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Canton, Missouri
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October 31, 1985     Press-News Journal
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October 31, 1985
 

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ATURE PAGE Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, October 31, 1985 3c garage in tech business modifications were made to the most t  ,,.  with telephones can u'"441  .the part played by a "aing Maywood business. Companies are finding it s, IP"-'[ to-use fiber optic cable, -,S  glass cable to transmit fiber is reported .ooo4 "f.dmP lultanenus messages. '..';-mdKUlack plastic covering and ' the ground. Enter Evans ' dE.e, Maywond. "---'.im  qClal order d machine i ",-llP May was completed   by the crew at Evans  fragile fiber optic cable ..vdtal equipment. A plow for comes from a Canadian careers are International Hough L,I Evans, welds the @'ers to the front or the '-11, builds a wire mesh t"et," to protect the cable ' i4[lWith the hot exhaust pipe, o hydraulics systems, and " Plows to the tractor.  "-II! alone weighs about the corner, a :_..M, T-I 360 sturdy steel, tall, plow, and other recent machine, the machine carried an estimated weight of 53,300 pounds. "We can now prepare one in eight or nine days, and we are trimming that down all the time," Evans said. In addition to Evans at the garage are Kirk Funkenbush, and part time workers Darrell Eisenberg and Mike Creger. "We've had a bonanza of machines (at the shop) this year. We've had more iron in and out this year (than in a long time)," Evans said. He feels one of the reasons for the "bonanza" is the governmental threat to cut investment tax credits, and customers are quickly jumping on the wagon before the feared cuts. Evans and his crew have done more than just assemble various parts of the machine. "We recommended some changes to the manufacturers after talking with the engineers and talking with the company. It's been rewarding working for a small company like this because you don't have to wait two years for the changes (to he implemented)," Evans said. Among the changes suggested since that first tractor in May, have been repositioning of hydraulic hoses, moving hydraulic cylinders from the tractor tracks, and some swivel adjustments, to name a few. "The changes are new enough that there are no parts books on it yet," said Creger. Fiber optic cable machine Mike Creger and Roger Evans of Evans Garage, Maywoed, stand beside a finished product of an International-Hough.Dresser tractor designed to plow ground and lay fiber optic telephone cable. The front part is the spool holder and the cable runs over the rollers on top and on the wheel at right when the machine is being used. attachment and Mike Creger attach a hea'vy metal narrow chute to the fitted with cable laying equipmenL The fiber optic Cable : wheel, then gb the chute into the ground after coming off el the tructor and over rollers on top of the cab of the tractor. The changes were brought by the work on the first model prototype and suggestions from Evans Garage have made added safety convenience or both. One of the prides of the machines, especially the latest, is the locally designed changes in the right-handed shift box hydraulic system, which adds control to the plow movability and positioning of the front reel carrier. The system also includes tap plug& for future use, say, later conversion to a dozer tractor without a great deal of problems. The finished tractors are approxi- mately $200,000, or can be rented at about ,000 per month. *. : When completed, the f'mal  length of the tractor is 36 feet. The hydraul/cs of the machine are strong enough to lift. the 210 horse power machine off the ground, if necessary. "We coordinate some of the parts for the owners. We don't do maintenance work in the field. St. Louis (headquar- ters for Missouri-Illinois Tractor which sells the tractors) calls us if they need to know what a chute is," Evans said. "The tractor is big enough, it won't be moved unless necessary. It's easier to replace parts in the field," Evans said. "Two qualified men are supposed to be able to disassemble an engine or transmission in nine hours." Evans remembers the first machine was a "pioneer job", and recalls having to do welding for six to eight hours on a hot day and was not tested. Because of the changes made since that first machine, the crew at Evans Ganage has logged the irdormation on dimensions, hoses, and other changes. There have also been photographs taken to communicate the changes made. Evans said the biggest problem is "standardizing and simplifying hose connectors." The first cable layer, as the machine is called, worked a line from the Chicago to Alton, Ill., area. Kingdom City to Kansas City, Mo., and reportedly now enroute to work on a line from Tulsa, Okla., to Fort Worth, Tex. The other cable layers have gone to Maryland, West Palm Beach, Fla., Decatur, Ill., and the one recently finished will be bound for North Carolina to work on a line between Washington, D.C., and Jacksonville, Fla. Only the one in Decatur is not privately owned, but instead is owned by a telephone company. But for now -- at least until spring anyway -- the Maywood branch of MIT figures there will not be anymore tractors modified this year, because of the proximity of winter. "There for a while, ff we had 10 tractors, we (MIT) could have had them all rented," Evans said. Evans affiliation with a company salesman, who formerly worked in Quincy, is one of the main resm the company put a branch office in Maywood. Just how important are the ma- chines? First consider this: the fiber optic cable, which is replacing copper wire, costs $75,000410,000 a pool. Evans said some cable laying companies will put a man on the front of the tractor, one on the rod and one or more in the hack to insure proper unrolling of the cable spool Progre is measured at a re rate., of inches per hour. Apparently, the Maywood company has been doing something right with the machines to be entltd with working on all five of the machines. And users of cable optic tibet" can be grateful in part to Eval Repair Garage, Maywood. Three types of terracing can save soil. By Allen Veus, Sell Cmservatlonkt Terraces have long been a major defense against soil erosion. They help solve many erosion and water manage- ment problems on a farm, and provide the base for an effective total remurce management system. Modern terraces are easy to farm, help control runoff and do a very good job of saving soft. The main purpose of a terrace system is to reduce erosion and manage water on cropland. Terraces, by design, divide long steep hlllsid into a series of shorter slopes. Throughout most of Missouri, the terrace channel is sloped toward a grassed waterway or underground outlet, and excessive surface runoff is transported from the field to a stable outlet. There are three types of terraces used in Missouri. Each has benefits and limitations that need to be considered before deciding the best type for your particular farming operation. One type of terracing is the Broad-Bnse type. The benefits are that the entire terrace can be farmed because no land is takon out of production, less eartlffill is needed for construction when landslopes are uniform, a moldboard plow may be used to maintain the ridge height, the ridge is easier to construct because the soil is pushed down the hill, md tt is adapted to flatter huIslopes (leas than 8 percent). Some of the iimitatiom of terraces are that the final between terraces is steeper tlum the original landslepe, it ts more difficult and hazardous to farm the steeper brood bose narrow base gross bockslope landslopes, a larger field area is dtstrubed during construction, and parallel alignment may be difficult to construct and may cost more on irregular land. Another type of terrace is the Steep Backslope. Benefits are that the final lmdslope between terraces is flatter than the original landslope, the grassed hackelopu lrovide food and cover for wildlife, the terraces are easier to make parallel to each other, and the Steep Backslaps terrace is adapted to steeper landslopes (greater than $ percent.) The limitations are that the steep backsloves are seeded to grass and  Netlee law. At least 51 percent of the funds must be used to benefit low and Commmion will moderate income persons. No dis- on November 6, placement of persons will be proposed. P.m., at the Lewis For the FY.SS applications, the County II I office in  to l to apply for water plant [ II I I1 of an applica- improvements on behalf of the Lewis Fibril Year I. CounW PWSD No. 1. Proposed cost for I e T king servi I :ent Block Grant the peoject is =,4100. Citizens will eorge Shous ruc ce . The program is have the oppornRy to comment on _ leatlos submitted Ewin o. 63440 The maximum grant regarding the fuw.al year Se4 C'DBG program. District bnard members will Hauling ! Uted is 15o0,000 for be present to answer questions about Dla'je. Activities the program and the proposed Lime, Fertilizer, Rock l" funding indudo the application. For more irormation, t/rve works, radii- centact the water district office.at 494- 9-3335 after 4:30 p.m. others allowed by st Pub. Oct. 3t It during construction, final landslope between terraces is flatter than the original landslope, inlet pipes do not interfere with farming operations, vegetation on the entire ridge provide food and cover for wildlife, machinery does not operate on ef near a steep ridge, and these terraces are adapted to landslope less tlum 15 percent. Narrow Base terraces, like the others, have limitations. The entire terrace ridge is removed from crop production, the ridge ma periodic control of Wee burrowing animals, the ridges may limit access within the field, sediment removed from crop production, the backslopes may require periodic control of weeds and burrowing animals, care must be taken when operating equipment near the steep backslaps, high ridges may limit access within the field, and special care needs to be used when applying herbicides next to vegetated slopes. The third type of terraces are Narrow Base and are fairly new to area. The benefits of Narrow Base terraces are that less earthftll is needed and less field area is disturbed may need to be periodic removed from the terrace channel, and special care needs tn be used wh applying herbicide next to vegetated slopes. More information on terrs can be optained from the Soil Conservation Service office. Soil Conservation Service personnel can help plan ud design terraces as part of a complete conservation system for your farm. Cost share funds to help install terraces and other conservation practices are available through the Agricultural Stabilization and Com- vation Service and the Sotl and Water Conservation District. i!!! Shelter Mutual Insurance Com Seter Gea tnsun Con/ ira,. on'o, uo. l.ll1$1tON, MO. AT SIfEILTER, IT'S A MATTER OFPER.MqAL RPJ For your life, health, home, car, farm, business ATURE PAGE Press-News Journal, Canton, Mo., Thursday, October 31, 1985 3c garage in tech business modifications were made to the most t  ,,.  with telephones can u'"441  .the part played by a "aing Maywood business. Companies are finding it s, IP"-'[ to-use fiber optic cable, -,S  glass cable to transmit fiber is reported .ooo4 "f.dmP lultanenus messages. '..';-mdKUlack plastic covering and ' the ground. Enter Evans ' dE.e, Maywond. "---'.im  qClal order d machine i ",-llP May was completed   by the crew at Evans  fragile fiber optic cable ..vdtal equipment. A plow for comes from a Canadian careers are International Hough L,I Evans, welds the @'ers to the front or the '-11, builds a wire mesh t"et," to protect the cable ' i4[lWith the hot exhaust pipe, o hydraulics systems, and " Plows to the tractor.  "-II! alone weighs about the corner, a :_..M, T-I 360 sturdy steel, tall, plow, and other recent machine, the machine carried an estimated weight of 53,300 pounds. "We can now prepare one in eight or nine days, and we are trimming that down all the time," Evans said. In addition to Evans at the garage are Kirk Funkenbush, and part time workers Darrell Eisenberg and Mike Creger. "We've had a bonanza of machines (at the shop) this year. We've had more iron in and out this year (than in a long time)," Evans said. He feels one of the reasons for the "bonanza" is the governmental threat to cut investment tax credits, and customers are quickly jumping on the wagon before the feared cuts. Evans and his crew have done more than just assemble various parts of the machine. "We recommended some changes to the manufacturers after talking with the engineers and talking with the company. It's been rewarding working for a small company like this because you don't have to wait two years for the changes (to he implemented)," Evans said. Among the changes suggested since that first tractor in May, have been repositioning of hydraulic hoses, moving hydraulic cylinders from the tractor tracks, and some swivel adjustments, to name a few. "The changes are new enough that there are no parts books on it yet," said Creger. Fiber optic cable machine Mike Creger and Roger Evans of Evans Garage, Maywoed, stand beside a finished product of an International-Hough.Dresser tractor designed to plow ground and lay fiber optic telephone cable. The front part is the spool holder and the cable runs over the rollers on top and on the wheel at right when the machine is being used. attachment and Mike Creger attach a hea'vy metal narrow chute to the fitted with cable laying equipmenL The fiber optic Cable : wheel, then gb the chute into the ground after coming off el the tructor and over rollers on top of the cab of the tractor. The changes were brought by the work on the first model prototype and suggestions from Evans Garage have made added safety convenience or both. One of the prides of the machines, especially the latest, is the locally designed changes in the right-handed shift box hydraulic system, which adds control to the plow movability and positioning of the front reel carrier. The system also includes tap plug& for future use, say, later conversion to a dozer tractor without a great deal of problems. The finished tractors are approxi- mately $200,000, or can be rented at about ,000 per month. *. : When completed, the f'mal  length of the tractor is 36 feet. The hydraul/cs of the machine are strong enough to lift. the 210 horse power machine off the ground, if necessary. "We coordinate some of the parts for the owners. We don't do maintenance work in the field. St. Louis (headquar- ters for Missouri-Illinois Tractor which sells the tractors) calls us if they need to know what a chute is," Evans said. "The tractor is big enough, it won't be moved unless necessary. It's easier to replace parts in the field," Evans said. "Two qualified men are supposed to be able to disassemble an engine or transmission in nine hours." Evans remembers the first machine was a "pioneer job", and recalls having to do welding for six to eight hours on a hot day and was not tested. Because of the changes made since that first machine, the crew at Evans Ganage has logged the irdormation on dimensions, hoses, and other changes. There have also been photographs taken to communicate the changes made. Evans said the biggest problem is "standardizing and simplifying hose connectors." The first cable layer, as the machine is called, worked a line from the Chicago to Alton, Ill., area. Kingdom City to Kansas City, Mo., and reportedly now enroute to work on a line from Tulsa, Okla., to Fort Worth, Tex. The other cable layers have gone to Maryland, West Palm Beach, Fla., Decatur, Ill., and the one recently finished will be bound for North Carolina to work on a line between Washington, D.C., and Jacksonville, Fla. Only the one in Decatur is not privately owned, but instead is owned by a telephone company. But for now -- at least until spring anyway -- the Maywood branch of MIT figures there will not be anymore tractors modified this year, because of the proximity of winter. "There for a while, ff we had 10 tractors, we (MIT) could have had them all rented," Evans said. Evans affiliation with a company salesman, who formerly worked in Quincy, is one of the main resm the company put a branch office in Maywood. Just how important are the ma- chines? First consider this: the fiber optic cable, which is replacing copper wire, costs $75,000410,000 a pool. Evans said some cable laying companies will put a man on the front of the tractor, one on the rod and one or more in the hack to insure proper unrolling of the cable spool Progre is measured at a re rate., of inches per hour. Apparently, the Maywood company has been doing something right with the machines to be entltd with working on all five of the machines. And users of cable optic tibet" can be grateful in part to Eval Repair Garage, Maywood. Three types of terracing can save soil. By Allen Veus, Sell Cmservatlonkt Terraces have long been a major defense against soil erosion. They help solve many erosion and water manage- ment problems on a farm, and provide the base for an effective total remurce management system. Modern terraces are easy to farm, help control runoff and do a very good job of saving soft. The main purpose of a terrace system is to reduce erosion and manage water on cropland. Terraces, by design, divide long steep hlllsid into a series of shorter slopes. Throughout most of Missouri, the terrace channel is sloped toward a grassed waterway or underground outlet, and excessive surface runoff is transported from the field to a stable outlet. There are three types of terraces used in Missouri. Each has benefits and limitations that need to be considered before deciding the best type for your particular farming operation. One type of terracing is the Broad-Bnse type. The benefits are that the entire terrace can be farmed because no land is takon out of production, less eartlffill is needed for construction when landslopes are uniform, a moldboard plow may be used to maintain the ridge height, the ridge is easier to construct because the soil is pushed down the hill, md tt is adapted to flatter huIslopes (leas than 8 percent). Some of the iimitatiom of terraces are that the final between terraces is steeper tlum the original landslepe, it ts more difficult and hazardous to farm the steeper brood bose narrow base gross bockslope landslopes, a larger field area is dtstrubed during construction, and parallel alignment may be difficult to construct and may cost more on irregular land. Another type of terrace is the Steep Backslope. Benefits are that the final lmdslope between terraces is flatter than the original landslope, the grassed hackelopu lrovide food and cover for wildlife, the terraces are easier to make parallel to each other, and the Steep Backslaps terrace is adapted to steeper landslopes (greater than $ percent.) The limitations are that the steep backsloves are seeded to grass and  Netlee law. At least 51 percent of the funds must be used to benefit low and Commmion will moderate income persons. No dis- on November 6, placement of persons will be proposed. P.m., at the Lewis For the FY.SS applications, the County II I office in  to l to apply for water plant [ II I I1 of an applica- improvements on behalf of the Lewis Fibril Year I. CounW PWSD No. 1. Proposed cost for I e T king servi I :ent Block Grant the peoject is =,4100. Citizens will eorge Shous ruc ce . The program is have the oppornRy to comment on _ leatlos submitted Ewin o. 63440 The maximum grant regarding the fuw.al year Se4 C'DBG program. District bnard members will Hauling ! Uted is 15o0,000 for be present to answer questions about Dla'je. Activities the program and the proposed Lime, Fertilizer, Rock l" funding indudo the application. For more irormation, t/rve works, radii- centact the water district office.at 494- 9-3335 after 4:30 p.m. others allowed by st Pub. Oct. 3t It during construction, final landslope between terraces is flatter than the original landslope, inlet pipes do not interfere with farming operations, vegetation on the entire ridge provide food and cover for wildlife, machinery does not operate on ef near a steep ridge, and these terraces are adapted to landslope less tlum 15 percent. Narrow Base terraces, like the others, have limitations. The entire terrace ridge is removed from crop production, the ridge ma periodic control of Wee burrowing animals, the ridges may limit access within the field, sediment removed from crop production, the backslopes may require periodic control of weeds and burrowing animals, care must be taken when operating equipment near the steep backslaps, high ridges may limit access within the field, and special care needs to be used when applying herbicides next to vegetated slopes. The third type of terraces are Narrow Base and are fairly new to area. The benefits of Narrow Base terraces are that less earthftll is needed and less field area is disturbed may need to be periodic removed from the terrace channel, and special care needs tn be used wh applying herbicide next to vegetated slopes. More information on terrs can be optained from the Soil Conservation Service office. Soil Conservation Service personnel can help plan ud design terraces as part of a complete conservation system for your farm. Cost share funds to help install terraces and other conservation practices are available through the Agricultural Stabilization and Com- vation Service and the Sotl and Water Conservation District. i!!! Shelter Mutual Insurance Com Seter Gea tnsun Con/ ira,. on'o, uo. l.ll1$1tON, MO. AT SIfEILTER, IT'S A MATTER OFPER.MqAL RPJ For your life, health, home, car, farm, business