding $2,186.00, for a total of $17,456.61. Disbursements were: from District Funds, $58,157.27; *Shell "c,' F:tma, Is,7o.sl; .... nd Mr. Murphy's Fund, $2,025.12; for a total of disbursements .of $75,453.00. HHS grid coach was pro By Dan Steinbeck Almost every child dreams of playing professional sports of some kind -- whether baseball, basketball, tennis or what have you. For Highland football coach David Long, this dream became a reality. Dave Long hails from Cedar Rapids, Ia., and had played college football for the Uni- versity of Iowa, where he was named All-American. In 1965, he was drafted in the third round of the professional football players draft by the St. Louis Cardinals, for the 1966 season. Between the years of 1966-69 he played defensive end with the Cardinals, whose home is Busch Stadium and then was traded to the New Orleans Saints where he played the same position he played while with the Cardinals. In 1973 he Perhaps one of the most memorable games David Long played in was the November 8, 1970, game, New Orleans vs. Detroit. (True football buffs may already recognize this date.) This game, as were all other home New Orleans games, was played in Tulane Sta- dium. This game featured a field goal kicker On the last play of the game that booted a record 63 yard kick to beat the Detroit Lions 19-17. The field goal kicker was Tom Demp- sey, who ironically kicked the field goal with his right wooden foot, deformed since birth. "I helped block on the line on that play. It was also the first game that year that we won, so it was a special game," Long added. lett the professional game. Although he received many "It's a thrill to play (as a honors and awards, he never professional player). It's the made all-pro. The 6'4" football top.of the line. I just happened coach at Highland high school to be lucky enough to have a big body (6'4"-255 lbs.) and   could play ball," the Highland coach said. Some of the reasons that David Long decided to end his pro football career was a bad ti  knee, age, and he wasn't as quick as he started out. "I decided before I went t 4 : pro, that if I couldn't do the job, I'd just get out and not ; bounce around the league." l  :L  He cited an example of a baseball herq of his as a youth that would keep skipping  teams, and not get ii]i: around the out when he should have. Long said that there were aspects of both teams that he i enjoyed. He noted that while with the Cardinals, they had ,-.-" several wins and he had been i ,, awarded the Golden Helmet Award, among others, which is given by the St. Louis .... Cardinals for an outstanding i player of the week. i He said that New Orleans is : a "super-duper city" and tha[ , the fans there are the best anywhere. He also enjoyed the historical interest of the southern Louisiana city, and added that history was his Coach David Long main academic interest. feels he should have been selected All-Pro, but he realized that he's been lucky to play professional football for seven years. "Football's been good to me in many ways. Since the age of 14, football has played some part of my life for every year except one or two." I'm grateful to football for a lot of things." After leaving football, he spent three years as a street cop in Jefferson Parrish, La. Long felt he wasn't getting anywhere in the law enforce- merit field. So around 1975 he went back to Iowa to visit his parents and visit a good friend that was a high school coach. It was around Christimas time of that year he decided to stay with football, but in a different perspective -- as a high school coach. Long spent some time in Quincy and wanted to find a (Continued on page 4b) II L II I I ll]ll Ill " J & Merchants Bank to note 75th year tal stock was to be $10,0 with a par value of $100 each. The request was for the board to consist of five members. The request for a state charter was signed on Nov. 10, 1903, and permission was granted by the Division of Finance on Dec. 21, 1903. The bank was given the State Bank Number of 1234, an unusual number that it has held since it was established. Most of the early records of the institution were destroyed by the flood of 1973, although it is known that the first directors of the bank were Boardman N. Crouch, Samuel G. Lewis, Abner Bozarth, Silvester M. Finley and George R. Davis. The bank was originally located across the street from its present location in the three-story brick building which now houses the Eagle Cafe. Following a fire which destroyed a large building at the bank's present location, a new structure was built and the bank moved into its present home in 1914. Over the years many improvements and additions have been added to the building, which and Mer- LaGrange, in since 1903. in Lewis did not close will anniversary 3. will be held f Nov. 3, during hours, with and souvenirs visitors. 1903, fourteen a corpora- as Farmers Bank of La- of capi- N AND THE LEWIS COUNTY THURSDAY, OCT. 26, 1978 Copy weekend at administration building re- cently placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The parade of campus and off-campus entries will begin at 10 am. and wind through Canton's downtown district. Sixteen marching bands from Missouri and Illinois have confirmed their intention to participate. Trophies for the top-rated floats and bands will be presented at half-time of the 1:30 homecoming football game on campus against Peru State (Nebr.) College. The winning bands are expected to perform at half- time, following presentation of Culver-Stockton's student homecoming king, queen, and court. Students cast ballots to elect their royalty Monday and will crown them at their annual homecoming dance Friday night in the Gladys Crown Student Center. characters, and children the streets with the parade are expected day's events at 9 a.m. with of new flags campus near the college's Part of the front wall of the old pool hall building on Lewis Street in Canton is pulled downers razing efforts by Homer Construction Co. reach the finishing stages. The building was one of the last of the cast-iron front pillared buildings in the Canton business district. razed Total collapse of the front of the building is seen in this down view from the back of the pool hall building. Cables were used to pull remainder of front wall down. Plans for the location have not been announced by the owners, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Capps. now offers a drive-in banking window. {m July 24, 1944, a request was made to the Division of Finance to increase the capital stock from $25,000 to $50,000, and on Feb. 20, 1976, permission was again granted by the Commissioner of Finance to increase the capital stock from $50,000 to $100,000. In 1953 the bank observed its 50th anniversary, and had at that time total assets of $1,086,000. Today the totel assets of the bank total $5,775,000. Present directors of the bank are Robert S. Maiers, Harold Schaffer, Viola Tie- mann, George Nichols and Raymond GMligher. Officers are Robert S. Maiers, president; Raymond Galligher, executive vice president; George Nichols, vice president; Jenny Mur- phy, assistant vice president; Irma L. Weisemann, cashier; Alice L. Solter, assistant cashier; and Kay Redmon and Hazel Martin, bookkeepers. Culver-Stockton Before the game, the 160- member marching band from Francis Howell High School in St. Charles, will perform a specialty routine and the national anthem. The band is directed by Culver-Stockton alumnus Bert Stanley, who formerly directed bands in the Canton public school system. Five Culver-Stockton alumni will be honored as part of the weekend's activities, several groups will celebrate class reunions, and a capacity crowd is expected for the alumni party at the Golden' Eagle Dinner Theatre Satur- day night. Director of alumni affairs, Mrs. Jan Bran, said 220 reservations had been receiv- ed as of Monday for the alumni party. The theatre's capacity is 250 persons. "We're expecting a good turnout for all of Saturday's events, and we hope everyone, whether they are Culver- Stockton alumni or not, will turn out to see the parade and afternoon football game," said Mrs. Bran. "The parade is really a family affair that children, especially, will enjoy and we hope a lot of people will show up to support our team Saturday afternoon." The five alumni to be honored are Chester Calvert, a retired educator from Sbelbina; Robert Copper, di- rector of business information and analysis for the Pillsbury Co., Minneapolis, Minn.; Charles Davoli, director of criminal justice planning, state of Florida; Dorothy Hopkins Schaad, retired Uni- tarian Church minister, Chi- cago; and Sara Dunning Zenge, an education admini- strator, Hagerstown, Md. Kiwanis conte00st and ..... parade on Halloween The annual Halloween cos-sixth grades. There is no tume contest and parade entry fee for the participants. sponsored by the Canton Kiwanis Club will be held Tuesday, Oct. 31, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the Canton High School old gymnasium. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three entrants in each category judged in the annual event. In addition, apple and candy treats will be given to each person entering the competition. The categories for the costume judging will be: pre-school, kindergarten, first and second grade, third and fourth grade, and fifth and Anyone wishing to enter the contest is asked to appear in their costume at the old school gym before 7:30 p.m. Judges for this year's contest are Mr. and Mrs. Steve Waters and Tim Black- more. The public is invited to attend the contest and parade. Admission is free of charge. The annual Halloween con- test is a community project sponsored by the Canton Kiwanis Club for the youth" of the area. Countywide-------00 LaGrange Lion's fish fry Nov. 4 The LaGrange Lion's Club a.m. and continue through 2 will hold their annual fish fry p.m. at the Legion Hall Saturday, The public is invited. Nov. 4. Serving will start at 11 Trick or Treat for UNICEF Sun. Trick or Treat for U.N.I.-,- C.E.F. will be sponsored by Canton Civic Club, MFWC, on Sunday afternoon, Oct. 29, from 3 to 5 p.m. Be ready with a contribution to a high school student with proper identifica- tion who will call house-to- house. You can help U.N.I.C.E.F. help needy children in many ways by giving. Food sale for Lewistown Depot The fund raising committee for the Lewistown Depot will sponsor a baked food sale and bazaar. Tuesday, Nov. 7 at the Grange Building, first build- mg north of the bank in Lewistown. beginning at 8:30 a.m. Donations of items will be accepted from anyone in- terested. Please contact Ruth Keppner, Glessie Reese or Janice Van Meter. Volkmer to be in Canton parade Harold L. Volkmer, Demo- be participating in the Culver- cratic candidate for re-oleo- Stockton Homecoming Parade tion to a second term as beginning at 10 a.m. After the Congressman for the Ninth parade he will be at the District, will be in Lewis Democratic Headquarters County on Saturday, Oct. 28, from 11 to 11:30 a.m. on North stopping in Canton. will 4th Street. Congressman Volkmer " Club to sponsor reception, offer rides The Lewis County Women's The Club is also offering Democrat Club will sponsor a rides to anyone who would reception for candidates, with like to attend the Democrat free coffee and cookies ira- Dinner and Rally this evening, mediately following the home- Thursday, at Highland High coming parade in Canton School. Those who wish a ride Saturday, at the Democrat should call 288-5700, 288-3496, headquarters on North 4th 288-5288, or 767-5225. Street. ;3.J T ' , " O,IRMAN' NEWS '[L DEPT. UONUOUTi, ILL 61462 t Plan event k Directors of the Farmers and Merchants Bank of LaGrange met Monday to make plans for their 75th anniversary. Front row, left to right, are Harold Schaffer, Viola Tiemann, and Robert S. Maiers. Second row, George Nichols and Raymond Galligher. Bid opening date for lock Finances on C.1 kevel rails is changed The bid opening for the installation of traveling kevel rails at Lock No. 16 at Muscatine; Lock No. 17, north of New Boston, Ill; and at Lock 20 at Canton, has been shifted from November 9 to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 21, the Rook Island District of the US Army Corps of Engineers has announced. The invitation for bids for this project, originally sched- uled to be issued on Oct. I0, was actually issued on Friday, Oct. 20, and the Corps of Engineers normally allows a period of at least 30 days for private contractors to prepare their bids. The traveling kevel rail, which keeps the first section of upbound barges against the upper land guidewall of the Upper Mississippi River navi, gation locks during double lockings, consists of a steel rail, which is mounted on top of the upper guidewall of the locks. Many of the towboats now traveling on the Upper Missis- sippi River push up to 15 barge tows, which require double lockings to pass through the 600-foot-long locks on the Upper Mississippi River. Two haulage units, used at all locks but the 1200-foot-long Lock 19 when it is not needed, pull the first section of barges out of the lock chamber. A line is then attached from the barges to a bitt, which is attached to the traveling kevel rail and the barges are then moved along the rail to a point above the lock. This has resulted in greater safety and has also reduced the time for all double lockings. Traveling kevel rails have already been installed and are In operattoff at Lock 'I2" a[ Bellevue, Ia.; Lock 18, north of Burlington; Lock 21 at Quincy; and at Lock 22 at Saverton. construction announced Thurman L. WilieR, super- intendent of the Lewis County C-I School District, has releas- ed the following financial statement on the construction on Shell "C" at Highland high school. This statement in- cludes money contributed as well as money spent from school funds. Supt. Willett pointed out that $128,000 was saved by this method of construction over bonded indebtedness. The tot- al expenses to date on the completion of Shell "C" is $75,453. Receipts from patrons, a carnival, and volleyball tour- ney were $15,270.61, with Mr. Murphy's collections adding $2,186.00, for a total of $17,456.61. Disbursements were: from District Funds, $58,157.27; *Shell "c,' F:tma, Is,7o.sl; .... nd Mr. Murphy's Fund, $2,025.12; for a total of disbursements .of $75,453.00. HHS grid coach was pro By Dan Steinbeck Almost every child dreams of playing professional sports of some kind -- whether baseball, basketball, tennis or what have you. For Highland football coach David Long, this dream became a reality. Dave Long hails from Cedar Rapids, Ia., and had played college football for the Uni- versity of Iowa, where he was named All-American. In 1965, he was drafted in the third round of the professional football players draft by the St. Louis Cardinals, for the 1966 season. Between the years of 1966-69 he played defensive end with the Cardinals, whose home is Busch Stadium and then was traded to the New Orleans Saints where he played the same position he played while with the Cardinals. In 1973 he Perhaps one of the most memorable games David Long played in was the November 8, 1970, game, New Orleans vs. Detroit. (True football buffs may already recognize this date.) This game, as were all other home New Orleans games, was played in Tulane Sta- dium. This game featured a field goal kicker On the last play of the game that booted a record 63 yard kick to beat the Detroit Lions 19-17. The field goal kicker was Tom Demp- sey, who ironically kicked the field goal with his right wooden foot, deformed since birth. "I helped block on the line on that play. It was also the first game that year that we won, so it was a special game," Long added. lett the professional game. Although he received many "It's a thrill to play (as a honors and awards, he never professional player). It's the made all-pro. The 6'4" football top.of the line. I just happened coach at Highland high school to be lucky enough to have a big body (6'4"-255 lbs.) and   could play ball," the Highland coach said. Some of the reasons that David Long decided to end his pro football career was a bad ti  knee, age, and he wasn't as quick as he started out. "I decided before I went t 4 : pro, that if I couldn't do the job, I'd just get out and not ; bounce around the league." l  :L  He cited an example of a baseball herq of his as a youth that would keep skipping  teams, and not get ii]i: around the out when he should have. Long said that there were aspects of both teams that he i enjoyed. He noted that while with the Cardinals, they had ,-.-" several wins and he had been i ,, awarded the Golden Helmet Award, among others, which is given by the St. Louis .... Cardinals for an outstanding i player of the week. i He said that New Orleans is : a "super-duper city" and tha[ , the fans there are the best anywhere. He also enjoyed the historical interest of the southern Louisiana city, and added that history was his Coach David Long main academic interest. feels he should have been selected All-Pro, but he realized that he's been lucky to play professional football for seven years. "Football's been good to me in many ways. Since the age of 14, football has played some part of my life for every year except one or two." I'm grateful to football for a lot of things." After leaving football, he spent three years as a street cop in Jefferson Parrish, La. Long felt he wasn't getting anywhere in the law enforce- merit field. So around 1975 he went back to Iowa to visit his parents and visit a good friend that was a high school coach. It was around Christimas time of that year he decided to stay with football, but in a different perspective -- as a high school coach. Long spent some time in Quincy and wanted to find a (Continued on page 4b) II L II I I ll]ll Ill " J