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Canton, Missouri
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October 26, 1978     Press-News Journal
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October 26, 1978
 

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than color TV recall a more When the trees in their bright red. It is really t, drive around and see what the green hills Of the sumac, maples,  deep greens of the road patches by a scenic ! Years, summer fall rains, this colorful the weather this year was just right for the predicted fall spectacle. You don't have to drive to the Ozarks, or to New England to enjoy the wonders Of fall this year. Just look in your own back yard. And it would lift the spirits Of us all, if we would take the time to see and enjoy this natural phenonenon. The tropical climes can have their palm trees and exotic foliage. They've only got the same scenery year 'round. Here in Missouri, we can watch the ever-changing panorama d season, with an occasional fantastic exhibition like we are currently enjoy- ing. rnaill00x are being certain of natural re- are wasting use of its its older ! million people or older in are out of find a job, job market prejudice Prejudices it when corn- Studies workers 40 tend to performance shorter period those hired 0f20. days lost per all reasons increases. In above 50 lost fewer rs than group below 45 to 64 year only half as jobs as year old have a and of continued the employer hired, so older workers savings reduced lower turn- ed from our readers Time doesn't diminish the eagerness to work, so when it comes to the American work- er, we should remember that ability is ageless. Sue Nichols Job Development Specialist Missouri Green Thumb To the Editor: I have examined both sides of the Amendment 23 (the "right-to-work" proposal) and I feel it is bad for the employee, the employer and for the state. Many of the backers of Amendment 23 feel as though unison members themselves are opposed to paying dues and belonging to unions. On the contrary, most of them are eager to do so, for without the union they have no freedom of choice in collective bargaining. Before organized labor, employers held the upper hand over all workers. This is the first move to destroy organized labor. But keep in mind one important fact: Union members are not only employees, they are also customers. The gains organiz- ed labor win at the bargaining table contribute not only to the financial welfare of union members, but to the growth and prosperity of the entire state. Let's leave labor unions and other worthy organizations to operate democratically, and keep our wonderful country free. Sincerely, Joe Schutte LaGrange, Mo. Haman Menrs A II II high voter turnout each to have a people. drawn so population is The so that the is over 140,000 figure as Election were cast of the 18th This dis- high percent- voters a ballot, to 75 per the same Of registered go to the tradi, auch lower votes cast, voD Presidential year may since in races the the eight a vote of the much through- ,/l lmve bern impressed by the abnormally large number of newly regis- tered voters in each county. The County Clerks have been virtually unanimous in their projections for a high voter turnout on Nov. 7. I am very pleased to see this increase in voter registra-" tion and to hear from local officials that they expect a busy election day. I firmly believe in our elective process and am proud to see more of our citizens becoming involv- ed in it. The freedom to vote for candidates, locally and statewide, as well as on proposed amendments to Mis- seuri's Constitution, is the basic right of each citizen. To learn that more and more citizens are taking part in the voting process is gratifying. On Nov. 7th, make certain you vote. Cast your ballot, exercise that right, one that is takEm for granted by so many and would be treasured more than we can imagine by millions of the world's people. SACKWARD ". " eLANc00z ", . By Pearl Plank . OoOOoeOoepooOOOoOOIooIollaaol@laeOooOOooDOoO@oOOBo@@O 20 YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News October 30, 1958 Over 100 people attended the Kiwanis Ladies Night pro- gram in the dining rooms at Culver-Stockton Tuesday eve- ning. George Nichols, presi- dent, presided, and then turned the meeting over to J Andy Zenge, Jr., who acted as master of ceremonies. The event also celebrated the 33rd birthday of the club. Two charter members, Dr. C. S. Todd and Dr. P. W. Jennings, were introduced. The special program for the evening was presented by Mr. Gillamwat- era of the Haeger Potteries of Macomb. arrangements completed and many details solved, the Homecoming committee, un- der the chairmanship of Prof. George L. Abernaltry, an- nounces a program designed to give Culver-Stockton its best alumni week end in its history. New college flags of blue and white will be on display downtown; the band has been outfitted with new uniforms, including those for a drum major and a baton twirler; and the late frost will have prepared an unsurpass- able view of brightly painted woods from the Hilltop and football field. Canton State Bank is one of the local institutions that comes under the regulations of the Wagner Labor Law. Employees will be on a Fred Helsabeck, Jr., has been named to the national publication, Who's Who Among Students in Colleges 44-hour week. Because of and Uniyersities. Helsabeck is shorter working hours it will a senior at Lunchburg Col- be necessary for the bank to close an hour earlier -- at 3 lege, Lynchburg, Va. m The Lewis County Journal October 30, 1958 C. A. (Cap) Steffen, 80, noted farmer of near Steffen- ville and former judge of the Southern District of Lewis County, died Sunday, Oct. 26, in his home following a long illness. The Lewis County National Farmers Organization held its regular monthly meeting in the court house at Monticello with a good number attending. Election of officers for the coming year was held and those taking office were: Grover A. Gamm, chairman; A. D. Taylor, vice chairman; George Seeber, secretary; Roy Hayden, treasurer; re- porter, Viola Gamin; director of the 9th District, Buzz Spurgeon. At the 9th District meeting at Paris, Mo., Oct. 3, William Qmnn was elect, treasurer for this district. This newspaper has never attempted to tell anyone how to vote. Only a few times in nearly 20 years has it even made any suggestions. How- ever, we feel so strongly about the "Branch Banking" amendment, which will be presented to you on a separate ballot at the Nov. 4 election, that we are breaking one of our policy rules and urging you to vote "No" on this ballot. LaGrange Methodist Church will hold its third annual God's Portion Sale and dinner ,ov. 1. All of the receipts of this sale will go toward the improvements now in pro- gress on the church. This includes new furnace, com- plete redecorating, basement ceiling, new platform in front of the church and carpeting. 40 YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News October 27, 1938 J. B. Dick, 72, died Wednes- day of last week in a hospital at Beardstown. He married Effie M. Condit "in 1909. Surviving him are his widow -and two brothers. Mr. Dick traveled for 35 years for the Hastings Industrial Company of Chicago. Until moving with his wife to Beardstown a few months ago, he was a resident of Canton. As mentioned before the Town of Canton is having the Canton House razed to make way for progress. The new post office building will oc- cupy the Central Park site, and the hotel site will be used for the park. The Canton House, for years known as the Jefferson Hotel, was, in lgg'/, the most popular small town hotel in this section. Two dollars a day was the usual charge for the rooms and a dollar a day for meals. No running water was available, as that was the day of bowl and pitcher. The Jefferson Hotel had been in existence previous to 1887, however, and was then known as the Captain Downs house because Captain Downs, an uncle of William Downs, managed the establishment. The Grand Leader Phar- macy, Mrs. A. R. Detwiler, proprietor, has installed the largest and most eleborate fountain in Canton. With most of the general p.m. instead of 4 p.m. -- in order that book work may be done. Funeral services for the Rev. Raymond M. Hutchison, 45, pastor of the New London Christian church, were held Saturday. The Rev. Hutchison was a graduate of Culver- Stockton College and had been in the ministry since 1919. He is survived by his mother; his widow; a daughter, Jose- phine; and two sons, Bobby and Dickey. both boys were laid to rest in Liberty cemetery Friday. _ Deer Ridge Died: Clarence Chance, a farmer near Ewing, died Wednesday from an attack of influenza. 90 YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal October 26, 1888 J. T. Glares has leased the girst mill at Williamstown and attached his thrasher engine to it and is grinding wheat and COrn. The dwelling of Pat Tooey, three miles west of Monticel- lo, was burned Wednesday morning. The property was insured for $600. The Canton Press and News have made arrangements to receive the election returns on Tuesday night, Nov. 6. The bulletins will be read from the stage of the Opera House every 15 or 20 minutes. All of the doubtful states will be heard from as far as possible that night. Bank site The honor roll for the first six weeks is larger than usual. For seniors: Mamie Boul- ware, Wilma Bertram, Gay- nell Hagen, Mary Adaline Perry, Howard Rosenthal, Jimmy Yager, John Wills. Honorable mention: Ferne Brinkley and Dorothy Thomp- kins. Mrs. Ed Morton, S1, died at her home near Canton on Oct. I First home for F & M Bank. 21. " . : : The Lewis County Journal October 25, 1928 Mrs. Elizabeth Bronestine, 79, heard and answered her Saviour's summons at her home in Lewistown on Oct. 21. James T. Phillips of Ewing, veteran leader of the Missouri State Grange, was again chosen to head that organiza- tion at the meeting in Jefferson City, last week for the ensuing two years. 60 YEARS AGO The Levis County Journal October 25, 1918 The epidemic of influenza in the camps seems to be under control at least in the South. The board received word to send 36 men to Fort Worth, Tex., Monday. Our school was ordered closed since last Friday. Hazel Grove All of the schools are closed for an indefinite length of time on account of the influenza. Durham We have recently read that the 33rd Division had gone "over the top" in France and came out victorious. We have several boys in that Division: Arthur Marvin, Edgar Cram- mer, Artie Leake, Emery and Harold Ewing, who have at one time claimed Durham for their home, are members of the 33rd. A new program for public eating places effective Oct. 21. Neither bread nor sugar may be served unless the guests request it. When bread and butter is asked for it must not be put upon the table until the first course is served. This is to do away with the pre-war custom of idly consuming bread while waiting for the first course to come. If sugar is requested, not more than one teaspoonful may be served to one person. News reached this-place Thursday that two sons of the late James Lasswell, who formerly lived north of town, Present building in 1920 j The DeCoster Report... BY RICHARD DegOS00, FIRST DISTRICT REPRESENTA1NE Info on commerce The amount of general information that comes across the desk of an elected official is beyond the capacity of any one person to consume and digest. Nevertheless, in grasp- ing bits and pieces here and there and now and then one they are doing, .seldom, if ever, indicating what the actual .cost is. In a recent issue I picked up a couple of items that I feel are worth passing on. Accord- ing to "Update" 10 years ago 23 per cent of the nation's comes up with a wealth of labor force belonged to information that stimulates unions. Now 19.4 per cent are thought and broadens ones union members -- salary general understanding of what increases in the U.S. in 1978 is going on. One of the more will result in a $10 billion valuable pieces of information increase in federal income tax had died, victims of Spanish that I receive on a regular revenues. A great part of the " influenza. Both boys were basis is "CID Update". It is increase coming from the working in Quincy and when their mother received the new of their illness, one of them was moved home where he died and the other one died in a hospital. The remains of put out by the Missouri taxpayers moving into a Division of Commerce and higher rate bracket. --State Industrial Development. Like Government in Missouri is most such publications, a good increasing its spending at deal of it's contents is devoted about the same rate as the to telling you what a good job personal income in the state is YESYERYE00R'5 PIEY[IRE5 A disastrous fire destroyed a business building across from the Farmers and Merchants Bank building in 1911. The site was later purchased by the bank, and the present building constructed and occupied in 1914. Note merchandise rescued from the fire stacked in foreground. Three-story brick building, now occupied by the Eagle Care in LOrnnge, was' first home of/he Farmers amd Merchants Bank of LaGrange. This photo, taken about 1920, shows the present building, surrounded by riders on horseback. Photos were provided by LaGrange Branch of Northeast Missouri Library, from old photo album in the library's collection. rising. Nationally, however, take the time to come to states are "spending" 25 per Jefferson City and appear at a cent more than their income, hearing of our committee on Following no doubt the ex- Aministrative Rules. I feel ample of the Federal Govern- confident that his appearance ment. will help us in improving state The unreality of state lines is illuminated by an item indicating that Motorola is expanding in Jasper County (Mo.) with 250 new jobs there, 300 miles from us. This so soon after many of our people lost their jobs when Motorola moved out of Quincy. On balance this is a big gain for Missouri, but that is little consolation to those Missouri- ans in Northeast Missouri who lost their jobs as a result of the switch. We've mentioned before the amount of time that govern- meat officials and employees spend going to one another's meetings. Last week the State Mental Health Association met in St, Louis the same day that the State Mental Retar- dation Association met in Columbia. We were happy to have Chester Smith, a 1st District government. SOCIAL-------- SECURITY '* TIPS HELEN A. BEEDLEm,,m. q:My husband and I were married for only three months when he had a heart attack and died. I understand that we were not married long enough for me to receive widow's benefits. Is there any benefit I can receive on his record? A: Yes, you could possibly be eligible for the lump sum ...... death payment if you and your busband were living in . the same household at the time of his death. There is no. duration of merchant from Wyaconda, quirement for than color TV recall a more When the trees in their bright red. It is really t, drive around and see what the green hills Of the sumac, maples,  deep greens of the road patches by a scenic ! Years, summer fall rains, this colorful the weather this year was just right for the predicted fall spectacle. You don't have to drive to the Ozarks, or to New England to enjoy the wonders Of fall this year. Just look in your own back yard. And it would lift the spirits Of us all, if we would take the time to see and enjoy this natural phenonenon. The tropical climes can have their palm trees and exotic foliage. They've only got the same scenery year 'round. Here in Missouri, we can watch the ever-changing panorama d season, with an occasional fantastic exhibition like we are currently enjoy- ing. rnaill00x are being certain of natural re- are wasting use of its its older ! million people or older in are out of find a job, job market prejudice Prejudices it when corn- Studies workers 40 tend to performance shorter period those hired 0f20. days lost per all reasons increases. In above 50 lost fewer rs than group below 45 to 64 year only half as jobs as year old have a and of continued the employer hired, so older workers savings reduced lower turn- ed from our readers Time doesn't diminish the eagerness to work, so when it comes to the American work- er, we should remember that ability is ageless. Sue Nichols Job Development Specialist Missouri Green Thumb To the Editor: I have examined both sides of the Amendment 23 (the "right-to-work" proposal) and I feel it is bad for the employee, the employer and for the state. Many of the backers of Amendment 23 feel as though unison members themselves are opposed to paying dues and belonging to unions. On the contrary, most of them are eager to do so, for without the union they have no freedom of choice in collective bargaining. Before organized labor, employers held the upper hand over all workers. This is the first move to destroy organized labor. But keep in mind one important fact: Union members are not only employees, they are also customers. The gains organiz- ed labor win at the bargaining table contribute not only to the financial welfare of union members, but to the growth and prosperity of the entire state. Let's leave labor unions and other worthy organizations to operate democratically, and keep our wonderful country free. Sincerely, Joe Schutte LaGrange, Mo. Haman Menrs A II II high voter turnout each to have a people. drawn so population is The so that the is over 140,000 figure as Election were cast of the 18th This dis- high percent- voters a ballot, to 75 per the same Of registered go to the tradi, auch lower votes cast, voD Presidential year may since in races the the eight a vote of the much through- ,/l lmve bern impressed by the abnormally large number of newly regis- tered voters in each county. The County Clerks have been virtually unanimous in their projections for a high voter turnout on Nov. 7. I am very pleased to see this increase in voter registra-" tion and to hear from local officials that they expect a busy election day. I firmly believe in our elective process and am proud to see more of our citizens becoming involv- ed in it. The freedom to vote for candidates, locally and statewide, as well as on proposed amendments to Mis- seuri's Constitution, is the basic right of each citizen. To learn that more and more citizens are taking part in the voting process is gratifying. On Nov. 7th, make certain you vote. Cast your ballot, exercise that right, one that is takEm for granted by so many and would be treasured more than we can imagine by millions of the world's people. SACKWARD ". " eLANc00z ", . By Pearl Plank . OoOOoeOoepooOOOoOOIooIollaaol@laeOooOOooDOoO@oOOBo@@O 20 YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News October 30, 1958 Over 100 people attended the Kiwanis Ladies Night pro- gram in the dining rooms at Culver-Stockton Tuesday eve- ning. George Nichols, presi- dent, presided, and then turned the meeting over to J Andy Zenge, Jr., who acted as master of ceremonies. The event also celebrated the 33rd birthday of the club. Two charter members, Dr. C. S. Todd and Dr. P. W. Jennings, were introduced. The special program for the evening was presented by Mr. Gillamwat- era of the Haeger Potteries of Macomb. arrangements completed and many details solved, the Homecoming committee, un- der the chairmanship of Prof. George L. Abernaltry, an- nounces a program designed to give Culver-Stockton its best alumni week end in its history. New college flags of blue and white will be on display downtown; the band has been outfitted with new uniforms, including those for a drum major and a baton twirler; and the late frost will have prepared an unsurpass- able view of brightly painted woods from the Hilltop and football field. Canton State Bank is one of the local institutions that comes under the regulations of the Wagner Labor Law. Employees will be on a Fred Helsabeck, Jr., has been named to the national publication, Who's Who Among Students in Colleges 44-hour week. Because of and Uniyersities. Helsabeck is shorter working hours it will a senior at Lunchburg Col- be necessary for the bank to close an hour earlier -- at 3 lege, Lynchburg, Va. m The Lewis County Journal October 30, 1958 C. A. (Cap) Steffen, 80, noted farmer of near Steffen- ville and former judge of the Southern District of Lewis County, died Sunday, Oct. 26, in his home following a long illness. The Lewis County National Farmers Organization held its regular monthly meeting in the court house at Monticello with a good number attending. Election of officers for the coming year was held and those taking office were: Grover A. Gamm, chairman; A. D. Taylor, vice chairman; George Seeber, secretary; Roy Hayden, treasurer; re- porter, Viola Gamin; director of the 9th District, Buzz Spurgeon. At the 9th District meeting at Paris, Mo., Oct. 3, William Qmnn was elect, treasurer for this district. This newspaper has never attempted to tell anyone how to vote. Only a few times in nearly 20 years has it even made any suggestions. How- ever, we feel so strongly about the "Branch Banking" amendment, which will be presented to you on a separate ballot at the Nov. 4 election, that we are breaking one of our policy rules and urging you to vote "No" on this ballot. LaGrange Methodist Church will hold its third annual God's Portion Sale and dinner ,ov. 1. All of the receipts of this sale will go toward the improvements now in pro- gress on the church. This includes new furnace, com- plete redecorating, basement ceiling, new platform in front of the church and carpeting. 40 YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News October 27, 1938 J. B. Dick, 72, died Wednes- day of last week in a hospital at Beardstown. He married Effie M. Condit "in 1909. Surviving him are his widow -and two brothers. Mr. Dick traveled for 35 years for the Hastings Industrial Company of Chicago. Until moving with his wife to Beardstown a few months ago, he was a resident of Canton. As mentioned before the Town of Canton is having the Canton House razed to make way for progress. The new post office building will oc- cupy the Central Park site, and the hotel site will be used for the park. The Canton House, for years known as the Jefferson Hotel, was, in lgg'/, the most popular small town hotel in this section. Two dollars a day was the usual charge for the rooms and a dollar a day for meals. No running water was available, as that was the day of bowl and pitcher. The Jefferson Hotel had been in existence previous to 1887, however, and was then known as the Captain Downs house because Captain Downs, an uncle of William Downs, managed the establishment. The Grand Leader Phar- macy, Mrs. A. R. Detwiler, proprietor, has installed the largest and most eleborate fountain in Canton. With most of the general p.m. instead of 4 p.m. -- in order that book work may be done. Funeral services for the Rev. Raymond M. Hutchison, 45, pastor of the New London Christian church, were held Saturday. The Rev. Hutchison was a graduate of Culver- Stockton College and had been in the ministry since 1919. He is survived by his mother; his widow; a daughter, Jose- phine; and two sons, Bobby and Dickey. both boys were laid to rest in Liberty cemetery Friday. _ Deer Ridge Died: Clarence Chance, a farmer near Ewing, died Wednesday from an attack of influenza. 90 YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal October 26, 1888 J. T. Glares has leased the girst mill at Williamstown and attached his thrasher engine to it and is grinding wheat and COrn. The dwelling of Pat Tooey, three miles west of Monticel- lo, was burned Wednesday morning. The property was insured for $600. The Canton Press and News have made arrangements to receive the election returns on Tuesday night, Nov. 6. The bulletins will be read from the stage of the Opera House every 15 or 20 minutes. All of the doubtful states will be heard from as far as possible that night. Bank site The honor roll for the first six weeks is larger than usual. For seniors: Mamie Boul- ware, Wilma Bertram, Gay- nell Hagen, Mary Adaline Perry, Howard Rosenthal, Jimmy Yager, John Wills. Honorable mention: Ferne Brinkley and Dorothy Thomp- kins. Mrs. Ed Morton, S1, died at her home near Canton on Oct. I First home for F & M Bank. 21. " . : : The Lewis County Journal October 25, 1928 Mrs. Elizabeth Bronestine, 79, heard and answered her Saviour's summons at her home in Lewistown on Oct. 21. James T. Phillips of Ewing, veteran leader of the Missouri State Grange, was again chosen to head that organiza- tion at the meeting in Jefferson City, last week for the ensuing two years. 60 YEARS AGO The Levis County Journal October 25, 1918 The epidemic of influenza in the camps seems to be under control at least in the South. The board received word to send 36 men to Fort Worth, Tex., Monday. Our school was ordered closed since last Friday. Hazel Grove All of the schools are closed for an indefinite length of time on account of the influenza. Durham We have recently read that the 33rd Division had gone "over the top" in France and came out victorious. We have several boys in that Division: Arthur Marvin, Edgar Cram- mer, Artie Leake, Emery and Harold Ewing, who have at one time claimed Durham for their home, are members of the 33rd. A new program for public eating places effective Oct. 21. Neither bread nor sugar may be served unless the guests request it. When bread and butter is asked for it must not be put upon the table until the first course is served. This is to do away with the pre-war custom of idly consuming bread while waiting for the first course to come. If sugar is requested, not more than one teaspoonful may be served to one person. News reached this-place Thursday that two sons of the late James Lasswell, who formerly lived north of town, Present building in 1920 j The DeCoster Report... BY RICHARD DegOS00, FIRST DISTRICT REPRESENTA1NE Info on commerce The amount of general information that comes across the desk of an elected official is beyond the capacity of any one person to consume and digest. Nevertheless, in grasp- ing bits and pieces here and there and now and then one they are doing, .seldom, if ever, indicating what the actual .cost is. In a recent issue I picked up a couple of items that I feel are worth passing on. Accord- ing to "Update" 10 years ago 23 per cent of the nation's comes up with a wealth of labor force belonged to information that stimulates unions. Now 19.4 per cent are thought and broadens ones union members -- salary general understanding of what increases in the U.S. in 1978 is going on. One of the more will result in a $10 billion valuable pieces of information increase in federal income tax had died, victims of Spanish that I receive on a regular revenues. A great part of the " influenza. Both boys were basis is "CID Update". It is increase coming from the working in Quincy and when their mother received the new of their illness, one of them was moved home where he died and the other one died in a hospital. The remains of put out by the Missouri taxpayers moving into a Division of Commerce and higher rate bracket. --State Industrial Development. Like Government in Missouri is most such publications, a good increasing its spending at deal of it's contents is devoted about the same rate as the to telling you what a good job personal income in the state is YESYERYE00R'5 PIEY[IRE5 A disastrous fire destroyed a business building across from the Farmers and Merchants Bank building in 1911. The site was later purchased by the bank, and the present building constructed and occupied in 1914. Note merchandise rescued from the fire stacked in foreground. Three-story brick building, now occupied by the Eagle Care in LOrnnge, was' first home of/he Farmers amd Merchants Bank of LaGrange. This photo, taken about 1920, shows the present building, surrounded by riders on horseback. Photos were provided by LaGrange Branch of Northeast Missouri Library, from old photo album in the library's collection. rising. Nationally, however, take the time to come to states are "spending" 25 per Jefferson City and appear at a cent more than their income, hearing of our committee on Following no doubt the ex- Aministrative Rules. I feel ample of the Federal Govern- confident that his appearance ment. will help us in improving state The unreality of state lines is illuminated by an item indicating that Motorola is expanding in Jasper County (Mo.) with 250 new jobs there, 300 miles from us. This so soon after many of our people lost their jobs when Motorola moved out of Quincy. On balance this is a big gain for Missouri, but that is little consolation to those Missouri- ans in Northeast Missouri who lost their jobs as a result of the switch. We've mentioned before the amount of time that govern- meat officials and employees spend going to one another's meetings. Last week the State Mental Health Association met in St, Louis the same day that the State Mental Retar- dation Association met in Columbia. We were happy to have Chester Smith, a 1st District government. SOCIAL-------- SECURITY '* TIPS HELEN A. BEEDLEm,,m. q:My husband and I were married for only three months when he had a heart attack and died. I understand that we were not married long enough for me to receive widow's benefits. Is there any benefit I can receive on his record? A: Yes, you could possibly be eligible for the lump sum ...... death payment if you and your busband were living in . the same household at the time of his death. There is no. duration of merchant from Wyaconda, quirement for