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October 31, 1985     Press-News Journal
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N IOR SCEI004 E Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, October 31, 1985, Page 5a CO. Ho!00idoaYo?!f S aow to be at new location Health Council gets grants NO y u " g gn Centers, In-Home Services in Le 'is, country fried pork steak, creamed for Rural Health project will sponsor the 3rd annual Holiday Clark, Knox and Scotland counties, gravy, mashed potatoes, spiced apple- to be celebrated in Kitty Wagner, 2nd; 6th ; Beatrice Viola Spurgeon, 11; 12th; Gertrude Bo- and Mamie Davis, 27th. and Ruth Rauter on the piano for sing-a-long Band on Monday. The I so nice that the following to take a drive around at the autumn colors houses that are being Constantz, Frances Louise Lind, Edna Mc- Davis, Nettle Mae Durward Speer, Mable Nellie Dye. Some of the to drive by their and neighborhoods. the Canton Baptist sing-a-long and inspira- Ifternoon Penny Bash, Marion Goehl, Leora Becker, Elsie Munz- Dye, Durward Spear and were invited to Rest Home to visit with new. Rite Windoffer, entertained on the some residents Michels, activity direct- and donuts. Everyone and we appreciate the View for the kindness was enjoyed Wednes- ball was played in and a Bible message 11 a.m. morning activity was by Sunday School Sharpe. Resident's Cancelled because Presi- Jackson still remains a hospital. Paul Kinney and singing and inspira- birthday party was Louise Lind, Esther Leora Becker, Ethel McCormick, Milton Miller, and Pearl basbach entertained on a song-a-long. Mr. and Baxter, Mr. and Mrs. Charlene Clatt assisted cake and drink. really enjoy visits and Kim Brown daughters. staff extend their and Dick Holmes at the death of her Frederick C. Lauer DD$ Mid.America Denture Clinic for November 3 will Rev. George Braden of Methodist Church. On at 2 p.m. a new group from Quincy will Dept. y Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m. only: Nov. 5 & 12; WIC pickup, Well Baby Clinic (CHC) Planning Clinic, Nov. Clinic, Nov. 4 & 19; Clinic, Nov. 20 (a.m. Appointment Necessary: Clinics: 12, 11-11:30 at Senior Nov. IS, 11-11:30 at r; LaGrange, Nov. 20, Center; LaBelle, 1:30 at Nutrition Site; Nov. 27, 11-11:30 at -, 11:30-12 at Masonic Cancelled this holiday. Classes beginning call 314-767-5312 to closed Nov. II, 28 and Gift Show at the Lewistown Elemen- tary School Nov. 10. The doors will be open to the public at 10 am. and close at 4 p.m. Please note -- this is a change of location and will allow space for additional crafters to show and sell their wares. In addition, a turkey dinner with all the trimmings will be served in the school cafeteria starting at 11 a.m. The Lewis County Council on Aging, Inc. is a not-for-profit corporation which sponsors the nutrition service program in Lewis County Senior Elwin Walker attended a supper at the church Monday evening with Mr. Sharpe. They enjoyed the meal and the fellowship. Willa Daggs went to Margaret Holberts Tuesday to help celebrate her 85th birthday. Wednesday Betty Dance held Bible Study and everyone enjoyed the pumpkin cookies she brought. Mildred Gaus came by Wednesday and Roxie spent the afternoon with her and some other friends. and the Foster Grandparent Program. For more information concerning the Holiday Gift Show or any of these services, call the central office located at Ewing, Travelle Whitaker, coordin- ator (314-494-3339) or the nutrition center nearest you. Canton. Doris Lay, 314-288-3633; Hilltop Center, Mildred Rossiter, 314-655-4387: LaBelle, Donna Stice, 816-462-3412; Lewistown, Lucille Thom- as. 314-4-2489: Ewing, Gladys Catron, 314-494-3631; Williamstown, Mary Ed- wards. 314-853-4400. Menu for week of Nov. 4: Monday, sauce, sugar cookies Tuesday, juicyburgers, baked beans, creamed turnips, orange juice, bun, gold cake w-coconut topping. Wednesday: lasagna, buttered broc- coli, chilled plums, garlic bread, ice cream Thursday: fried chicken, parsleyed potatoes, buttered carrots, hot rolls, strawberry gelatin w-bananas. Friday: sausage gravy, corn chow- der, tomato juice, biscuits, lemon pie. Saturday: baked ham, glazed sweet potatoes, green beans, applesauce, bar cookies. STONE HAVEN NEMO AreaAgency on Aging NEWS held meeting at Shelbina Friday, little Shannon Stone, daugh- ter of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Stone came to visit. The residents enjoyed holding her and watching her cute expressions. Saturday, Charlie Ungerbalker's birthday was celebrated with birthday cake and ice cream served in his honor. Saturday afternoon Ethel Porter attended her granddaughter's wedding. Saturday evening, Robert Sykes went to a Halloween party in Durham. Ruby Long spent Sunday afternoon with her daughter Kara Linnenburger. Those attending church Sunday were Elwin Walker, Willa Daggs and Ethel Porter. LA BELLE MANOR HAPPENINGS The October days are swiftly passing with more rains than sunshine. The Manor residents have been keeping busy with some of the following activities. The Knox City Assembly of God Church held Bible study Saturday with Dorothy Edwards, Elizabeth Bradshaw, Wilda Conn and Wilda Squires singing special songs. Rev. Squires and Wanda Squires played their musical instruments. He deliver- ed the study. The Methodist-Presbyterian Church held Sunday services. Sunday after- noon Porter Shinn and friends entertained us with music. Our movie "Old Time Radio Comedians" was shown with refreshments of soda and popcorn. The Lampi Hi Rise Kitchen Band played for us Wednesday. We have several residents that enjoy dancing. They are Gladys Jones, Mac Wilson, Maggie Kimberley, Channell Townsle, Charles Asher, Virginia Mc- Bride, Chris Schlenz, Edna Marshall, Gladys Ferrell and Judy East. Refreshments of lemonade and cookies were served. Thursday morning the Head Start children entertained us with their Halloween program. Following their visit with the residents refreshments of cookies and lemonade were served. Thursday afternoon Hey. Wilbur Sharpe had Bible study with the residents. New residents that are making friends are Mary Simmons and Crystal Tuley. Gene Frame has returned to the Canton-Senior Housing and Becky Price has returned from the hospital. Next Thursday afternoon at 2 we will have our Halloween party Now is the time to plant your Hardy Mum We a large selection in bloom Wh/le they last- Sl.00 each PLANTS AGAIN. PNONIE 655,4802 IT SlVI/M:IT... GET INTO ... . .. _ Board members and area citizens met in the Father Buhman Center, Shelbina0 for the monthly board meeting of the Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging on Monday, Oct. 21. Highlights of the meeting included a presentation by Doug li of Kollar, Abernethy and Co., auditors for the NEMO AAA. Mr. Kollar presented the final results of the 1985 fiscal audit on the central office and four subcontractors. Discussion center. ed on the revenue sources of the Area Agency on Aging and its subcontract- ors. Fifty-nine percent of the funds came from federal sources, 5 percent from non-federal and public cash, 2 percent from state general revenue, and 34 percent from program income (contributions from program partici- pants). The importance of the contri- butions from program participants, whose contributions stay in their respective counties was stressed; with- out these contributions many pro- grams would have to drastically re- duce their services. Kollar summariz- ed his remarks by saying, "The Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging is providing an essential and quality service to the citizens of northeast Missouri." As a supplement to the audit, the NEMO AAA presented its first annual report to the Board of Directors, This report summarizes all the programs funded through the Area Agency on Aging in fiscal year 1985.. Additional reports were given by Gene Corbett, Nutrition Director; Mar|ha Wadlin, Executive Director; Carmaleta Williams, Pike County Coordinator; Chris Waldmier, Home- care of Mid-Missouri. Cindy O'Laugh- fin, OATS Area Director announced the appointment of Don Erter as new director for Oats, Inc. Becky Mansfield, Information-Special Pro- jects Director, presented the five priority bills chosen by the Silver Haired Legislature at its Oct. 15-17 meeting. These bills were: first) establish a presidential primary, second) increase funding levels for In-Home services, third) redefine eligibility requirements for Medicaid assistance, Fourth) create a Resident- ial Utility Consumer Advocate, and Fifth) revise Missouri's statutory lien law. Special recognition was given by Martha Wadlin, Executive Director, to two senior centers for outstanding programs during the first quarter of the new fiscal year. Diane Hendrix, director of the Monroe City Senior Center, was recognized for her efforts in increasing the participation in the nutrition program for that area. Mary Pyles, County Coordinator for Schuyler County, was recognized for implement- ing the second meal-a-day program as a regular part of her nutrition program., The next meeting of the Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging Board will be Nov. 18, 1985 in Moberly. The NEMO AAA serves the counties of Adair, Clark, Knox, Lewis, Lincoln, Macon, Marion, Monroe, Montgomery, Pike, Rails, Randolph, Schuyler, Scotland, Shelby and Warren. Danforth supports effort to protect food stamps U.S. Senator Jack banforth (R-MO) is supporting an effort t protect food stamp benefits in households that receive federal assistance with their heating bills. Danforth and seven colleagues are canvassing the Senate for votes to preserve food stamp benefit levels threatened by cuts to offset aid with home heating bills. "It would be unconscmnable to force a choice of 'heat or eat' on the poorest Americans," Danforth said. "congress established the energy assistance program in 1980 with the clear intention that energy assistance would not be counted against benefits under other federal programs. Our amend- ment to preserve food stamp benefits would reaffirm this intent. "Under the pending bills, states with the coldest winters would suffer the greatest reductions in benefits. It is not reasonable to expect states with the coldest winters to carry significant reductions in the nation's basic nutrition program-during a season when adequate nutrition is especially critical to good health." Under pending budget and farm legislation, food stamp benefits would be cut an average of $14.70 per month nationwide in households that receive aid with heating bills under the Low income Home Energy Assistance Program. An estimated 5.5 million households would lose benefits nation- wide. In Missouri, the bill opposed by Danforth would bring an average monthly cut of $16.80 in more than 88,000 households, by estimate of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The maximum reduction in benefits would be $28.80 per month. Joining Danforth in seeking support for an amendment to preserve existing benefits were Senators Tom Eagleton (D-Mo.I. Robert Stafford R-Vt.i, John Heinz R- Pa.L Alfonse D'Amato (R-N. y.;, Edward Kennedy (D-Me.), John Glenn tD-Oh) and Patrick l.,eahy ( D-Vt. ). L I IIIIIII I DON'T MISS AN ISSUE Check the date on your mailing address I IIIII I I SALE NOTICE The following items will be auctioned Nov. 6th, 1985, in a lump sum at 1:00 p.m. at the North door of the court house in Monticello, Mo. Commercial walk-in cooler w-compressor; 7 ton air conditioner w-new compressor; 75 lb. ice machine; 75,000 BTU unit heater; hood w-exhaust fan; large gas grill; 30" gas stove; kitchen deep well commercial 3 well stainless sink; 3-well stainless sink under bar; kitchen 12" adjustable shelving; antique back bar; 24 case beer cooler; 2 30-gal. water heaters; 2 gas wall furnaces; 2]' long front bar; electric 2-well deep fryer; 3 keg draft beer cooler w-compressor; double door soda cooler; gas furnace ceiling unit; small air conditioner; 12' Bar; 2-well stainless sink; small bar portable; 5-hole stainless steam table; frost free refrigerator; freezer; 8 tables; cash register, electric Oasio; 25 chairs; table model color TV, 21"; hall tree; 32 bar stools; 6 bar stools, floor mounted; 4 wall lights; 2 stage lights; 3 red upholstered booths w-tables; stainless salad bar; pots, pans, utensils, silverware, dishes, glasses and bar equipment; cleaning equipment. The Northeast Missouri Health Council recently awarded a $212,105 federal grant for the continued funding of the Rural Health Initiative project, which partially supports the KCOM Rural Health Clinics. The grant will contribute towards the total project cost of $731,048. Funding for the remainder of the project will be provided by National Medical Enterprises, which is contri-" buting $219,000, and by patient fees collected from rural clinic visits. The major emphasis of the project; according to Phi|lip E. Messner, Ed. D., RHI director, is the addition of licensed osteopathic physicians to the clinic's staff. Until last July the clinics were staffed solely by student doctors under the supervision of KCOM faculty. Physicians who are currently providing health care at the clinics are Will Chamberlain, D.O., Wyconda; Margaret Wilson, D.O., Green Castle; Wayne Hawkins, D.O., assistant medical director of the rural clinic program. Bucklin and Browning; Richard Mercer, D.O., associate professor of pediatrics, Glenwood and Downing; and Janise Denton, D.O., who is at the Brashear Clinic uder the direction of Marlene Wagner, D.O., assistant profeaor of general practice and RHI medical director. Patty John, assistant RHI project director, said the communities have been very receptive to the new physicians. She said the communities finally have a physician who they can call "their doctor." Having a full-time physician also gives continuity for the patients. "Before the changes in the RHI project," said Johns, "the clinic's staff changed every four months where as now patients e, aa visit the clinic and see an esteopathie dtor they know and who is acquainted with their medical history." The licensed physicians also provide the opportunity to track certain conditions and diseases. This prevent- ive technique of tracking allows the physician to prescribe a treatment for such conditions as smoking, alcohol- ism, nutrition and hypertension and then follow the patients progress over a certain period of time. Another change created by the RHI project is the addition of a sliding fee scale for the billing and collecting of rural clinic fees, Dr. Memmer said the fee can be seen as a mechanism that allows the clinic to reduce the cost of health care for the patients. Seeking nominations for 1986 Mother of the Year The Missouri Mothers Association of the American Mothers, Inc., an- nounces the launching of their search for the 1986 Missouri Mother of the Year. Nomination forms are now being distributed statewide to state and national women's organizations, church groups, as well as civic and ed- ucational organizations. Nomination forms are available by writing to the State Search Chairman, Mrs. Freda Powers, Blue Flat Farm, Route 1, Box 153, Windsor, Mo. 65360. Organizations throughout the state are urged to obtain a nomination form and submit their candidates. Children May not nominate their mothers. To be eligible a mother must be 45 years of age, her youngest child must be 15 by Jan. 1, 1986, she must be an active member of the church, and must be a good influence in her home, church and community. The deadline for postmarked entries (portfolios) is Jan. 11, 1986. The applicant should begin getting her portfolio together for her organization in November. The nominees are judged by a jury composed of state and community leaders, on personal characteristics, influence in the community, state and her success as mother and homemaker as evidenced in her children. Check Your Renewal Date; Don't Miss an Issuel Dentures UMm*& I,mw Dmttuma Please call for an apDointment of WRITE FOR FREE DETAILS Hayward Drive Rt. 3, box 19(3 Mr. VetnO. 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Call or writ/' hr the lull d*'l.ll on bcnctits, cost, and bCl3t'fi| reduchon,, Jltltll,ttl,.,l| and CXCtUSRH15, CALL [217} 224-1978 OR WroTE TO STEVE HOENER Agent 3036 Broadway Street Quincy, I!!. 62301 f / _ BANKERS LIFE AND CASUALTY C()MPANY (hit ago, Itlimfi b0hlO P-524 , _,,,. _ . . lit ..... N IOR SCEI004 E Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, October 31, 1985, Page 5a CO. Ho!00idoaYo?!f S aow to be at new location Health Council gets grants NO y u " g gn Centers, In-Home Services in Le 'is, country fried pork steak, creamed for Rural Health project will sponsor the 3rd annual Holiday Clark, Knox and Scotland counties, gravy, mashed potatoes, spiced apple- to be celebrated in Kitty Wagner, 2nd; 6th ; Beatrice Viola Spurgeon, 11; 12th; Gertrude Bo- and Mamie Davis, 27th. and Ruth Rauter on the piano for sing-a-long Band on Monday. The I so nice that the following to take a drive around at the autumn colors houses that are being Constantz, Frances Louise Lind, Edna Mc- Davis, Nettle Mae Durward Speer, Mable Nellie Dye. Some of the to drive by their and neighborhoods. the Canton Baptist sing-a-long and inspira- Ifternoon Penny Bash, Marion Goehl, Leora Becker, Elsie Munz- Dye, Durward Spear and were invited to Rest Home to visit with new. Rite Windoffer, entertained on the some residents Michels, activity direct- and donuts. Everyone and we appreciate the View for the kindness was enjoyed Wednes- ball was played in and a Bible message 11 a.m. morning activity was by Sunday School Sharpe. Resident's Cancelled because Presi- Jackson still remains a hospital. Paul Kinney and singing and inspira- birthday party was Louise Lind, Esther Leora Becker, Ethel McCormick, Milton Miller, and Pearl basbach entertained on a song-a-long. Mr. and Baxter, Mr. and Mrs. Charlene Clatt assisted cake and drink. really enjoy visits and Kim Brown daughters. staff extend their and Dick Holmes at the death of her Frederick C. Lauer DD$ Mid.America Denture Clinic for November 3 will Rev. George Braden of Methodist Church. On at 2 p.m. a new group from Quincy will Dept. y Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m. only: Nov. 5 & 12; WIC pickup, Well Baby Clinic (CHC) Planning Clinic, Nov. Clinic, Nov. 4 & 19; Clinic, Nov. 20 (a.m. Appointment Necessary: Clinics: 12, 11-11:30 at Senior Nov. IS, 11-11:30 at r; LaGrange, Nov. 20, Center; LaBelle, 1:30 at Nutrition Site; Nov. 27, 11-11:30 at -, 11:30-12 at Masonic Cancelled this holiday. Classes beginning call 314-767-5312 to closed Nov. II, 28 and Gift Show at the Lewistown Elemen- tary School Nov. 10. The doors will be open to the public at 10 am. and close at 4 p.m. Please note -- this is a change of location and will allow space for additional crafters to show and sell their wares. In addition, a turkey dinner with all the trimmings will be served in the school cafeteria starting at 11 a.m. The Lewis County Council on Aging, Inc. is a not-for-profit corporation which sponsors the nutrition service program in Lewis County Senior Elwin Walker attended a supper at the church Monday evening with Mr. Sharpe. They enjoyed the meal and the fellowship. Willa Daggs went to Margaret Holberts Tuesday to help celebrate her 85th birthday. Wednesday Betty Dance held Bible Study and everyone enjoyed the pumpkin cookies she brought. Mildred Gaus came by Wednesday and Roxie spent the afternoon with her and some other friends. and the Foster Grandparent Program. For more information concerning the Holiday Gift Show or any of these services, call the central office located at Ewing, Travelle Whitaker, coordin- ator (314-494-3339) or the nutrition center nearest you. Canton. Doris Lay, 314-288-3633; Hilltop Center, Mildred Rossiter, 314-655-4387: LaBelle, Donna Stice, 816-462-3412; Lewistown, Lucille Thom- as. 314-4-2489: Ewing, Gladys Catron, 314-494-3631; Williamstown, Mary Ed- wards. 314-853-4400. Menu for week of Nov. 4: Monday, sauce, sugar cookies Tuesday, juicyburgers, baked beans, creamed turnips, orange juice, bun, gold cake w-coconut topping. Wednesday: lasagna, buttered broc- coli, chilled plums, garlic bread, ice cream Thursday: fried chicken, parsleyed potatoes, buttered carrots, hot rolls, strawberry gelatin w-bananas. Friday: sausage gravy, corn chow- der, tomato juice, biscuits, lemon pie. Saturday: baked ham, glazed sweet potatoes, green beans, applesauce, bar cookies. STONE HAVEN NEMO AreaAgency on Aging NEWS held meeting at Shelbina Friday, little Shannon Stone, daugh- ter of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Stone came to visit. The residents enjoyed holding her and watching her cute expressions. Saturday, Charlie Ungerbalker's birthday was celebrated with birthday cake and ice cream served in his honor. Saturday afternoon Ethel Porter attended her granddaughter's wedding. Saturday evening, Robert Sykes went to a Halloween party in Durham. Ruby Long spent Sunday afternoon with her daughter Kara Linnenburger. Those attending church Sunday were Elwin Walker, Willa Daggs and Ethel Porter. LA BELLE MANOR HAPPENINGS The October days are swiftly passing with more rains than sunshine. The Manor residents have been keeping busy with some of the following activities. The Knox City Assembly of God Church held Bible study Saturday with Dorothy Edwards, Elizabeth Bradshaw, Wilda Conn and Wilda Squires singing special songs. Rev. Squires and Wanda Squires played their musical instruments. He deliver- ed the study. The Methodist-Presbyterian Church held Sunday services. Sunday after- noon Porter Shinn and friends entertained us with music. Our movie "Old Time Radio Comedians" was shown with refreshments of soda and popcorn. The Lampi Hi Rise Kitchen Band played for us Wednesday. We have several residents that enjoy dancing. They are Gladys Jones, Mac Wilson, Maggie Kimberley, Channell Townsle, Charles Asher, Virginia Mc- Bride, Chris Schlenz, Edna Marshall, Gladys Ferrell and Judy East. Refreshments of lemonade and cookies were served. Thursday morning the Head Start children entertained us with their Halloween program. Following their visit with the residents refreshments of cookies and lemonade were served. Thursday afternoon Hey. Wilbur Sharpe had Bible study with the residents. New residents that are making friends are Mary Simmons and Crystal Tuley. Gene Frame has returned to the Canton-Senior Housing and Becky Price has returned from the hospital. Next Thursday afternoon at 2 we will have our Halloween party Now is the time to plant your Hardy Mum We a large selection in bloom Wh/le they last- Sl.00 each PLANTS AGAIN. PNONIE 655,4802 IT SlVI/M:IT... GET INTO ... . .. _ Board members and area citizens met in the Father Buhman Center, Shelbina0 for the monthly board meeting of the Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging on Monday, Oct. 21. Highlights of the meeting included a presentation by Doug li of Kollar, Abernethy and Co., auditors for the NEMO AAA. Mr. Kollar presented the final results of the 1985 fiscal audit on the central office and four subcontractors. Discussion center. ed on the revenue sources of the Area Agency on Aging and its subcontract- ors. Fifty-nine percent of the funds came from federal sources, 5 percent from non-federal and public cash, 2 percent from state general revenue, and 34 percent from program income (contributions from program partici- pants). The importance of the contri- butions from program participants, whose contributions stay in their respective counties was stressed; with- out these contributions many pro- grams would have to drastically re- duce their services. Kollar summariz- ed his remarks by saying, "The Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging is providing an essential and quality service to the citizens of northeast Missouri." As a supplement to the audit, the NEMO AAA presented its first annual report to the Board of Directors, This report summarizes all the programs funded through the Area Agency on Aging in fiscal year 1985.. Additional reports were given by Gene Corbett, Nutrition Director; Mar|ha Wadlin, Executive Director; Carmaleta Williams, Pike County Coordinator; Chris Waldmier, Home- care of Mid-Missouri. Cindy O'Laugh- fin, OATS Area Director announced the appointment of Don Erter as new director for Oats, Inc. Becky Mansfield, Information-Special Pro- jects Director, presented the five priority bills chosen by the Silver Haired Legislature at its Oct. 15-17 meeting. These bills were: first) establish a presidential primary, second) increase funding levels for In-Home services, third) redefine eligibility requirements for Medicaid assistance, Fourth) create a Resident- ial Utility Consumer Advocate, and Fifth) revise Missouri's statutory lien law. Special recognition was given by Martha Wadlin, Executive Director, to two senior centers for outstanding programs during the first quarter of the new fiscal year. Diane Hendrix, director of the Monroe City Senior Center, was recognized for her efforts in increasing the participation in the nutrition program for that area. Mary Pyles, County Coordinator for Schuyler County, was recognized for implement- ing the second meal-a-day program as a regular part of her nutrition program., The next meeting of the Northeast Missouri Area Agency on Aging Board will be Nov. 18, 1985 in Moberly. The NEMO AAA serves the counties of Adair, Clark, Knox, Lewis, Lincoln, Macon, Marion, Monroe, Montgomery, Pike, Rails, Randolph, Schuyler, Scotland, Shelby and Warren. Danforth supports effort to protect food stamps U.S. Senator Jack banforth (R-MO) is supporting an effort t protect food stamp benefits in households that receive federal assistance with their heating bills. Danforth and seven colleagues are canvassing the Senate for votes to preserve food stamp benefit levels threatened by cuts to offset aid with home heating bills. "It would be unconscmnable to force a choice of 'heat or eat' on the poorest Americans," Danforth said. "congress established the energy assistance program in 1980 with the clear intention that energy assistance would not be counted against benefits under other federal programs. Our amend- ment to preserve food stamp benefits would reaffirm this intent. "Under the pending bills, states with the coldest winters would suffer the greatest reductions in benefits. It is not reasonable to expect states with the coldest winters to carry significant reductions in the nation's basic nutrition program-during a season when adequate nutrition is especially critical to good health." Under pending budget and farm legislation, food stamp benefits would be cut an average of $14.70 per month nationwide in households that receive aid with heating bills under the Low income Home Energy Assistance Program. An estimated 5.5 million households would lose benefits nation- wide. In Missouri, the bill opposed by Danforth would bring an average monthly cut of $16.80 in more than 88,000 households, by estimate of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The maximum reduction in benefits would be $28.80 per month. Joining Danforth in seeking support for an amendment to preserve existing benefits were Senators Tom Eagleton (D-Mo.I. Robert Stafford R-Vt.i, John Heinz R- Pa.L Alfonse D'Amato (R-N. y.;, Edward Kennedy (D-Me.), John Glenn tD-Oh) and Patrick l.,eahy ( D-Vt. ). L I IIIIIII I DON'T MISS AN ISSUE Check the date on your mailing address I IIIII I I SALE NOTICE The following items will be auctioned Nov. 6th, 1985, in a lump sum at 1:00 p.m. at the North door of the court house in Monticello, Mo. Commercial walk-in cooler w-compressor; 7 ton air conditioner w-new compressor; 75 lb. ice machine; 75,000 BTU unit heater; hood w-exhaust fan; large gas grill; 30" gas stove; kitchen deep well commercial 3 well stainless sink; 3-well stainless sink under bar; kitchen 12" adjustable shelving; antique back bar; 24 case beer cooler; 2 30-gal. water heaters; 2 gas wall furnaces; 2]' long front bar; electric 2-well deep fryer; 3 keg draft beer cooler w-compressor; double door soda cooler; gas furnace ceiling unit; small air conditioner; 12' Bar; 2-well stainless sink; small bar portable; 5-hole stainless steam table; frost free refrigerator; freezer; 8 tables; cash register, electric Oasio; 25 chairs; table model color TV, 21"; hall tree; 32 bar stools; 6 bar stools, floor mounted; 4 wall lights; 2 stage lights; 3 red upholstered booths w-tables; stainless salad bar; pots, pans, utensils, silverware, dishes, glasses and bar equipment; cleaning equipment. The Northeast Missouri Health Council recently awarded a $212,105 federal grant for the continued funding of the Rural Health Initiative project, which partially supports the KCOM Rural Health Clinics. The grant will contribute towards the total project cost of $731,048. Funding for the remainder of the project will be provided by National Medical Enterprises, which is contri-" buting $219,000, and by patient fees collected from rural clinic visits. The major emphasis of the project; according to Phi|lip E. Messner, Ed. D., RHI director, is the addition of licensed osteopathic physicians to the clinic's staff. Until last July the clinics were staffed solely by student doctors under the supervision of KCOM faculty. Physicians who are currently providing health care at the clinics are Will Chamberlain, D.O., Wyconda; Margaret Wilson, D.O., Green Castle; Wayne Hawkins, D.O., assistant medical director of the rural clinic program. Bucklin and Browning; Richard Mercer, D.O., associate professor of pediatrics, Glenwood and Downing; and Janise Denton, D.O., who is at the Brashear Clinic uder the direction of Marlene Wagner, D.O., assistant profeaor of general practice and RHI medical director. Patty John, assistant RHI project director, said the communities have been very receptive to the new physicians. She said the communities finally have a physician who they can call "their doctor." Having a full-time physician also gives continuity for the patients. "Before the changes in the RHI project," said Johns, "the clinic's staff changed every four months where as now patients e, aa visit the clinic and see an esteopathie dtor they know and who is acquainted with their medical history." The licensed physicians also provide the opportunity to track certain conditions and diseases. This prevent- ive technique of tracking allows the physician to prescribe a treatment for such conditions as smoking, alcohol- ism, nutrition and hypertension and then follow the patients progress over a certain period of time. Another change created by the RHI project is the addition of a sliding fee scale for the billing and collecting of rural clinic fees, Dr. Memmer said the fee can be seen as a mechanism that allows the clinic to reduce the cost of health care for the patients. Seeking nominations for 1986 Mother of the Year The Missouri Mothers Association of the American Mothers, Inc., an- nounces the launching of their search for the 1986 Missouri Mother of the Year. Nomination forms are now being distributed statewide to state and national women's organizations, church groups, as well as civic and ed- ucational organizations. Nomination forms are available by writing to the State Search Chairman, Mrs. Freda Powers, Blue Flat Farm, Route 1, Box 153, Windsor, Mo. 65360. Organizations throughout the state are urged to obtain a nomination form and submit their candidates. Children May not nominate their mothers. To be eligible a mother must be 45 years of age, her youngest child must be 15 by Jan. 1, 1986, she must be an active member of the church, and must be a good influence in her home, church and community. The deadline for postmarked entries (portfolios) is Jan. 11, 1986. The applicant should begin getting her portfolio together for her organization in November. The nominees are judged by a jury composed of state and community leaders, on personal characteristics, influence in the community, state and her success as mother and homemaker as evidenced in her children. Check Your Renewal Date; Don't Miss an Issuel Dentures UMm*& I,mw Dmttuma Please call for an apDointment of WRITE FOR FREE DETAILS Hayward Drive Rt. 3, box 19(3 Mr. VetnO. 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