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Canton, Missouri
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October 31, 1985     Press-News Journal
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October 31, 1985
 

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N EIGH BORHOOD N EWS Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, October 31, News of Clubs &amp; Organizations Lewlstown Methodist UMW The U.M.W. of the Lewistown Methodist Church met Thursday afternoon, Oct. 3, in the church basemmt with Mrs. Carlme Brown as hostess. Mrs. Aline Williams, president, was m charge of the meeting, which opened. with a prayer by the pastor, Rev. Eloise Marx. Members answered roll call by m-raging something to be sold at the Lord's Acre Sale which will be held Oct. 19. Mrs. Brown bad the devotional. She read John 15:10-11 and an article from the Daffy Guide Post enUtled "Fruit of Spirit and Joy." Mrs. Williams read a poem entitled "How to Live on $I00 a Year" - about counting blessings and not luma'les. The program consisted of a round table discussion by all members of the problems in the world today. The Lewistown society members were invited to be the guests of the Canton U.M.W. on Oct. 3. A report was given on that meeting and members rom Lewistown attending were Mrs. Alice Marie Hinkle, Mrs. Stella Franks, Mrs. Beulah Adkins, Mrs. Gracie Putts, Mrs. Aline Williams, Mrs. Carlene Brown, Mrs. Christine Bringer, and Ray. Marx. The meeting dosed with a prayer. Refreshments were served and a social hour followed. Members present were Mrs. Alice Marie lilnkle, Mrs. Aungel Smith, Mrs. Aline Williams, Mrs. Bernita Penn, Mrs. Dorothy Richmond, Mrs. Fern James and Rev. Eloise Marx. Past Presidents d Canton BPW Club The Past Presidents of Canton BPW Club held their yearly dinner at Phan's Oriental Restaurant Wednesday night, Oct. 23 with fifteen past presidents attending. Those present were Jeanne Johilson, Jean Frye, Ruby Janney, Nellie Stone, Margaret Richards, Kathaleen Miller, Ethel Lloyd, Lorene Clark, Martha Taylor, Jessie Day, Lucille Quinn, Hazel Hnston, Lucille Gorrell, Pauline Gorrell and Phyllis Alderton. On Sunday, Oct. 27, ten members of the club enjoyed breakfast at the Coffee Shop at 8 a.m. and twelve members attended Immanuel United Methodist Church. Those attending were Betty Shuman, Phyllis Robertson, Luctlle Qulnn, Elsa Howell, Pauline Gorrell, Jessie Day, Ruth Engendorf, Jean Purvines, Lucllle Gorrell, Phyllis Alderten, Jean Prye and Carolyn Dasbach. These activities were in observance of National Business Women's Week. H-LG College homecoming Nov. 11-16 A week of activities is planned for Hannibal-LaGrange College students and returning alumni Nov. 11-16 during homecoming festivities on the H-LG campus. Special features of this year's homecoming will be a banquet and the homecoming  coronation Pridey night, and a pep rally, an alumni basketball game, and the Trojan homecoming game on Saturday. To get in the mood fer some fun, the week will begin with dreasp days for studts. Monday will be "Hobo Day," Tuesday is "50's Day." Wednesday is "Hawal/an Tourist Day,', Thursday is "Crazy Dress Day," and Friday will be "Spirit Day." Students, alumni and other guests w/ll enjoy a concert Thursday night at 7:30 p.m. in McKenzie Auditorium, featuring the contemporary Christian music group, The Cruse. The emge will be free to students; the public may attd for $6 a ticket for adults, U for children 12 and undsr. A benfire ,aowing the coact wm be .lasored by the cheerleaders behind Crouch Hall mens durra/tory. The homecoming banquet will be held at 5:$0 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15. Guest tickets are $4 each. The banquet will be followed by the coroaat/on of the 1985-86 homecomh queen. Return- ing alumni, H-LG cheerleaders, and faculty members Don and Sharon Buffin will provide special music during the pregram. Homecoming activities will continue Saturday, Nov. 16, with an alumni basketball game at 2 p.m. in Porter Gymmudum. Trojan basketh alunmi from the past eight years will face off in a game under the leadership of Athletic Director Don Buff'mton, who has be Trojan coach since 1977. a.bury Chapel tC The women of the Asbury Chapel United Methodist Church held their first social event, a hayride, Friday evening, Oct. 25, at the farm of LeRoy and Ruth Jones near Steffenville. Those present for the hayride and wiener roast were: Keith, Doris, and Gale Bauerrichter, Marie Lange, David, Judy, Brenda and Kimberly Stambaugh, Raymond and Bessie Smmbaugh, Scott Stambangh, Peggy Brenner, Harold and Verda Wear, Martin Lurid, Eloise Marx-Temple, Roland, Pare, Amanda, and Gregory Farr, Dianna, Timmy, Melanie and Sarah Jones, and Dean, Myrna, Ryan and Teri Wear. The next regular meeting of the group will be Nov. $ at 2 p.m. at the church. NEMO Girls Town The fall meeting of NEMO Girls Town Club was held Wednesday, Oct. 23, at 12:30 p.m. at the Lewistown Christian Church. A lunch was served by the ladies of the church. There were members and one guest, Rov. Eloise Marx, present. Four new members were recognized. The business meeting was conducted by President Kathleen Jones. It was voted that each member would lay at each spring meeting which would eliminate the necessity of baying fund raising projects. The program was given by Rev. Eloise Marx, pastor of Lewis County Parish United Methodist Church. She presented a slide program of her trip to Germany in April when she visited her son, who is in the service there. Plan your tax, keep good financial records The best way for taxpayers to enstwe that they claim all the deductions, credits, and special tax benefits to whtch they are mtttled and to ave/d overpaying their taxes is to plan their tax situations throughout the year and keep good financial records. The Internal Revenue Service emphasized that taxpayers may be able to save money by considering carefully the tax implications of year end actions. Examples include the sale or purchase of securities or the scheduling of medical appointments near the end of the year. Taxpayers must have receipts and cancelled checks that document and support the deductions claimed on tax returns should the ERS examine them. These records, in addition to those which support items of incomes, should be kept at least until the period of limitations expires for the return. Usually this is 3 years from the date the return was due or fried or 2 years from the date the tax was paid, whichever is later. Some items should be kept longer. To assist the taxpayer in tax planning and record keeping, the IRS offers Publication 552, Reeordkeeping Requirements and a List of Tax Publications. This free publication can be ordered by  your local IRS office. For C-S Parents Day Junior Lee Whittaker performs ,,only Believe," a song he wrote himself, during "An Evening of Entertain- ment." s9 million loaned thru FmHA office The fiscal year which ended Sept. 30, has been an active one for the local FmHA office at Kahoka. During the year $9,493,490 was loaned through this office. This includes housing, farm real estate, operating and emergency loans. A little over $400,000 was loaned on housing with the balance going to farm loans. Close to $7,000,000 was furnished to farmers for operating expenses and $1,685,000 was furnished for the purpose of refinancing financially stressed farmers. At present, there are 630 borrowers (a total of 50 million dollars outstanding) being serviced through the Kahol office, which includes both Clark and Lewis counties. The local office is manned by two supervisors and three office clerks. This means 'tttat a siseable -mbuiat ofloan-fum have been made available to the residents of Clark and Lewis counties with little cost to the taxpayer. All loans are made as a supplement to conventional credit. The local office hopes to help as many people as possible with personnel available. Carroll L. Mc- Veigh is the County Supervisor for the Kahoka office. UE common stock earnings up Union Electric Company's common stock for the third quarter of 1965 was t.07 per share as compared with $I.02 per share a year ago, it was announced today by William E. Cornelius, President and Chief Execu- tive Officer. Total kilowatt-hour sales increased 1.3 percent over the third quarter of 19. Sales of electricity to commercial and industrial customers increased 5 percent and 4 percent respectively. However, residential sales decreased 3 percent reflecting the effect of unusually cool temperatures in August 1985, Ewing 11-4 Fire Dept. DONATIONS USED FOR EQUIPMENT COMEINANOPLAY11 S AH Wu/uw to & Dean's 00erviee & Tire 301 N.  - CANTON, MO - 288-5572 Yourself To A Safe Hal Halloween is one of the world's oldest and most popular holidays. It enables adults as well as children to engage in the fun of fantasy and make-believe. Manufacturers of Halloween prod- ucts, in cooperation with Toy Manufacturers of America, the in- dustry trade association, recently developed a Safety and Consumer Information Program The basis of the Prog'am is a Booklet from which the following safety tips are excerpted. Makeup: Use makeup containing ingredients that are labeled "Made with U.S. Approved Color Addi- tives," "Laboratory Tested," "'Meets Federal Standards for Cosmetics" or "Non-Toxic." Follow manufac- turer's instructions for application and removal. Masks: A mask should have holes large enough to allow adequate breathing and vision. Cut to adjust, if necessary. Elastic should be permanently attached to the mask, with no sharp points. Wear mask on top of the head when walking; pull it over the face upon reaching the location. Costumes: Costumes should be of flame-retardant materials and large enough so that clothing can be worn underneath, if necessary. Children should wear comfmable shoes or sneakers. Use light colors, reflective tape and/or patches on costumes and treat bags so that trick-or-treaters are visible at night. Accessories: Children should carry flashlights or light sticks, never a candle! "Knives," "'swords" and other accessories should be made from flexible materials such as cardboard. Neighborhood Safety: Go into familiar neighborhoods, stopping only at well-lit places. Draw a simple route map, make certain child and parents have a copy and designate a return time. Give children coins and tell them to call if they are going to be late. Trick-or-Treat Phone Squad: Recently, many communities have organized a contest to encourage children to return home on time. The contest is sponsored by houses of wor- ship, the PTA, clubs or the police. Children enter by submitting their / I lelcom! I Ip.mpk,N I@thl(gttl" IIgI,Y S'r,ck re. lecture F names and telephone numbers. Names are drawn and the children telephoned. Those who answer the phone at a predetermined time-- such as 8:00 PM -- win prizes for being home on time. Treats: Give children a meal or snack before they go out and em- phasize that no treats should be eaten until they get homeLabel treats that you give with your name and telephone number so that parents can identify the source of treats. Make your own labels or use readily available, inexpensive printed ad- dress labels. Discard commercially oorOduced candy if the wrapper is se or the seal has been broken. If anything is suspicious about treats, report this to the police. Consider the following inexpensive, nonedible items for treats and/or prizes: balls and jacks; bubble pipes; coloring books; comics and 1,40,4 DAD pte e', al| storybooks; mi wind-up figures; clay; puppets; yo-yos; sm animals and dolls; a fast food shop or ice cr and stickers. Remember not to small parts to three and look for age packages. This and other as unique ideas for brations, recipes, hints are in the 32, 13 Great Ways Halloween. For a co -- NO STAMPS; order payable to BOOKLET, to cover postage and handling, your complete to: HALLOWEEN BOX 746, Madison New York, NY 10159. Unemployment in Lewis County ahead of state The unemployment rate in Missouri dropped to 53 percent in September, the lowest level of the decade, according to Paula Smith, director, State Dept. of Labor and Industrial Relations. Lewis County Unemployment figures were higher than the state at 7.8 percent for September, but slightly lower than Aqst, which was 7.9 percent. Unemployment a year ago, in September, 194, was 7.4 percent. The September rate in Missouri represents a decline from the 6.3 percent rate of one month ago and the 6.1 percent of 12 months ago. "Some < the decrease is due to seasonal factors, but the drop for four-tenths of a point from one year ago represents a strengthening of the economy," Smith said. "The labor market in Missouri is definitely stronger than it was one year ago." NO Smith said in 2,365,100 people ber, up 115,600 from C To all those desiring my services for Income Tax assistance, I would you making your appointments at date possible Eleene K. Glasemek LaGrange, MO Phone: 655-4G48 If no answer, Call: 6554150 Eaeh to intmrd to "O0,O00 FDI00 flllA& 01PO41 INtlI&NC| COII'IAIION Christmas 1986 Open your Christmas Club for 1986 now and be assured t extra holiday casi when need it most. You make 49 pal/ments, we the 5Oth for oal : Christ0000'00 Ornam000000 When you Christmas Club, will receive o beautiful new antiqued gloSS ornament Freel Farmers & Merchants NGE N EIGH BORHOOD N EWS Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, October 31, News of Clubs & Organizations Lewlstown Methodist UMW The U.M.W. of the Lewistown Methodist Church met Thursday afternoon, Oct. 3, in the church basemmt with Mrs. Carlme Brown as hostess. Mrs. Aline Williams, president, was m charge of the meeting, which opened. with a prayer by the pastor, Rev. Eloise Marx. Members answered roll call by m-raging something to be sold at the Lord's Acre Sale which will be held Oct. 19. Mrs. Brown bad the devotional. She read John 15:10-11 and an article from the Daffy Guide Post enUtled "Fruit of Spirit and Joy." Mrs. Williams read a poem entitled "How to Live on $I00 a Year" - about counting blessings and not luma'les. The program consisted of a round table discussion by all members of the problems in the world today. The Lewistown society members were invited to be the guests of the Canton U.M.W. on Oct. 3. A report was given on that meeting and members rom Lewistown attending were Mrs. Alice Marie Hinkle, Mrs. Stella Franks, Mrs. Beulah Adkins, Mrs. Gracie Putts, Mrs. Aline Williams, Mrs. Carlene Brown, Mrs. Christine Bringer, and Ray. Marx. The meeting dosed with a prayer. Refreshments were served and a social hour followed. Members present were Mrs. Alice Marie lilnkle, Mrs. Aungel Smith, Mrs. Aline Williams, Mrs. Bernita Penn, Mrs. Dorothy Richmond, Mrs. Fern James and Rev. Eloise Marx. Past Presidents d Canton BPW Club The Past Presidents of Canton BPW Club held their yearly dinner at Phan's Oriental Restaurant Wednesday night, Oct. 23 with fifteen past presidents attending. Those present were Jeanne Johilson, Jean Frye, Ruby Janney, Nellie Stone, Margaret Richards, Kathaleen Miller, Ethel Lloyd, Lorene Clark, Martha Taylor, Jessie Day, Lucille Quinn, Hazel Hnston, Lucille Gorrell, Pauline Gorrell and Phyllis Alderton. On Sunday, Oct. 27, ten members of the club enjoyed breakfast at the Coffee Shop at 8 a.m. and twelve members attended Immanuel United Methodist Church. Those attending were Betty Shuman, Phyllis Robertson, Luctlle Qulnn, Elsa Howell, Pauline Gorrell, Jessie Day, Ruth Engendorf, Jean Purvines, Lucllle Gorrell, Phyllis Alderten, Jean Prye and Carolyn Dasbach. These activities were in observance of National Business Women's Week. H-LG College homecoming Nov. 11-16 A week of activities is planned for Hannibal-LaGrange College students and returning alumni Nov. 11-16 during homecoming festivities on the H-LG campus. Special features of this year's homecoming will be a banquet and the homecoming  coronation Pridey night, and a pep rally, an alumni basketball game, and the Trojan homecoming game on Saturday. To get in the mood fer some fun, the week will begin with dreasp days for studts. Monday will be "Hobo Day," Tuesday is "50's Day." Wednesday is "Hawal/an Tourist Day,', Thursday is "Crazy Dress Day," and Friday will be "Spirit Day." Students, alumni and other guests w/ll enjoy a concert Thursday night at 7:30 p.m. in McKenzie Auditorium, featuring the contemporary Christian music group, The Cruse. The emge will be free to students; the public may attd for $6 a ticket for adults, U for children 12 and undsr. A benfire ,aowing the coact wm be .lasored by the cheerleaders behind Crouch Hall mens durra/tory. The homecoming banquet will be held at 5:$0 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15. Guest tickets are $4 each. The banquet will be followed by the coroaat/on of the 1985-86 homecomh queen. Return- ing alumni, H-LG cheerleaders, and faculty members Don and Sharon Buffin will provide special music during the pregram. Homecoming activities will continue Saturday, Nov. 16, with an alumni basketball game at 2 p.m. in Porter Gymmudum. Trojan basketh alunmi from the past eight years will face off in a game under the leadership of Athletic Director Don Buff'mton, who has be Trojan coach since 1977. a.bury Chapel tC The women of the Asbury Chapel United Methodist Church held their first social event, a hayride, Friday evening, Oct. 25, at the farm of LeRoy and Ruth Jones near Steffenville. Those present for the hayride and wiener roast were: Keith, Doris, and Gale Bauerrichter, Marie Lange, David, Judy, Brenda and Kimberly Stambaugh, Raymond and Bessie Smmbaugh, Scott Stambangh, Peggy Brenner, Harold and Verda Wear, Martin Lurid, Eloise Marx-Temple, Roland, Pare, Amanda, and Gregory Farr, Dianna, Timmy, Melanie and Sarah Jones, and Dean, Myrna, Ryan and Teri Wear. The next regular meeting of the group will be Nov. $ at 2 p.m. at the church. NEMO Girls Town The fall meeting of NEMO Girls Town Club was held Wednesday, Oct. 23, at 12:30 p.m. at the Lewistown Christian Church. A lunch was served by the ladies of the church. There were members and one guest, Rov. Eloise Marx, present. Four new members were recognized. The business meeting was conducted by President Kathleen Jones. It was voted that each member would lay at each spring meeting which would eliminate the necessity of baying fund raising projects. The program was given by Rev. Eloise Marx, pastor of Lewis County Parish United Methodist Church. She presented a slide program of her trip to Germany in April when she visited her son, who is in the service there. Plan your tax, keep good financial records The best way for taxpayers to enstwe that they claim all the deductions, credits, and special tax benefits to whtch they are mtttled and to ave/d overpaying their taxes is to plan their tax situations throughout the year and keep good financial records. The Internal Revenue Service emphasized that taxpayers may be able to save money by considering carefully the tax implications of year end actions. Examples include the sale or purchase of securities or the scheduling of medical appointments near the end of the year. Taxpayers must have receipts and cancelled checks that document and support the deductions claimed on tax returns should the ERS examine them. These records, in addition to those which support items of incomes, should be kept at least until the period of limitations expires for the return. Usually this is 3 years from the date the return was due or fried or 2 years from the date the tax was paid, whichever is later. Some items should be kept longer. To assist the taxpayer in tax planning and record keeping, the IRS offers Publication 552, Reeordkeeping Requirements and a List of Tax Publications. This free publication can be ordered by  your local IRS office. For C-S Parents Day Junior Lee Whittaker performs ,,only Believe," a song he wrote himself, during "An Evening of Entertain- ment." s9 million loaned thru FmHA office The fiscal year which ended Sept. 30, has been an active one for the local FmHA office at Kahoka. During the year $9,493,490 was loaned through this office. This includes housing, farm real estate, operating and emergency loans. A little over $400,000 was loaned on housing with the balance going to farm loans. Close to $7,000,000 was furnished to farmers for operating expenses and $1,685,000 was furnished for the purpose of refinancing financially stressed farmers. At present, there are 630 borrowers (a total of 50 million dollars outstanding) being serviced through the Kahol office, which includes both Clark and Lewis counties. The local office is manned by two supervisors and three office clerks. This means 'tttat a siseable -mbuiat ofloan-fum have been made available to the residents of Clark and Lewis counties with little cost to the taxpayer. All loans are made as a supplement to conventional credit. The local office hopes to help as many people as possible with personnel available. Carroll L. Mc- Veigh is the County Supervisor for the Kahoka office. UE common stock earnings up Union Electric Company's common stock for the third quarter of 1965 was t.07 per share as compared with $I.02 per share a year ago, it was announced today by William E. Cornelius, President and Chief Execu- tive Officer. Total kilowatt-hour sales increased 1.3 percent over the third quarter of 19. Sales of electricity to commercial and industrial customers increased 5 percent and 4 percent respectively. However, residential sales decreased 3 percent reflecting the effect of unusually cool temperatures in August 1985, Ewing 11-4 Fire Dept. DONATIONS USED FOR EQUIPMENT COMEINANOPLAY11 S AH Wu/uw to & Dean's 00erviee & Tire 301 N.  - CANTON, MO - 288-5572 Yourself To A Safe Hal Halloween is one of the world's oldest and most popular holidays. It enables adults as well as children to engage in the fun of fantasy and make-believe. Manufacturers of Halloween prod- ucts, in cooperation with Toy Manufacturers of America, the in- dustry trade association, recently developed a Safety and Consumer Information Program The basis of the Prog'am is a Booklet from which the following safety tips are excerpted. Makeup: Use makeup containing ingredients that are labeled "Made with U.S. Approved Color Addi- tives," "Laboratory Tested," "'Meets Federal Standards for Cosmetics" or "Non-Toxic." Follow manufac- turer's instructions for application and removal. Masks: A mask should have holes large enough to allow adequate breathing and vision. Cut to adjust, if necessary. Elastic should be permanently attached to the mask, with no sharp points. Wear mask on top of the head when walking; pull it over the face upon reaching the location. Costumes: Costumes should be of flame-retardant materials and large enough so that clothing can be worn underneath, if necessary. Children should wear comfmable shoes or sneakers. Use light colors, reflective tape and/or patches on costumes and treat bags so that trick-or-treaters are visible at night. Accessories: Children should carry flashlights or light sticks, never a candle! "Knives," "'swords" and other accessories should be made from flexible materials such as cardboard. Neighborhood Safety: Go into familiar neighborhoods, stopping only at well-lit places. Draw a simple route map, make certain child and parents have a copy and designate a return time. Give children coins and tell them to call if they are going to be late. Trick-or-Treat Phone Squad: Recently, many communities have organized a contest to encourage children to return home on time. The contest is sponsored by houses of wor- ship, the PTA, clubs or the police. Children enter by submitting their / I lelcom! I Ip.mpk,N I@thl(gttl" IIgI,Y S'r,ck re. lecture F names and telephone numbers. Names are drawn and the children telephoned. Those who answer the phone at a predetermined time-- such as 8:00 PM -- win prizes for being home on time. Treats: Give children a meal or snack before they go out and em- phasize that no treats should be eaten until they get homeLabel treats that you give with your name and telephone number so that parents can identify the source of treats. Make your own labels or use readily available, inexpensive printed ad- dress labels. Discard commercially oorOduced candy if the wrapper is se or the seal has been broken. If anything is suspicious about treats, report this to the police. Consider the following inexpensive, nonedible items for treats and/or prizes: balls and jacks; bubble pipes; coloring books; comics and 1,40,4 DAD pte e', al| storybooks; mi wind-up figures; clay; puppets; yo-yos; sm animals and dolls; a fast food shop or ice cr and stickers. Remember not to small parts to three and look for age packages. This and other as unique ideas for brations, recipes, hints are in the 32, 13 Great Ways Halloween. For a co -- NO STAMPS; order payable to BOOKLET, to cover postage and handling, your complete to: HALLOWEEN BOX 746, Madison New York, NY 10159. Unemployment in Lewis County ahead of state The unemployment rate in Missouri dropped to 53 percent in September, the lowest level of the decade, according to Paula Smith, director, State Dept. of Labor and Industrial Relations. Lewis County Unemployment figures were higher than the state at 7.8 percent for September, but slightly lower than Aqst, which was 7.9 percent. Unemployment a year ago, in September, 194, was 7.4 percent. The September rate in Missouri represents a decline from the 6.3 percent rate of one month ago and the 6.1 percent of 12 months ago. "Some < the decrease is due to seasonal factors, but the drop for four-tenths of a point from one year ago represents a strengthening of the economy," Smith said. "The labor market in Missouri is definitely stronger than it was one year ago." NO Smith said in 2,365,100 people ber, up 115,600 from C To all those desiring my services for Income Tax assistance, I would you making your appointments at date possible Eleene K. Glasemek LaGrange, MO Phone: 655-4G48 If no answer, Call: 6554150 Eaeh to intmrd to "O0,O00 FDI00 flllA& 01PO41 INtlI&NC| COII'IAIION Christmas 1986 Open your Christmas Club for 1986 now and be assured t extra holiday casi when need it most. You make 49 pal/ments, we the 5Oth for oal : Christ0000'00 Ornam000000 When you Christmas Club, will receive o beautiful new antiqued gloSS ornament Freel Farmers & Merchants NGE