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October 26, 1978     Press-News Journal
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of senior00citizens heard Haired Legislature" was the representative Silver Haired Jefferson City were submit- by the Five priority and includ- home patients 2. Increase on the Nursing Home 3. Certificate containment Statewide nuts- pro- Missouri Office Area Agencies 5. Increase mental health Were given by Eagleton, Joseph P. that one of a civilized degree to which esteems and its older mem- said, "We to guar- income level and income from by inflation. we have not as available indicate that 12 per cent of Americans aged 55 and over live at or below the poverty level. "Social Security benefits comprise the major source of income for most older people, but the average social secur- ity benefit is only $234 per month for a retired worker, Uearnes for and only $223 per month fox an aged widow... Social security payments are not enough to live on and even at the current level of benefits the social security system has been on shakey financial ground." Eagleton said the Congress will have to make a thorough examination of the social security system next year. "We must find a better balance between meeting the financial needs of senior citizens and relieving the tax burden on wage earners." He cited the second major responsibility facing the fed- eral government is in the field of health. "We must make sure that not only adequate health care is available to every older American, but also that this care is financed in such a manner as to require little or no out-of- pocket expense for retirees." Employment opportunities and help in financing were other responsibilities of the federal government cited by the speaker. The session ended on Tues- day, with a tea hosted by Mrs. Joseph P. Teasdale, at the Governor's Mansion. Lehr endorses auditor One of the men who helped establish the theme of profes- sionalism in the Missouri State Auditor's office has given an unqualified vote of confidence and his personal endorsement in a letter to former governor Warren E. Hearnes, who is the Demo- cratic nominee for Auditor. Merrell campaigns The former State Auditor George Lehr, now in the banking business in Kansas City, says he sees Hearnes as a man who "can step into the Auditor's office and on the first day be functional." OFFICIAL ITUTIONAL BALLOT STATE OF MISSOURI Tuesday, November 7, 1978 CONSTITUTIONAL ,6 (Submitted by the 79th G.eneral Assembly) (First Regular Session) Authorizes counties to issue utility or airport revenue bonds with voter approval; authorizes governing bodies of counties and municipalities to issue industrial development revenue bonds. , INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS favor of this proposition, place an X in the box If you are opposed to this proposition, place opposite "NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. 7 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (First Regular Session) Permits officers established by con- tract between municipalities or political subdivisions to issue revenue bonds for utility, industrial and airport purposes when authorized by voters. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS favor of this proposition, place an X in the box if you are opposed to this proposition, place opposite *'NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. 8 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (First Regular Session) Defines lottery to permit games of chance where nothing of value is ex- changed for opportunity to par- ticipate or receive prize. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOFERS favor of this proposition, place an X in the box if you are opposed to this proposition, place opposite -NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. 9 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (Second Regular Session) Authorizes earlier time for canvass of votes by board of state convassers following each general election. It is estimated that there would be no additional cost or savings to the State if the Amendment is adopted. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS favor of this proposition, place an X in the'box If you are opposed to this proposition, place opposite "NO". i J ) )as. Secretary of State of the State certify that the attached form of Ballot is in compliance with the ! Sect/on 125.050, Revised Statutes, , and CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. I 0 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (Second Regular Session) Voters may authorize counties to levy additional tax for road and bridge purposes, and the legislature !=--1 YES[ ! may provide by law that taxes for road and bridge purposes shall be reduced. It is estimated that there [---I NO[__] would be no additional cost or savings to the State if this Amend- ment is adopted. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS If you are in favor of this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "YES". if you are opposed Io this proposition, place , an X in the box opposite "NO". CONSTITUTIONAL f . AMF.NDMENT NO. r... / (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (Second Regular Session) Funds from conservation com- mission's one-eighth cent sales tax shall be used for payments in lieu of taxes to local governments on com- mission lands acquired after July 1, 1977, and forest cropland, as provided by law. Payments from the Conservation Commission fund will be required, however, the dollar amount will be contingent upon the legislation enacted by the General Assembly and the amount of acreage acquired by the Commission after July 1, 1977. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS If you are in favor of this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "YES". If yol are opposed to this proposition, place an X in tide box opposite "NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. 22 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (Second Regular Session) NO V7 Authorizes general assembly to enact laws to require local govern- ments to reduce rates of levy for taxes which may be imposed. It is estimated that there would be no additional cost or savings to the State if this Amendment is adopted. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS If you are in favor of this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "*YES". If you are opposed to this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO 23 (Proposed by Initiative Petition) Provides that no person be deprived of the right to work for any employer because of membership or non- membership in any labor organization or because of payment or nonpayment of charges to any labor organization. It is estimated that there would be no additional cost or savings to the State if this Amendment is adopted. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS if yea are in favor of this proposition, place an X in the box opposite 'YES". if yon are opposed to this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "NO". Section 115.245 d the 1977 Supplement. In Testimony Where--, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Seal d my dries. Done at the City of Jefferson this 19th day of September, 1978. James C. Kirkpatrick Secretary of State Senator Norman Merrell visits with constituents in the Press-News Journal office during a campaign swing through his native Lewis County Thursday. Among those pictured are Mrs. Gene Lindsey, Carol Rich, Kathleea Wilson, Robert Cary, and, at right, Estil Fretweil, 1st Dist. representative candidate, who joined MerreH daring the day long visit of Lewis Co. communities. Form Right to Work group for union members A Kansas City electrical worker has announced the formation of a statewide organization of union workers supporting the Right To Work proposal, Amendment 23, on the November 7th ballot. Carney R. Williams, a 10 year member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, and 24 other union members from across the state became charter mem- bers of Workers For Better Unions on Monday. Williams, chairman of the committee, said the purpose of the group will be to present the positive benefits to Right To Work to the state's union members. "Many union members want to see Right To Work passed because it will increase our control over our union offici- als, especially those in Wash- ington, D.C.," Williams said. "That's why Meany, Fitzsim- mops and others are fighting it so hard." I Williams outlined two addi- tional reasons he feels Right i To Work is good for union i members. "First, in Right To Work states, good unions are stronger, they grow faster, they are more democratic, and with less corruption. Also, Right To Work is a better pocketbook deal for us. Where union workers have the in- creased leverage of optional membership, the unions are run more efficiently, meaning the workers pay less dues and assessments and take more home." Williams said the committee will focus on union members concerned with the present union leadership. "Much of Missouri's union leadership is shady to say the least. We want to identify the members who want their unions cleaned up, strengthened and preserv- ed and get those members to vote for Right To Work," he said. .Aging agency Grain in the bin funding is is not same as announced $ in pocket Governor Joseph Teasdale has announced the finding allotments for Missouri's ten area agencing on aging. Governor Teasdale said, "These funds will be used toward securing and main- taining maximum economic and personal independence and dignity for Missouri's .nior citizens." The allocations to the Area Agencies on Aging are as follows: Southeast Missouri (serving 18 counties) $865,406; Mid-East Missouri (serving 4 counties) $1,561,909; Northeast Missouri (serving 18 counties) $772,425; Northeast Missouri (serving 16 counties) $604,691; Central Missouri (serving 19 counties) $828,943; Southwest Missouri Office on Aging (serving 17 counties) $927,396; Mid-America Regional Coun- cil on Aging (serving 5 counties including Kansas City) $1,491,029; District III Area Agency on Aging (serv- ing 13 counties) $660,298; Mayor's Office for Senior Citizens (serving St. Louis) $1,627,265; and the newly designated tenth Area Agency on Aging (serving 4 counties) $350,410. The financial funding for- mula is based on the number of elderly 60 and older, the number of elderly 75 and older, the number of persons at or below poverty level and tae number of minority per- sons residing in a planning and service area. [-'I CANTON. MO. THURSDAY, OCT. 26, 1978 952 in Lewis Co. work in trucking related industry Trucking industry employ- ment and payrolls in Lewis County reached an all time high in the mid 70s, according to a new reference booklet on bus and truck industries. and maintain a portion of the 965,186 trucks registered in Missouri. State-wide, the in- dustry employs 240,000 men and women with a payroll exceeding $2.5 billion. flaying grain in the bin is not the same a having money in your pocket. Grain storage takes proper management. Storage losses can become quite significant, especially with long term storage pro- grams. Even with a govern- ment loan program, you are required to deliver top quality grain when the loan matures. Grain temperature is quite important. High temperatures increase respiration, insect activity and mold growth. At cooler temperatures you can store wetter grain without much spoilage. A large differ- ence between air temperature and stored grain temperature is not good. In the fall, you want to cool the grain to 40 degree F for best storage. It is better not to freeze the grain as it can cause condensation problems in the spring warm up. When the fan is first turned on to cool the grain you can spot potential problems by smelling the initial exhaust air. Musty or moldy odors in- dicate a problem somewhere in the bin. Grain should be checked regularly at 30 day intervals, even in winter. Check for any signs of insects or any heat build-up. The grain should generally be within 20 degree F of the average season temperature. In the spring the grain needs to be warmed up to 65 degree F. Cold grain will cause condensation on the outside layer and result in spoilage. By all means you need to keep insects out of the stored grain. Flying insects can be controlled with no-pest strips. A grain protectant can also be used on feed grains. Once insects are found in the grain, fumigation is the answer. The longer you store the grain the greater the hazard of losses will be. from $120 a year for passen- ger cars to more than $3,400 on a single truck. Trucks and buses pay $3.2 million weekly in state and federal taxes toward construction, mainten- ance and administrationof the The 14-page publication en- The booklet points out that titled, "Missouri Bus and nearly two-thirds of Missouri&,.Mism lay,,$ystem. Truck Transportation-1977 communities depend totally Fact Book", was compiled by upon trucks for surface trans- the research committee of the portation of freight. A total of Missouri Bus and Truck 1,067 populated Missouri corn- Association. Containing facts munities out of 1,731, or 61.6 about bus and truck transpor- per cent, depend upon trucks ration in all 114 counties and for the delivery of necessary in the state, the booklet is life products. designed to provide authentic On a state-wide basis, information for the use of 204,013 farm trucks transport- teachers, libraries, newspap- ed 79.7 million pounds of ers and public officials, locally grown fresh fruits and It reveals that 952 men and vegetables to 12 major mar- women were employed in kets throughout the nation. Lewis County by private and The publication reveals that for hire carriers to operate 99.9 per cent of all this produce went to market by truck. The section on taxes points OFFICIAL out that 40.4 per cent of all state and federal taxes paid 11 re itr I t J di and trucks which in combina- after me, u c a ot highways was paid by buses tion, represent only 22.6 per cent of the total vehicles November 7, 1978 registered. Taxes on motor Copies of the reference booklet are available on request to the Missouri Bus and Truck Association Office in Jefferson City. Submitting to the voters whether the Judges named below, whose terms expire December 31, 1978, shall be retained in their offices for new terms. VOTE ON EACH JUDGE. OFFICIAL BALLOT General Election SUPREME COURT JUDGES Shall Judge Albert L. Rendlen of the Supreme Court of the State of Missouri be retained in office? (Mark an X in the box you prefer) Shall Judge Robert T. Donnelly of the Supreme Court of the State of Missouri be retained in office? (Mark an X in the box you prefer) Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1978 INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS To cast a vote for trustees upon this ballot place a cross (X) mark in the square opposite the name of this cancliclate or candidates for whom you wish to vote: our vote will not be counted for any candidate unless the cross (X) is placed opposite his name. For Health Center Trustee MISSOURI COURT OF APPBALS JUDGE, ST. LOUIS DISTRICT Shall Judge James R. Reinhard of the St. Louis District Court of Appeals be retained in office? rq 77 (Mark an X in the box you prefer) State of Missouri ) Secretary of State ) ss. I, James C. Kirkpatrick, Secretary OF State of the State of Missouri, hereby certify that the attached form of Judicial Ballot is in compliance with Article V, Sac. 29-c, o the Constitution of the State of Missouri. In Testimony Wbered, I have hereunto net my hand and affixed the Seal of my office. Done in the City of Jeffemon this 19th day of September, 1978. James C. Kirklmtrick, Secretary ef State (Vote for two) [ TERRY FRETwELL j- HELEN M. TURN1ER State of Missouri ) County of Lewis ) ss. I, Linton Jenkins, County Clerk of the County Court within and for the County OF Lewis do hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true and correct copy of the Health Center Trustee Ballot to be voted upon Novemher 7, 1978. In Testimony Whereof I hereunto set my hand and affix the seal c said County Court. Done in Monticello, Mimmuri, this 19th day  September, t97e. IJnton Jenkim, County Clerk of senior00citizens heard Haired Legislature" was the representative Silver Haired Jefferson City were submit- by the Five priority and includ- home patients 2. Increase on the Nursing Home 3. Certificate containment Statewide nuts- pro- Missouri Office Area Agencies 5. Increase mental health Were given by Eagleton, Joseph P. that one of a civilized degree to which esteems and its older mem- said, "We to guar- income level and income from by inflation. we have not as available indicate that 12 per cent of Americans aged 55 and over live at or below the poverty level. "Social Security benefits comprise the major source of income for most older people, but the average social secur- ity benefit is only $234 per month for a retired worker, Uearnes for and only $223 per month fox an aged widow... Social security payments are not enough to live on and even at the current level of benefits the social security system has been on shakey financial ground." Eagleton said the Congress will have to make a thorough examination of the social security system next year. "We must find a better balance between meeting the financial needs of senior citizens and relieving the tax burden on wage earners." He cited the second major responsibility facing the fed- eral government is in the field of health. "We must make sure that not only adequate health care is available to every older American, but also that this care is financed in such a manner as to require little or no out-of- pocket expense for retirees." Employment opportunities and help in financing were other responsibilities of the federal government cited by the speaker. The session ended on Tues- day, with a tea hosted by Mrs. Joseph P. Teasdale, at the Governor's Mansion. Lehr endorses auditor One of the men who helped establish the theme of profes- sionalism in the Missouri State Auditor's office has given an unqualified vote of confidence and his personal endorsement in a letter to former governor Warren E. Hearnes, who is the Demo- cratic nominee for Auditor. Merrell campaigns The former State Auditor George Lehr, now in the banking business in Kansas City, says he sees Hearnes as a man who "can step into the Auditor's office and on the first day be functional." OFFICIAL ITUTIONAL BALLOT STATE OF MISSOURI Tuesday, November 7, 1978 CONSTITUTIONAL ,6 (Submitted by the 79th G.eneral Assembly) (First Regular Session) Authorizes counties to issue utility or airport revenue bonds with voter approval; authorizes governing bodies of counties and municipalities to issue industrial development revenue bonds. , INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS favor of this proposition, place an X in the box If you are opposed to this proposition, place opposite "NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. 7 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (First Regular Session) Permits officers established by con- tract between municipalities or political subdivisions to issue revenue bonds for utility, industrial and airport purposes when authorized by voters. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS favor of this proposition, place an X in the box if you are opposed to this proposition, place opposite *'NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. 8 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (First Regular Session) Defines lottery to permit games of chance where nothing of value is ex- changed for opportunity to par- ticipate or receive prize. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOFERS favor of this proposition, place an X in the box if you are opposed to this proposition, place opposite -NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. 9 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (Second Regular Session) Authorizes earlier time for canvass of votes by board of state convassers following each general election. It is estimated that there would be no additional cost or savings to the State if the Amendment is adopted. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS favor of this proposition, place an X in the'box If you are opposed to this proposition, place opposite "NO". i J ) )as. Secretary of State of the State certify that the attached form of Ballot is in compliance with the ! Sect/on 125.050, Revised Statutes, , and CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. I 0 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (Second Regular Session) Voters may authorize counties to levy additional tax for road and bridge purposes, and the legislature !=--1 YES[ ! may provide by law that taxes for road and bridge purposes shall be reduced. It is estimated that there [---I NO[__] would be no additional cost or savings to the State if this Amend- ment is adopted. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS If you are in favor of this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "YES". if you are opposed Io this proposition, place , an X in the box opposite "NO". CONSTITUTIONAL f . AMF.NDMENT NO. r... / (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (Second Regular Session) Funds from conservation com- mission's one-eighth cent sales tax shall be used for payments in lieu of taxes to local governments on com- mission lands acquired after July 1, 1977, and forest cropland, as provided by law. Payments from the Conservation Commission fund will be required, however, the dollar amount will be contingent upon the legislation enacted by the General Assembly and the amount of acreage acquired by the Commission after July 1, 1977. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS If you are in favor of this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "YES". If yol are opposed to this proposition, place an X in tide box opposite "NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO. 22 (Submitted by the 79th General Assembly) (Second Regular Session) NO V7 Authorizes general assembly to enact laws to require local govern- ments to reduce rates of levy for taxes which may be imposed. It is estimated that there would be no additional cost or savings to the State if this Amendment is adopted. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS If you are in favor of this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "*YES". If you are opposed to this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "NO". CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT NO 23 (Proposed by Initiative Petition) Provides that no person be deprived of the right to work for any employer because of membership or non- membership in any labor organization or because of payment or nonpayment of charges to any labor organization. It is estimated that there would be no additional cost or savings to the State if this Amendment is adopted. INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS if yea are in favor of this proposition, place an X in the box opposite 'YES". if yon are opposed to this proposition, place an X in the box opposite "NO". Section 115.245 d the 1977 Supplement. In Testimony Where--, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Seal d my dries. Done at the City of Jefferson this 19th day of September, 1978. James C. Kirkpatrick Secretary of State Senator Norman Merrell visits with constituents in the Press-News Journal office during a campaign swing through his native Lewis County Thursday. Among those pictured are Mrs. Gene Lindsey, Carol Rich, Kathleea Wilson, Robert Cary, and, at right, Estil Fretweil, 1st Dist. representative candidate, who joined MerreH daring the day long visit of Lewis Co. communities. Form Right to Work group for union members A Kansas City electrical worker has announced the formation of a statewide organization of union workers supporting the Right To Work proposal, Amendment 23, on the November 7th ballot. Carney R. Williams, a 10 year member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, and 24 other union members from across the state became charter mem- bers of Workers For Better Unions on Monday. Williams, chairman of the committee, said the purpose of the group will be to present the positive benefits to Right To Work to the state's union members. "Many union members want to see Right To Work passed because it will increase our control over our union offici- als, especially those in Wash- ington, D.C.," Williams said. "That's why Meany, Fitzsim- mops and others are fighting it so hard." I Williams outlined two addi- tional reasons he feels Right i To Work is good for union i members. "First, in Right To Work states, good unions are stronger, they grow faster, they are more democratic, and with less corruption. Also, Right To Work is a better pocketbook deal for us. Where union workers have the in- creased leverage of optional membership, the unions are run more efficiently, meaning the workers pay less dues and assessments and take more home." Williams said the committee will focus on union members concerned with the present union leadership. "Much of Missouri's union leadership is shady to say the least. We want to identify the members who want their unions cleaned up, strengthened and preserv- ed and get those members to vote for Right To Work," he said. .Aging agency Grain in the bin funding is is not same as announced $ in pocket Governor Joseph Teasdale has announced the finding allotments for Missouri's ten area agencing on aging. Governor Teasdale said, "These funds will be used toward securing and main- taining maximum economic and personal independence and dignity for Missouri's .nior citizens." The allocations to the Area Agencies on Aging are as follows: Southeast Missouri (serving 18 counties) $865,406; Mid-East Missouri (serving 4 counties) $1,561,909; Northeast Missouri (serving 18 counties) $772,425; Northeast Missouri (serving 16 counties) $604,691; Central Missouri (serving 19 counties) $828,943; Southwest Missouri Office on Aging (serving 17 counties) $927,396; Mid-America Regional Coun- cil on Aging (serving 5 counties including Kansas City) $1,491,029; District III Area Agency on Aging (serv- ing 13 counties) $660,298; Mayor's Office for Senior Citizens (serving St. Louis) $1,627,265; and the newly designated tenth Area Agency on Aging (serving 4 counties) $350,410. The financial funding for- mula is based on the number of elderly 60 and older, the number of elderly 75 and older, the number of persons at or below poverty level and tae number of minority per- sons residing in a planning and service area. [-'I CANTON. MO. THURSDAY, OCT. 26, 1978 952 in Lewis Co. work in trucking related industry Trucking industry employ- ment and payrolls in Lewis County reached an all time high in the mid 70s, according to a new reference booklet on bus and truck industries. and maintain a portion of the 965,186 trucks registered in Missouri. State-wide, the in- dustry employs 240,000 men and women with a payroll exceeding $2.5 billion. flaying grain in the bin is not the same a having money in your pocket. Grain storage takes proper management. Storage losses can become quite significant, especially with long term storage pro- grams. Even with a govern- ment loan program, you are required to deliver top quality grain when the loan matures. Grain temperature is quite important. High temperatures increase respiration, insect activity and mold growth. At cooler temperatures you can store wetter grain without much spoilage. A large differ- ence between air temperature and stored grain temperature is not good. In the fall, you want to cool the grain to 40 degree F for best storage. It is better not to freeze the grain as it can cause condensation problems in the spring warm up. When the fan is first turned on to cool the grain you can spot potential problems by smelling the initial exhaust air. Musty or moldy odors in- dicate a problem somewhere in the bin. Grain should be checked regularly at 30 day intervals, even in winter. Check for any signs of insects or any heat build-up. The grain should generally be within 20 degree F of the average season temperature. In the spring the grain needs to be warmed up to 65 degree F. Cold grain will cause condensation on the outside layer and result in spoilage. By all means you need to keep insects out of the stored grain. Flying insects can be controlled with no-pest strips. A grain protectant can also be used on feed grains. Once insects are found in the grain, fumigation is the answer. The longer you store the grain the greater the hazard of losses will be. from $120 a year for passen- ger cars to more than $3,400 on a single truck. Trucks and buses pay $3.2 million weekly in state and federal taxes toward construction, mainten- ance and administrationof the The 14-page publication en- The booklet points out that titled, "Missouri Bus and nearly two-thirds of Missouri&,.Mism lay,,$ystem. Truck Transportation-1977 communities depend totally Fact Book", was compiled by upon trucks for surface trans- the research committee of the portation of freight. A total of Missouri Bus and Truck 1,067 populated Missouri corn- Association. Containing facts munities out of 1,731, or 61.6 about bus and truck transpor- per cent, depend upon trucks ration in all 114 counties and for the delivery of necessary in the state, the booklet is life products. designed to provide authentic On a state-wide basis, information for the use of 204,013 farm trucks transport- teachers, libraries, newspap- ed 79.7 million pounds of ers and public officials, locally grown fresh fruits and It reveals that 952 men and vegetables to 12 major mar- women were employed in kets throughout the nation. Lewis County by private and The publication reveals that for hire carriers to operate 99.9 per cent of all this produce went to market by truck. The section on taxes points OFFICIAL out that 40.4 per cent of all state and federal taxes paid 11 re itr I t J di and trucks which in combina- after me, u c a ot highways was paid by buses tion, represent only 22.6 per cent of the total vehicles November 7, 1978 registered. Taxes on motor Copies of the reference booklet are available on request to the Missouri Bus and Truck Association Office in Jefferson City. Submitting to the voters whether the Judges named below, whose terms expire December 31, 1978, shall be retained in their offices for new terms. VOTE ON EACH JUDGE. OFFICIAL BALLOT General Election SUPREME COURT JUDGES Shall Judge Albert L. Rendlen of the Supreme Court of the State of Missouri be retained in office? (Mark an X in the box you prefer) Shall Judge Robert T. Donnelly of the Supreme Court of the State of Missouri be retained in office? (Mark an X in the box you prefer) Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1978 INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS To cast a vote for trustees upon this ballot place a cross (X) mark in the square opposite the name of this cancliclate or candidates for whom you wish to vote: our vote will not be counted for any candidate unless the cross (X) is placed opposite his name. For Health Center Trustee MISSOURI COURT OF APPBALS JUDGE, ST. LOUIS DISTRICT Shall Judge James R. Reinhard of the St. Louis District Court of Appeals be retained in office? rq 77 (Mark an X in the box you prefer) State of Missouri ) Secretary of State ) ss. I, James C. Kirkpatrick, Secretary OF State of the State of Missouri, hereby certify that the attached form of Judicial Ballot is in compliance with Article V, Sac. 29-c, o the Constitution of the State of Missouri. In Testimony Wbered, I have hereunto net my hand and affixed the Seal of my office. Done in the City of Jeffemon this 19th day of September, 1978. James C. Kirklmtrick, Secretary ef State (Vote for two) [ TERRY FRETwELL j- HELEN M. TURN1ER State of Missouri ) County of Lewis ) ss. I, Linton Jenkins, County Clerk of the County Court within and for the County OF Lewis do hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a true and correct copy of the Health Center Trustee Ballot to be voted upon Novemher 7, 1978. In Testimony Whereof I hereunto set my hand and affix the seal c said County Court. Done in Monticello, Mimmuri, this 19th day  September, t97e. IJnton Jenkim, County Clerk