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October 31, 1985     Press-News Journal
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ITORIAL & OPINI,.ON Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, October 31, 1985, Page lb get more aggravating with age... ........ peuris of wisdom are g"third-hand," but are lih to Justify reprinting. t retired George lllginin Tech, who adds up ,..Lj professor, ,dd. ]t things that get on his ____..mr t5 years of American life. litigated first in Beefweek tqlF, and was reprinted in a aIt. of Farmer's Digest, and b 1 t is entitled "Things That =.Me." We think at least " ims listed aggravate all t.rdless of age. Here is = Mit: " have begun to things . s ilte as age creeps up. Since 'll101der Americans Month ,l it might be useful to i, C4 S few. those word means, very t to make mine stand up so ldeal with the truth and with Use it ii'-'eats not lived up to by ts, lawyers and others. ! ad a few minutes either ,-kalf a day -.is ridiculous. .. heat that if they tried. I behind me who toot their "".fic lights and stop signs. :"' f ta a hurry, I know, but 'ement --considering my fl'Mall that much of a hold up. J.ers who get crossw,ys of i. " ultg spaces in a crowded L ..,.  Ii n to get my goat. se.smml _ that ring twice and hang ol o%" pick it up. They've never vJt '_ and stiff knees and sit in # chairs that are hard to Up and Down the Countryside David Steinbeck Sl II start from. Get billed again for one I've already paid. Escaping those computer billings is too much for a slowed-down old codger. Letters too long. If it won't fit on one page its due to be shortened and make more sense. The letter will be improved. Too many door to door drives like Easter Seals, March of Dimes, Cancer Crusade, Girl and Boy Scouts, Lung Assn., and then a lot of them give you a second jab by mall. They should join a community fund. A notice saying I'm already a winner of a Million Dollar Sweepstakes. How gullible do they think I am? I wrote Reader's Digest and told them if I ever got another one of those dumb things, I'd cancel my subscription. Magazines that won't correct the address when you move. And there's plenty of others that won't, i have three or four organizations that still use my old address after two years begging them to change. New shirts with twice too many pins, and suits with all the tags plus pockets sewed shut. Maybe it's just the cheap ones like I use. Electronic religion, thinking up new ways of taking in another million. There's little regard for the true basis of religion in my judgement. Telephone answering machines make me doubt that they are really too busy to answer the phone .just too lazy, I figure. Not enough space in a form to answer the question. I'm already shook up with having to fill in a questionnaire, then not having enough space to answer a question makes me think that they didn't want to know anyway. They just threw it in to fill up space. Hot air instead of paper towels to dry hands and face in rest rooms. I'll admit the paper towels get stowed away in bad places and stop up commodes and the rest, but who can dry their face in a hot air deal? Two different types of screw heads encountered in putting together a child's toy. You gotts have regular and philllips, and most of the time I can't even find one kind. let alone both. And even so the slots are not cut deep enough and the driver shears off the top and fixes it so it can't be turned. Standing in line. No matter where I get in line, at the bank. ost office. liquor store, grocery, or what not I always think I'm taking the shortest one. But it always ends up moving slowest. There are undoubtedly many you could add to Litton's list. It seems ag- gravation has become a way of living. No wonder there are too few smiling faces these days. :': Sil H i d gi 1 ti ver a re Le s a on ter legislative session. Their number one The Silver Haired Legislature has and two goals are adding Missouri to been an effective voice for Missourians t,l/ . . @n(Xtor the list of states holding presidential both young and old - for many f# ['['lefrj j primaries and providing more state legislative approval - the legalization s'.  ''''" funds for in-home health services. ,t IIIII Although the Legislature increased the of "living wills", a $I million increase in state funding for in-home health " ?s hoard thId savin2 appropriation for m-home care last care and the creation of a special session, the program stm ran short of co00cil to provide improved transport- o--- ,. ,.m uu cto .yuu .., f i v%i';oihy money before the end o the f seal ation services for the elderly and a Ip,t t iV'dn'";l year. . . . handicapped. -- -Sv: ........ The group also will urge mwnmaxers As state legislators, we recognize the t." ..... 7" ....... to support measures that would invaluable contributions of senior ]re .... 'vehUreer in much the same exempt Soctal Security benefits from citizens in making our state a strong legislators, some 200 state income tax, require motorists in and productive one. We will continue in the state Missouri to carry liability insurance on t6 appreciate and support their efforts week to develop the their automobiles and require that in helping to create new and better for the 1986 legal contracts be written in simple or laws for all Missourians. "plain language". A page from a 1930s diary iLu pl. at 5:30. Ruth fixed  breakfast. While I she fixed my lunch. I |bye and went out the I1l, I walked the five we worked nine That was the best since I have been here. were hack to six and !Cold winds of December valley of the Cedar its way through the was n@ar zero. wind along Linden felt like ice. new Philco radio we bavison's was spilling news of what was London. King Edward to renounce the throne of Great Britain to marry a twice-divorced woman from Balti- more, Md. There was mixed reaction from the guys at the plant. A few "didn't care anything about it," or so they said. But to most folks it was a dramatic moment in history. Dec. 11 - I worked only six hours today, so got home early. Ruth had gone to get her hair fixed and I listened.qo the world-shaking events coming to us from across the Atlantic. Edward VIII stepped to the micro- phone and spoke in serious, measured tones. He said he was renouncing the crown, the throne and all royalty to "marry the woman I love." This brought his brother to the throne as King George VI. The radio common- tutor said that "George did not want to be king. "He was appalled," the commentator said. "He wept and sobbed on the shoulder of his mother, Queen Mary." Dec. 12 - Still cold. Only 12 above. Today I worked six hours, the last hour a! a half we just fooled around. Reports coming hack to our depart- ment from the front office are that business is very slow. Dec. 19 - Another short day at the plant. For the week I had a total of 34sz hours, so my check should be $17.25. Things look bad. To ease our minds we went to a church cantata. It was entitled, "When The Star Shone." Christmas will soon be here. We gave Kathleen Engleman 25 Cents to stay with John. Jan. 10 - The expected happened today. I was laid off. Jan. 12 - Ruth's brother came with the stock truck we sent for to move us back home. Being out of work around home was one thing; 200 miles away, with no money, among strangers, was something else. The move back home cost $25. We had been in Waterloo, Iowa, for three months. What had looked like a career at Path Packing Company didn't work out. These entries are from a daily diary I kept during the l50's. This venture was just one of several that failed to materialize during those bleak Depres. sion years. Living with hard times had become a way of life. in Danforth lOs cede is voluminous -- far beyond the single person to of its provisions that the tax cede and fairer. But Congress would draw reforms. for improve- code is pushing the reform bill. It is and Means Commit- toward action. torm could prompt this year, if the originates tax lroduces its version Some say that public interest in tax reform is slipping. New stories report a lack of clamor for a bill and a rise of opposition to particular changes in the code. Instead of an outcry for tax reform, we are told, the public is interested in other issues. Let us-suppose that public issues can be related in importance on a SCale of zero to tO  with zero indicating an issue that virtually no one cares about and with I0 indicating a matter of the most pressing importance. What we are seeing is the case of tax reform, it seems to me, is the difference between a 5 and a 10. I believe that the American people assign a I0 to the job of reducing the federal doficit. I would assign a 7 or an 8 to reforming our international trade policies. I would give a 5 to reforming the tax code. The question is not whether tax reform is important. It is clearly an important issue; one that deserves serious attention by Congress. The question is where tax reform should stand on our list of priorities. When we are running a $200 billion deficit in the federal budget, there can be one, and only one, issue that rates a 10 -- getting the deficit down. I believe the sense that tax reform is running out of steam reflects the public's sense of priorities. There is a need to simplify the cede and make it fairer, even if good and effective provisions of the code might be limited or even abolished in the process. But if you rate public issues on a scale of zero to 10, there is only one 10, and it isn't tax reform. It is continued work by Congress to reduce the very large deficit in the budget. I II lllm t I Mailbox Letters From Our Readers u, ,,, , _ ,,,m ,, Dear Friends, Please renew my subscription to the Press-News Journal, with the $12 check enclmed. I like the current format - the different features are easier to locate. I would miss the paper tremeadotmly if I did not receive it. It helps me to be somewhat aware of what's happening at home. I sometimes read things that my local family miss. Thanks. Caroline S. Beo, Detroit IIII I I I I II I I HALLOWEEN'S MAGIC HERITAGE Ask the neighborhood kids what Halloween means, and they'll tell you "trick or treat." "costumes" and :'parties." Not too many will know that Hal- loween is. literally, the evening be- fore All Hallows. other'ise known as All Saints" Day, and like many Christian observances, has its roots in pagan festivals. The Druids in ancient Britain. Ireland and France lit bonfires on the eve of their three-day November festival to drive away the spirits of the dead. And the Romans celebrated Pomona. a harwest celebration, at the same time of year Today's costumed ghosts, gob- lins. black cats and witches recall the Druids' exorcism of evil spirits. and our Halloween traditions of bobbing for apples and trick-or- treat ing for edible goodies pay hom- age to the harvest festival theme You can capture Halloween magic fhr kids of al] ages with this very special cookie treat: Great Pumpkin Cookies 2 cups flour 1 cup quick or old fashioned oats, uncooked 1 teaspoon baking soda I teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup butter or margarine, softened 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar 1 cup granulated sugar 1 egg, slightly beaten 1 teaspoon vanilla extract I can {16 ozJ LIBBY'S Solid Pack Pumpkin ! cup semi-sweet real I I o Halloween magic turns pumpkin into big party-size treats. chocolate morsels Assorted icing or peanut butter Assorted candies, raisins or nuts Preheat oven to 350F. Com. bane flour, oats, baking soda, cinnamon and salt; set aside. Cream butter; gradually add sugars, beating until light and fluffy. Add egg and vanilla; mix well Alternate additions of dry ingredients and pumpkin, mix- ing well after each addition. Stir in morsels. For each cookie, drop 1/4 cup dough onto lightly greased cookie sheet; spread into pumpkin shape using a thin metal spatula. Add a bit more dough to form stem. Bake 20-25 minutes, until cookies are firm and lightly browned. Re. move from cookie sheets; cool on racks. Decorate, using icing or peanut butter to affix as- sorted candies, raisins or nuts. Yields 19 to 20 cookies. V_ari_aAip: Substitute 1 cup raisins for morsels. Giant pumpkin cookies are so de- licious you'll probably get requests for repeats. .so bake them ahead for after school snacks or as treats in lunchboxes to put some Halloween fun into ordinary days. Great Pumpkin Cookies is one of the more than 140 favorite recipes found in Libby's "The Great Pumpkin Cookbook." Information for ordering the cookbook is on the LIBBY'S Pumpkin label. Illlll I I I I I I I I II II IIII III ..... Backward Glances Pearl Plank I II IIIIIII 20 YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News November 4, 1965 Advance registration for Parents Day at Culver-Stockton College on Nov. t3 includes a new record in attendance for this annual event on the Canton campus. Sam Staples, 94, died in Blessing Hospital Oct, 29. He lived in the Bunker Hill area for 20 years where he was engaged in farming. In 1916 he moved to Canton where he engaged in the hardware business until 1943 when he retired. J. A. Minerly, 87, died Oct. 29 in Levering Hospital, Hannibal. A retired farmer, he had lived in Canton the past year. Lesli Jo, 2, daughter of Airman and Mrs. Robert Clark, died Oct. 31 at Travis Air Base Hospital, California. William Mussotter, son of Mrs. Clara O'Neal of Canton, has enlmted in the U.S. Army. Blessing Hospital School of Nursing announced that Miss Mary Brown has been chosen to attend the Student Nurse's Association Convention in Chicago. Miss Brown is an active junior student at the SChool. The Lewis County Journal November 4, IM$ The Lewis County Hmtorical Society met for the regular quarterly meeting in LaGrange Oct. 14. Officers were re-elected as follows: president, Rus- sell Burk, Canton; 1st vice president, Mrs. Ruth Leach, Maywood; 2nd vice president, Paul Sellers, Lewistown; secretary, Mrs. Thelma Brinldey, LaGrange; treasurer, Miss Elizabeth Pollock, LaGrange. The landowners in the Buck and Doe Run Watershed, north of Canton, voted in favor of a watershed project last week. Of the total number of voters in the area, over 80 percent showed up at the polls. This "heavy vote" resulted in 105 voting yes and lg no. Elected as trustees of this watershed were Paul Carskndon, Fred Schlotter and Joe McCullough, all of Canto. Everette B. Hayden, 67, patmnd away Oct. 25 in Blessing Hospital, Quincy. He was a prominent farmer of the LaBelle community. Henry H. Brightwell, , died Friday in Blessing Hospital, Quincy. He was a retired carpenter, Clyde H. Holbert, 61, passed away at his home in Petaluma, Calif., OCt. 18. 50 YEARS AGO The Canton Record November 6, t935 Mary Josephine Buzard, 56, departed this life at the home of her daughter, Angola Mac Taylor, in Canton Nov. . Rev. V. T. Wood and son, Clark, motored here Monday from Warrens* burg. They returned home Monday afternoon accompanied by Mrs. Mar- ion Clark, who will spend the winter with them. William Pilcher has bought the OK Barbershop which has been conducted by "Kid" Smith for a number of years on Clark Street. Mr. Smith has always had a good business and new proprietor has been in business for many years. He has been located in the old Opera House building for some time. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam J. Galbraith on Clark Street was turned into a miniature hospital for seyeral days last week. Sam was confined to his home on account of a very had case of indigestion and James (Tince) Cain fell a few days ago and "harked" his shin with a result that infection set in and he had to remain home and in bed. Mr. and Mrs. E. N. Hayden and son, Ralph, were called to Plymouth, Ill., last week by the death of Mrs. Hayden's father, Robert Hedgcock, 79, a lifelong resident of the Plymouth vicinity, who passed away OCt. 29 in the home of his son-in-law and daughter, Dr. and Mrs. Rossiter of Ft. Wayne, Ind. They returned home Saturday accompanied by her mother, Mrs. Hedgcock, who will spend the winter with them. Miss Clara Million was born in December, 1859, and died Oct. 29, 1935. She was a daughter of J. D, and Emily Staples Million, who were pioneer settlers from Virginia. They were noted for their hospitality and especially ministers and bishops always found a warm welcome in their home. Mrs. Louise Meierant, 76, an active member of St. James Lutheran Church, died in her home here Saturday. She was horn in LaGrange 1859 and lived in LaGrange and Canton before eoml to Quincy years ago. Quincy aerald-Wht00 Miss Lucy Brown, St, was found dead in her home Oct. e. Durham Mrs. John OkJy, 64, parted away Nov. I at St. Mary Hospital in Quincy. Funeral servleea were conducted by Dr. David H. Shields from the home of her ran, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Coekmy, Nov. . 6O YEARS AGO The  Cmmty Jem*Ml Novemher 6, lgS About 0 members of the Poultry Association met at the home of Mrs. Fred Schlum on Tumday. By a unanimous vote, Mrs. Ethel Shackle- ford was elected president and the other efficers are as follows: vice president, Mrs. John Wallace; tary, Mrs. & W. Killebre; treamm, Mrs. Floyd Tucker; junior club leader, Mrs. Yates Lillerd. On Saturday contracts were let by the state highway department for 18 foot gravel road from Wayland to the Clark-Lewi County line on Route 9, also for six bridges on this project" Thaddetts Clark was born Dee. I0, 1944, and passed away from this life Oct. 30, 1925. He attended college at Leavenworth, Kan., also the State Normal at Kirksville where he qualified himself for teaching which he followed for 22 consecutive years. John D. Orange, 52, of LaGrange died in the Canton hospital yesterday. Mr. Orange spent his entire life in LaGrange with the exception of five years when he and his family want to Fresno, Calif., where his wife died. Mr. Orange and his only child, Harry, , to L,aGrange this fail. The board of education at llannibal has ordered that pasaages from the Bible are to be read in all public schools of that city. These passages, selected by persons d the various SChools, are to be read at assembly meetings each week. Miss Pauline Gorrell, freshman, and Miss Kathryn Tretter, senior, of. Canton High School, have the honor of making the highest grade in their rooms and were royally entertained by the Kiwanis Club last week. Miea Gorrell and Jessie Travis were the only ones to be placed on the honor roll in their room. We are very proud of our Melrose girls and holm they keep up the good work. Melrme 70 YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal November 5, lOIS, Since our State Department has set standard and made it Possible for the rural schools to get a certifieat of approval, seven one-room schools Imv = been put on the approved list in Lew County: Liberty, Hugh Becket, teseb, er; Derrahs, T. W. Kerfont; Iflghlend, Willis Bauerrichter; Johnsc J. B. McReynolds; Providence, J. T. Lem- mon; Williamstown" Rouse W. Andes. son; and Piano, Mrs. Pierce Wagner. At the meeting of the stockholders of the Lewis County Fair Asseciation held at the court house Saturday it was voted to continue the fair at its premt location and the following were elected: W. D. Barr, J. A. WeSt, J. T. Leslie, P. N. Day, N. P. Keator, J. D. Johnson, W. B. MeRoberts, R. O. Smith, Tom MeKone, George Matt. hews, J B. Porter, E. C. Glavea and James Spurgeon. At the monthly meeting of the Lmvts Coun|y Medical Association held in Monticello Wednesday Dr. George P. Knight was elected president. following MD's were in attendance: Canton, Crank, Mercer, Dunlop, Nichols; Williamstown, Jonn, Ford; Lewistown, McGlauon, Brown, Schofield; Ewing, Cole; LuGrange, Hamlin, Owens, Ellery; MonUcllo, Knight; LaBelie, Wilson. Miss Stella John B. McPike and died Oct. 24, aged 18. Dr. W. C. O'Neel, for the past 16 years a medical practitioner, will locate here for his Frofeasion. Dr. O'Neal has been located in LaGrnge for several years, and the past year had retired from active pmcti, hut has again taken up his work, Wing .We haw a new mmhant in tmv Mr. Rowsec of Steifenvil has traded for the Crocker Imtlding and intends to put in a stock of'goods at once. ITORIAL & OPINI,.ON Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, October 31, 1985, Page lb get more aggravating with age... ........ peuris of wisdom are g"third-hand," but are lih to Justify reprinting. t retired George lllginin Tech, who adds up ,..Lj professor, ,dd. ]t things that get on his ____..mr t5 years of American life. litigated first in Beefweek tqlF, and was reprinted in a aIt. of Farmer's Digest, and b 1 t is entitled "Things That =.Me." We think at least " ims listed aggravate all t.rdless of age. Here is = Mit: " have begun to things . s ilte as age creeps up. Since 'll101der Americans Month ,l it might be useful to i, C4 S few. those word means, very t to make mine stand up so ldeal with the truth and with Use it ii'-'eats not lived up to by ts, lawyers and others. ! ad a few minutes either ,-kalf a day -.is ridiculous. .. heat that if they tried. I behind me who toot their "".fic lights and stop signs. :"' f ta a hurry, I know, but 'ement --considering my fl'Mall that much of a hold up. J.ers who get crossw,ys of i. " ultg spaces in a crowded L ..,.  Ii n to get my goat. se.smml _ that ring twice and hang ol o%" pick it up. They've never vJt '_ and stiff knees and sit in # chairs that are hard to Up and Down the Countryside David Steinbeck Sl II start from. Get billed again for one I've already paid. Escaping those computer billings is too much for a slowed-down old codger. Letters too long. If it won't fit on one page its due to be shortened and make more sense. The letter will be improved. Too many door to door drives like Easter Seals, March of Dimes, Cancer Crusade, Girl and Boy Scouts, Lung Assn., and then a lot of them give you a second jab by mall. They should join a community fund. A notice saying I'm already a winner of a Million Dollar Sweepstakes. How gullible do they think I am? I wrote Reader's Digest and told them if I ever got another one of those dumb things, I'd cancel my subscription. Magazines that won't correct the address when you move. And there's plenty of others that won't, i have three or four organizations that still use my old address after two years begging them to change. New shirts with twice too many pins, and suits with all the tags plus pockets sewed shut. Maybe it's just the cheap ones like I use. Electronic religion, thinking up new ways of taking in another million. There's little regard for the true basis of religion in my judgement. Telephone answering machines make me doubt that they are really too busy to answer the phone .just too lazy, I figure. Not enough space in a form to answer the question. I'm already shook up with having to fill in a questionnaire, then not having enough space to answer a question makes me think that they didn't want to know anyway. They just threw it in to fill up space. Hot air instead of paper towels to dry hands and face in rest rooms. I'll admit the paper towels get stowed away in bad places and stop up commodes and the rest, but who can dry their face in a hot air deal? Two different types of screw heads encountered in putting together a child's toy. You gotts have regular and philllips, and most of the time I can't even find one kind. let alone both. And even so the slots are not cut deep enough and the driver shears off the top and fixes it so it can't be turned. Standing in line. No matter where I get in line, at the bank. ost office. liquor store, grocery, or what not I always think I'm taking the shortest one. But it always ends up moving slowest. There are undoubtedly many you could add to Litton's list. It seems ag- gravation has become a way of living. No wonder there are too few smiling faces these days. :': Sil H i d gi 1 ti ver a re Le s a on ter legislative session. Their number one The Silver Haired Legislature has and two goals are adding Missouri to been an effective voice for Missourians t,l/ . . @n(Xtor the list of states holding presidential both young and old - for many f# ['['lefrj j primaries and providing more state legislative approval - the legalization s'.  ''''" funds for in-home health services. ,t IIIII Although the Legislature increased the of "living wills", a $I million increase in state funding for in-home health " ?s hoard thId savin2 appropriation for m-home care last care and the creation of a special session, the program stm ran short of co00cil to provide improved transport- o--- ,. ,.m uu cto .yuu .., f i v%i';oihy money before the end o the f seal ation services for the elderly and a Ip,t t iV'dn'";l year. . . . handicapped. -- -Sv: ........ The group also will urge mwnmaxers As state legislators, we recognize the t." ..... 7" ....... to support measures that would invaluable contributions of senior ]re .... 'vehUreer in much the same exempt Soctal Security benefits from citizens in making our state a strong legislators, some 200 state income tax, require motorists in and productive one. We will continue in the state Missouri to carry liability insurance on t6 appreciate and support their efforts week to develop the their automobiles and require that in helping to create new and better for the 1986 legal contracts be written in simple or laws for all Missourians. "plain language". A page from a 1930s diary iLu pl. at 5:30. Ruth fixed  breakfast. While I she fixed my lunch. I |bye and went out the I1l, I walked the five we worked nine That was the best since I have been here. were hack to six and !Cold winds of December valley of the Cedar its way through the was n@ar zero. wind along Linden felt like ice. new Philco radio we bavison's was spilling news of what was London. King Edward to renounce the throne of Great Britain to marry a twice-divorced woman from Balti- more, Md. There was mixed reaction from the guys at the plant. A few "didn't care anything about it," or so they said. But to most folks it was a dramatic moment in history. Dec. 11 - I worked only six hours today, so got home early. Ruth had gone to get her hair fixed and I listened.qo the world-shaking events coming to us from across the Atlantic. Edward VIII stepped to the micro- phone and spoke in serious, measured tones. He said he was renouncing the crown, the throne and all royalty to "marry the woman I love." This brought his brother to the throne as King George VI. The radio common- tutor said that "George did not want to be king. "He was appalled," the commentator said. "He wept and sobbed on the shoulder of his mother, Queen Mary." Dec. 12 - Still cold. Only 12 above. Today I worked six hours, the last hour a! a half we just fooled around. Reports coming hack to our depart- ment from the front office are that business is very slow. Dec. 19 - Another short day at the plant. For the week I had a total of 34sz hours, so my check should be $17.25. Things look bad. To ease our minds we went to a church cantata. It was entitled, "When The Star Shone." Christmas will soon be here. We gave Kathleen Engleman 25 Cents to stay with John. Jan. 10 - The expected happened today. I was laid off. Jan. 12 - Ruth's brother came with the stock truck we sent for to move us back home. Being out of work around home was one thing; 200 miles away, with no money, among strangers, was something else. The move back home cost $25. We had been in Waterloo, Iowa, for three months. What had looked like a career at Path Packing Company didn't work out. These entries are from a daily diary I kept during the l50's. This venture was just one of several that failed to materialize during those bleak Depres. sion years. Living with hard times had become a way of life. in Danforth lOs cede is voluminous -- far beyond the single person to of its provisions that the tax cede and fairer. But Congress would draw reforms. for improve- code is pushing the reform bill. It is and Means Commit- toward action. torm could prompt this year, if the originates tax lroduces its version Some say that public interest in tax reform is slipping. New stories report a lack of clamor for a bill and a rise of opposition to particular changes in the code. Instead of an outcry for tax reform, we are told, the public is interested in other issues. Let us-suppose that public issues can be related in importance on a SCale of zero to tO  with zero indicating an issue that virtually no one cares about and with I0 indicating a matter of the most pressing importance. What we are seeing is the case of tax reform, it seems to me, is the difference between a 5 and a 10. I believe that the American people assign a I0 to the job of reducing the federal doficit. I would assign a 7 or an 8 to reforming our international trade policies. I would give a 5 to reforming the tax code. The question is not whether tax reform is important. It is clearly an important issue; one that deserves serious attention by Congress. The question is where tax reform should stand on our list of priorities. When we are running a $200 billion deficit in the federal budget, there can be one, and only one, issue that rates a 10 -- getting the deficit down. I believe the sense that tax reform is running out of steam reflects the public's sense of priorities. There is a need to simplify the cede and make it fairer, even if good and effective provisions of the code might be limited or even abolished in the process. But if you rate public issues on a scale of zero to 10, there is only one 10, and it isn't tax reform. It is continued work by Congress to reduce the very large deficit in the budget. I II lllm t I Mailbox Letters From Our Readers u, ,,, , _ ,,,m ,, Dear Friends, Please renew my subscription to the Press-News Journal, with the $12 check enclmed. I like the current format - the different features are easier to locate. I would miss the paper tremeadotmly if I did not receive it. It helps me to be somewhat aware of what's happening at home. I sometimes read things that my local family miss. Thanks. Caroline S. Beo, Detroit IIII I I I I II I I HALLOWEEN'S MAGIC HERITAGE Ask the neighborhood kids what Halloween means, and they'll tell you "trick or treat." "costumes" and :'parties." Not too many will know that Hal- loween is. literally, the evening be- fore All Hallows. other'ise known as All Saints" Day, and like many Christian observances, has its roots in pagan festivals. The Druids in ancient Britain. Ireland and France lit bonfires on the eve of their three-day November festival to drive away the spirits of the dead. And the Romans celebrated Pomona. a harwest celebration, at the same time of year Today's costumed ghosts, gob- lins. black cats and witches recall the Druids' exorcism of evil spirits. and our Halloween traditions of bobbing for apples and trick-or- treat ing for edible goodies pay hom- age to the harvest festival theme You can capture Halloween magic fhr kids of al] ages with this very special cookie treat: Great Pumpkin Cookies 2 cups flour 1 cup quick or old fashioned oats, uncooked 1 teaspoon baking soda I teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup butter or margarine, softened 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar 1 cup granulated sugar 1 egg, slightly beaten 1 teaspoon vanilla extract I can {16 ozJ LIBBY'S Solid Pack Pumpkin ! cup semi-sweet real I I o Halloween magic turns pumpkin into big party-size treats. chocolate morsels Assorted icing or peanut butter Assorted candies, raisins or nuts Preheat oven to 350F. Com. bane flour, oats, baking soda, cinnamon and salt; set aside. Cream butter; gradually add sugars, beating until light and fluffy. Add egg and vanilla; mix well Alternate additions of dry ingredients and pumpkin, mix- ing well after each addition. Stir in morsels. For each cookie, drop 1/4 cup dough onto lightly greased cookie sheet; spread into pumpkin shape using a thin metal spatula. Add a bit more dough to form stem. Bake 20-25 minutes, until cookies are firm and lightly browned. Re. move from cookie sheets; cool on racks. Decorate, using icing or peanut butter to affix as- sorted candies, raisins or nuts. Yields 19 to 20 cookies. V_ari_aAip: Substitute 1 cup raisins for morsels. Giant pumpkin cookies are so de- licious you'll probably get requests for repeats. .so bake them ahead for after school snacks or as treats in lunchboxes to put some Halloween fun into ordinary days. Great Pumpkin Cookies is one of the more than 140 favorite recipes found in Libby's "The Great Pumpkin Cookbook." Information for ordering the cookbook is on the LIBBY'S Pumpkin label. Illlll I I I I I I I I II II IIII III ..... Backward Glances Pearl Plank I II IIIIIII 20 YEARS AGO The Canton Press-News November 4, 1965 Advance registration for Parents Day at Culver-Stockton College on Nov. t3 includes a new record in attendance for this annual event on the Canton campus. Sam Staples, 94, died in Blessing Hospital Oct, 29. He lived in the Bunker Hill area for 20 years where he was engaged in farming. In 1916 he moved to Canton where he engaged in the hardware business until 1943 when he retired. J. A. Minerly, 87, died Oct. 29 in Levering Hospital, Hannibal. A retired farmer, he had lived in Canton the past year. Lesli Jo, 2, daughter of Airman and Mrs. Robert Clark, died Oct. 31 at Travis Air Base Hospital, California. William Mussotter, son of Mrs. Clara O'Neal of Canton, has enlmted in the U.S. Army. Blessing Hospital School of Nursing announced that Miss Mary Brown has been chosen to attend the Student Nurse's Association Convention in Chicago. Miss Brown is an active junior student at the SChool. The Lewis County Journal November 4, IM$ The Lewis County Hmtorical Society met for the regular quarterly meeting in LaGrange Oct. 14. Officers were re-elected as follows: president, Rus- sell Burk, Canton; 1st vice president, Mrs. Ruth Leach, Maywood; 2nd vice president, Paul Sellers, Lewistown; secretary, Mrs. Thelma Brinldey, LaGrange; treasurer, Miss Elizabeth Pollock, LaGrange. The landowners in the Buck and Doe Run Watershed, north of Canton, voted in favor of a watershed project last week. Of the total number of voters in the area, over 80 percent showed up at the polls. This "heavy vote" resulted in 105 voting yes and lg no. Elected as trustees of this watershed were Paul Carskndon, Fred Schlotter and Joe McCullough, all of Canto. Everette B. Hayden, 67, patmnd away Oct. 25 in Blessing Hospital, Quincy. He was a prominent farmer of the LaBelle community. Henry H. Brightwell, , died Friday in Blessing Hospital, Quincy. He was a retired carpenter, Clyde H. Holbert, 61, passed away at his home in Petaluma, Calif., OCt. 18. 50 YEARS AGO The Canton Record November 6, t935 Mary Josephine Buzard, 56, departed this life at the home of her daughter, Angola Mac Taylor, in Canton Nov. . Rev. V. T. Wood and son, Clark, motored here Monday from Warrens* burg. They returned home Monday afternoon accompanied by Mrs. Mar- ion Clark, who will spend the winter with them. William Pilcher has bought the OK Barbershop which has been conducted by "Kid" Smith for a number of years on Clark Street. Mr. Smith has always had a good business and new proprietor has been in business for many years. He has been located in the old Opera House building for some time. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam J. Galbraith on Clark Street was turned into a miniature hospital for seyeral days last week. Sam was confined to his home on account of a very had case of indigestion and James (Tince) Cain fell a few days ago and "harked" his shin with a result that infection set in and he had to remain home and in bed. Mr. and Mrs. E. N. Hayden and son, Ralph, were called to Plymouth, Ill., last week by the death of Mrs. Hayden's father, Robert Hedgcock, 79, a lifelong resident of the Plymouth vicinity, who passed away OCt. 29 in the home of his son-in-law and daughter, Dr. and Mrs. Rossiter of Ft. Wayne, Ind. They returned home Saturday accompanied by her mother, Mrs. Hedgcock, who will spend the winter with them. Miss Clara Million was born in December, 1859, and died Oct. 29, 1935. She was a daughter of J. D, and Emily Staples Million, who were pioneer settlers from Virginia. They were noted for their hospitality and especially ministers and bishops always found a warm welcome in their home. Mrs. Louise Meierant, 76, an active member of St. James Lutheran Church, died in her home here Saturday. She was horn in LaGrange 1859 and lived in LaGrange and Canton before eoml to Quincy years ago. Quincy aerald-Wht00 Miss Lucy Brown, St, was found dead in her home Oct. e. Durham Mrs. John OkJy, 64, parted away Nov. I at St. Mary Hospital in Quincy. Funeral servleea were conducted by Dr. David H. Shields from the home of her ran, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Coekmy, Nov. . 6O YEARS AGO The  Cmmty Jem*Ml Novemher 6, lgS About 0 members of the Poultry Association met at the home of Mrs. Fred Schlum on Tumday. By a unanimous vote, Mrs. Ethel Shackle- ford was elected president and the other efficers are as follows: vice president, Mrs. John Wallace; tary, Mrs. & W. Killebre; treamm, Mrs. Floyd Tucker; junior club leader, Mrs. Yates Lillerd. On Saturday contracts were let by the state highway department for 18 foot gravel road from Wayland to the Clark-Lewi County line on Route 9, also for six bridges on this project" Thaddetts Clark was born Dee. I0, 1944, and passed away from this life Oct. 30, 1925. He attended college at Leavenworth, Kan., also the State Normal at Kirksville where he qualified himself for teaching which he followed for 22 consecutive years. John D. Orange, 52, of LaGrange died in the Canton hospital yesterday. Mr. Orange spent his entire life in LaGrange with the exception of five years when he and his family want to Fresno, Calif., where his wife died. Mr. Orange and his only child, Harry, , to L,aGrange this fail. The board of education at llannibal has ordered that pasaages from the Bible are to be read in all public schools of that city. These passages, selected by persons d the various SChools, are to be read at assembly meetings each week. Miss Pauline Gorrell, freshman, and Miss Kathryn Tretter, senior, of. Canton High School, have the honor of making the highest grade in their rooms and were royally entertained by the Kiwanis Club last week. Miea Gorrell and Jessie Travis were the only ones to be placed on the honor roll in their room. We are very proud of our Melrose girls and holm they keep up the good work. Melrme 70 YEARS AGO The Lewis County Journal November 5, lOIS, Since our State Department has set standard and made it Possible for the rural schools to get a certifieat of approval, seven one-room schools Imv = been put on the approved list in Lew County: Liberty, Hugh Becket, teseb, er; Derrahs, T. W. Kerfont; Iflghlend, Willis Bauerrichter; Johnsc J. B. McReynolds; Providence, J. T. Lem- mon; Williamstown" Rouse W. Andes. son; and Piano, Mrs. Pierce Wagner. At the meeting of the stockholders of the Lewis County Fair Asseciation held at the court house Saturday it was voted to continue the fair at its premt location and the following were elected: W. D. Barr, J. A. WeSt, J. T. Leslie, P. N. Day, N. P. Keator, J. D. Johnson, W. B. MeRoberts, R. O. Smith, Tom MeKone, George Matt. hews, J B. Porter, E. C. Glavea and James Spurgeon. At the monthly meeting of the Lmvts Coun|y Medical Association held in Monticello Wednesday Dr. George P. Knight was elected president. following MD's were in attendance: Canton, Crank, Mercer, Dunlop, Nichols; Williamstown, Jonn, Ford; Lewistown, McGlauon, Brown, Schofield; Ewing, Cole; LuGrange, Hamlin, Owens, Ellery; MonUcllo, Knight; LaBelie, Wilson. Miss Stella John B. McPike and died Oct. 24, aged 18. Dr. W. C. O'Neel, for the past 16 years a medical practitioner, will locate here for his Frofeasion. Dr. O'Neal has been located in LaGrnge for several years, and the past year had retired from active pmcti, hut has again taken up his work, Wing .We haw a new mmhant in tmv Mr. Rowsec of Steifenvil has traded for the Crocker Imtlding and intends to put in a stock of'goods at once.